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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; SURVIVAL ; neoplasms ; PATHWAY ; RISK ; GENE ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; BREAST-CANCER ; METASTASIS ; POOR-PROGNOSIS ; HIGH-FREQUENCY ; GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ; OVARIAN ; association study ; CORRELATE ; germline variation ; PIK3CA MUTATIONS ; PTEN LOSS
    Abstract: Background:Somatic mutations in phosphoinositide-3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) are frequent in breast tumours and have been associated with oestrogen receptor (ER) expression, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 overexpression, lymph node metastasis and poor survival. The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between inherited variation in this oncogene and risk of breast cancer.Methods:A single-nucleotide polymorphism from the PIK3CA locus that was associated with breast cancer in a study of Caucasian breast cancer cases and controls from the Mayo Clinic (MCBCS) was genotyped in 5436 cases and 5280 controls from the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) study and in 30 949 cases and 29 788 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC).Results:Rs1607237 was significantly associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer in MCBCS, CGEMS and all studies of white Europeans combined (odds ratio (OR)=0.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95-0.99, P=4.6 x 10(-3)), but did not reach significance in the BCAC replication study alone (OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.96-1.01, P=0.139).Conclusion:Common germline variation in PIK3CA does not have a strong influence on the risk of breast cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22033276
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  • 2
    Keywords: ENVIRONMENT ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; ALGORITHM ; INFORMATION ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; GENE ; SAMPLE ; MARKER ; ASSOCIATION ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; statistics ; smoking ; MARKERS ; REGION ; REGIONS ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; HLA ; PREDICTORS ; LOCATION ; SINGLE ; REGRESSION ; RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS ; interaction ; analysis ; methods ; GENOTYPE ; single-nucleotide ; single-nucleotide polymorphism ; mantel statistics ; POWER ; PREDICTOR ; LINKAGE-DISEQUILIBRIUM ; SET ; ENVIRONMENTAL-FACTORS ; case control ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; comparison ; case-control ; association study ; sex ; genetic analysis
    Abstract: Accounting for interactions with environmental factors in association studies may improve the power to detect genetic effects and may help identifying important environmental effect modifiers. The power of unphased genotype-versus haplotype-based methods in regions with high linkage disequilibrium (LD), as measured by D', for analyzing gene x environment (gene x sex) interactions was compared using the Genetic Analysis Workshop 15 (GAW15) simulated data on rheumatoid arthritis with prior knowledge of the answers. Stepwise and regular conditional logistic regression (CLR) was performed using a matched case-control sample for a HLA region interacting with sex. Haplotype-based analyses were performed using a haplotype-sharing-based Mantel statistic and a test for haplotype-trait association in a general linear model framework. A step-down minP algorithm was applied to derive adjusted p-values and to allow for power comparisons. These methods were also applied to the GAW15 real data set for PTPN22.For markers in strong LD, stepwise CLR performed poorly because of the correlation/collinearity between the predictors in the model. The power was high for detecting genetic main effects using simple CLR models and haplotype-based methods and for detecting joint effects using CLR and Mantel statistics. Only the haplotype-trait association test had high power to detect the gene x sex interaction.In the PTPN22 region with markers characterized by strong LD, all methods indicated a significant genotype x sex interaction in a sample of about 1000 subjects. The previously reported R620W single-nucleotide polymorphism was identified using logistic regression, but the haplotype-based methods did not provide any precise location information.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18466575
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; POPULATION ; RISK ; SITE ; SITES ; GENE ; GENES ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; HEALTH ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; WOMEN ; REPLICATION ; glycosylation ; ONCOLOGY ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; biomarker ; CANCER-RISK ; Genetic ; single nucleotide
    Abstract: Aberrant glycosylation is a well-described hallmark of cancer. In a previous ovarian cancer case control study that examined polymorphisms in 26 glycosylation-associated genes, we found strong statistical evidence (P = 0.00017) that women who inherited two copies of a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase, GALNT1, had decreased ovarian cancer risk. The current study attempted to replicate this observation. The GALNT1 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs17647532 was genotyped in 6,965 cases and 8,377 controls from 14 studies forming the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. The fixed effects estimate per rs17647532 allele was null (odds ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-1.07). When a recessive model was fit, the results were unchanged. Test for hetero geneity of the odds ratios revealed consistency across the 14 replication sites but significant differences compared with the original study population (P = 0.03). This study underscores the need for replication of putative findings in genetic association studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(2); 600-4. (C) 2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20142253
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; SURVIVAL ; RISK ; FAMILY ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST-CANCER ; MUTATIONS ; MUTATION CARRIERS ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONSORTIUM
