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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; SURVIVAL ; RISK ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; GENOME ; METABOLISM ; COMPLEX ; prognosis ; ASSOCIATION ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; METASTASIS ; colorectal cancer ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; PROGNOSTIC MARKERS
    Abstract: Background: Currently, the TNM classification of malignant tumours based on clinicopathological staging remains the standard for colorectal cancer (CRC) prognostication. Recently, we identified the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation chain as a consistently overrepresented category in the published gene expression profiling (GEP) studies on CRC prognosis. Methods: We evaluated associations of putative regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes from the oxidative phosphorylation chain with survival and disease prognosis in 613 CRC patients from Northern Germany (PopGen cohort). Results: Two SNPs in the 3' untranslated region of UQCRB (complex III), rs7836698 and rs10504961, were associated with overall survival (HR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.32-0.85 and HR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.42-0.99, for TT carriers). These associations were restricted to the group of patients with cancer located in the colon (HR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.22-0.82 and HR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.25-0.83). Multivariate analysis indicated that both markers might act as independent prognostic markers. Additionally, the TT carriers were similar to 2 times more likely to develop tumours in the colon than in the rectum. Two SNPs in COX6B1 (complex IV) were associated with lymph node metastasis in a dominant model (rs6510502, OR = 1.75, 95% CI 1.20-2.57; rs10420252, OR = 1.68, 95% CI 1.11-2.53); rs6510502 was associated also with distant metastasis (OR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.09-2.56 in a dominant model). Conclusions: This is the first report suggesting that markers in genes from the mitochondrial oxidative chain might be prognostic factors for CRC. Additional studies replicating the presented findings are needed.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22545919
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; SURVIVAL ; MODEL ; PATHWAY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; GENOME ; prognosis ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; PROGRESSION ; colorectal cancer ; CANCER-PATIENTS ; extracellular matrix ; THICKNESS ; CD47
    Abstract: We identified recently the extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor interaction pathway as a consistently overrepresented category among gene expression profiling studies on colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis. Putative regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes from the ECM pathway were genotyped in 613 CRC patients from Northern Germany (PopGen cohort) and tested for association with disease progression and survival. The eSNP (SNP associated with expression) rs12695175 in CD47 associated with CRC specific survival (HR = 2.18, 95 % CI 1.10-4.33, CC versus AA) and with overall survival (HR = 1.99, 95 % CI 1.04-3.81, CC versus AA). This association remained significant after adjustment for age at diagnosis, tumour stage (T) and lymph node status (N). Three polymorphisms in CD47 were associated with distant metastasis in a dominant model: rs9879947 and rs3206652 in the 3'-UTR (OR = 1.64, 95 % CI 1.01-2.64 and OR = 1.88, 95 % CI 1.27-2.80, respectively) and the eSNP rs3804639 (OR = 1.73, 95 % CI 1.17-2.57). The novel associations of eSNPs in CD47 with worse survival and distant metastasis should be confirmed by additional studies, since increased expression of this gene has recently been shown to be an indicator of poor prognosis in cancer patients
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23011546
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  • 3
    Keywords: MORTALITY ; ASSOCIATION ; MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION ; SCALE ; METAANALYSIS ; RECOMMENDATIONS ; RISK-FACTOR ; HOSPITAL ANXIETY ; CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS
    Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Symptoms of depression and anxiety contribute to determining prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease. We evaluated the association of the one-year course of symptoms of anxiety and depressive symptoms with fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular disease-events during 10-year follow-up and assessed the utilization of anti-depressant and psycholeptic medication. METHODS: Prospective cohort study in coronary heart disease patients aged 30-70 years with stable coronary heart disease. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were evaluated at baseline and follow-up using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Associations with fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular disease events were determined by a Cox-proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Nine hundred and ninety-six patients were included in this study. Of the 862 patients with a normal depression symptom score at baseline 10.3% had an increased score at one-year follow