    Abstract: Purpose: An assay for the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs61764370, has recently been commercially marketed as a clinical test to aid ovarian cancer risk evaluation in women with family histories of the disease. rs67164370 is in a 3'-UTR miRNA binding site of the KRAS oncogene and is a candidate for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) susceptibility. However, only one published article, analyzing fewer than 1,000 subjects in total, has examined this association. Experimental Design: Risk association was evaluated in 8,669 cases of invasive EOC and 10,012 controls from 19 studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, and in 683 cases and 2,044 controls carrying BRCA1 mutations from studies in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. Prognosis association was also examined in a subset of five studies with progression-free survival (PFS) data and 18 studies with all-cause mortality data. Results: No evidence of association was observed between genotype and risk of unselected EOC (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.95-1.10), serous EOC (OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.98-1.18), familial EOC (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 0.78-1.54), or among women carrying deleterious mutations in BRCA1 (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 0.88-1.36). There was little evidence for association with survival time among unselected cases (HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 0.99-1.22), among serous cases (HR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.99-1.28), or with PFS in 540 cases treated with carboplatin and paclitaxel (HR = 1.18, 95% CI: 0.93-1.52). Conclusions: These data exclude the possibility of an association between rs61764370 and a clinically significant risk of ovarian cancer or of familial ovarian cancer. Use of this SNP for ovarian cancer clinical risk prediction, therefore, seems unwarranted.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21385923
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  • 5
    Keywords: GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; colorectal cancer ; smoking ; gene-environment interaction ; METAANALYSIS ; Menopausal hormone therapy ; glutathione S-transferase genes
    Abstract: Copy number variations (CNVs) of the glutathione-S-transferase theta-1 (GSTT1) and glutathione-S-transferase mu-1 (GSTM1) gene loci can lead to complete lack of enzyme and have been associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Since GSTs are involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics, CNVs may modify CRC risk associated with smoking exposure and menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) use. We investigated CRC risk associated with GSTT1 and GSTM1 CNVs and their interaction with smoking in 1796 cases and 1806 age-, sex- and residence-matched controls from a German population-based case-control study (DACHS). The interaction with MHT was assessed in the subset of 684 postmenopausal female cases and 681 controls. Trimodular genotypes (0/0, 1/0, 1/1) were determined with relative quantification based on multiplex real-time PCR. The associations with CRC risk as well as possible effect modifications were evaluated using conditional logistic regression analysis. CNVs of GSTT1 and GSTM1 were not significantly associated with CRC risk. Compared to the 1/1 genotype, ORs for the 0/1 genotype and the 0/0 genotype were 0.89 (95% CI: 0.77-1.04) and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.80-1.18) for GSTT1, and 0.99 (95% CI: 0.78-1.27) and 1.03 (95% CI: 0.81-1.31) for GSTM1. Compared to the non-null genotype, ORs for the null-genotype were 1.04 (95% CI: 0.87-1.23) for GSTT1 and 1.03 (95% CI: 0.91-1.18) for GSTM1. No significant interaction with smoking and MHT use was observed. The present study does not provide evidence for a strong association between CRC risk and CNVs of GSTT1 or GSTM1 or for an effect modification of smoking or MHT use. (c) 2012 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22234881
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  • 6
    Keywords: ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; VARIANTS ; IDENTIFICATION ; METAANALYSIS ; LOCUS
    Abstract: The presence of regulatory T cells (Treg) in solid tumors is known to play a role in patient survival in ovarian cancer and other malignancies. We assessed inherited genetic variations via 749 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 25 Treg-associated genes (CD28, CTLA4, FOXP3, IDO1, IL10, IL10RA, IL15, 1L17RA, IL23A, IL23R, IL2RA, IL6, IL6R, IL8, LGALS1, LGALS9, MAP3K8, STAT5A, STAT5B, TGFB1, TGFB2, TGFB3, TGFBR1, TGRBR2, and TGFBR3) in relation to ovarian cancer survival. We analyzed genotype and overall survival in 10,084 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, including 5,248 high-grade serous, 1,452 endometrioid, 795 clear cell, and 661 mucinous carcinoma cases of European descent across 28 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). The strongest associations were found for endometrioid carcinoma and IL2RA SNPs rs11256497 [HR, 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.22-1.64; P = 5.7 x 10(-6)], rs791587 (HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.17-1.57; P = 6.2 x 10(-5)), rs2476491 (HR, = 1.40; 95% CI, 1.19-1.64; P = 5.6 x 10(-5)), and rs10795763 (HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.17-1.57; P = 7.9 x 10(-5)), and for clear cell carcinoma and CTLA4 SNP rs231775 (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54-0.82; P = 9.3 x 10(-5)) after adjustment for age, study site, population stratification, stage, grade, and oral contraceptive use. The rs231775 allele associated with improved survival in our study also results in an amino acid change in CTLA4 and previously has been reported to be associated with autoimmune conditions. Thus, we found evidence that SNPs in genes related to Tregs seem to play a role in ovarian cancer survival, particularly in patients with clear cell and endometrioid epithelial ovarian cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24764580
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  • 7
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  42. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Rheumatologie (DGRh); 28. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Orthopädische Rheumatologie (DGORh); 24. wissenschaftliche Jahrestagung der Gesellschaft für Kinder- und Jugendrheumatologie (GKJR); 20140917-20140920; Düsseldorf; DOCRA.38 /20140912/
    Publication Date: 2014-09-13
    Keywords: Treatment Patterns ; Rheumatoid Arthritis ; Germany ; ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 8
    Keywords: CELL ; Germany ; MICROSCOPY ; imaging ; SAMPLES ; RESOLUTION ; MARKER ; MARKERS ; ENDOPLASMIC-RETICULUM ; methods ; STIMULATED-EMISSION ; DEPLETION ; subdiffraction ; FLUORESCENT PROTEIN
    Abstract: We report attainment of subdiffraction resolution using stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy with GFP-labeled samples. The similar to 70 nm lateral resolution attained in this study is demonstrated by imaging GFP-labeled viruses and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of a mammalian cell. Our results mark the advent of nanoscale biological microscopy with genetically encoded markers
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16896340
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  • 9
    Keywords: IN-VITRO ; carcinoma ; evaluation ; Germany ; human ; LUNG ; MODEL ; MODELS ; PERFUSION ; VITRO ; imaging ; SYSTEM ; SYSTEMS ; TOOL ; liver ; SURGERY ; NUCLEAR-MEDICINE ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; metastases ; RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION ; HUMAN LIVER ; MOTION ; TRACKING ; BODY ; ESTABLISHMENT ; DEFORMATION ; nuclear medicine ; COMPLICATIONS ; BIOPSY ; MANAGEMENT ; radiology ; BODIES ; MOVEMENT ; development ; DIAPHRAGM ; NUCLEAR ; TESTS ; USA ; TOOLS ; RESPIRATORY MOTION ; phantom ; physics ; THERMAL ABLATION ; navigation ; MEDICINE ; respiratory liver motion simulator ; abdominal procedures ; HEPATIC-TUMORS ; image-guided therapy ; liver deformation
    Abstract: Image-guided surgery and navigation have resulted from convergent developments in radiology, teletransmission, and computer science and are well-established procedures in the surgical routine in orthopedic, neurosurgery, and head-and-neck surgery. In abdominal surgery, however, these tools have gained little attraction so far. The inability to transfer the methodology from orthopedic or neurosurgery is mainly a result of intraoperative organ movement and shifting. To practice and establish navigated interventions in the liver, a custom-designed respiratory liver motion simulator was built which models the human torso and is easy to recreate. To simulate breathing motion, an explanted porcine or human liver is mounted to the diaphragm model of the simulator, and a lung ventilator causes a periodic movement of the liver along the craniocaudal axis. Additionally, the liver can be connected to a circulating pump device which simulates hepatic perfusion and provides real surgical options to establish navigated interventions and simulate management of possible complications. Respiratory motion caused by the simulator was evaluated with an optical tracking system and it was shown that in vitro movement and deformation of a liver mounted to the device are similar to the liver movements in human or porcine bodies. Based on the tests, it is concluded that the novel respiratory liver motion simulator is suitable for in vitro evaluation of navigated systems and interventional and surgical procedures. (C) 2007 American Association of Physicists in Medicine
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18196787
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  • 10
    Keywords: Germany ; ALGORITHM ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; EXPOSURE ; GENE ; GENES ; SAMPLE ; MARKER ; ASSOCIATION ; VARIANTS ; HEALTH ; genetics ; MARKERS ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; gene-environment interaction ; PREVALENCE ; heredity ; case-control study ; RE ; VARIANT ; interaction ; analysis ; POWER ; TECHNOLOGY ; USA ; VARIABLES ; genetic association ; association study ; interactions ; DETECT ; GENE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS ; indirect association ; gene-environment interaction effect
    Abstract: Association studies accounting for gene-environment interactions (G x E) may be useful for detecting genetic effects. Although current technology enables very dense marker spacing in genetic association studies, the true disease variants may not be genotyped. Thus, causal genes are searched for by indirect association using genetic markers in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the true disease variants. Sample sizes needed to detect G x E effects in indirect case-control association studies depend on the true genetic main effects, disease allele frequencies, whether marker and disease allele frequencies match, LD between loci, main effects and prevalence of environmental exposures, and the magnitude of interactions. We explored variables influencing sample sizes needed to detect G x E, compared these sample sizes with those required to detect genetic marginal effects, and provide an algorithm for power and sample size estimations. Required sample sizes may be heavily, inflated if LD between marker and disease loci decreases. More than 10,000 case-control pairs may be required to detect G x E. However, given weak true genetic main effects, moderate prevalence of environmental exposures, as well as strong interactions, G x E effects may be detected with smaller sample sizes than those needed for the detection of genetic marginal effects. Moreover, in this scenario, rare disease variants may only be detectable when G x E is included in the analyses. Thus, the analysis of G x E appears to be an attractive option for the detection of weak genetic main effects of rare variants that may not be detectable in the analysis of genetic marginal effects only
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18163529
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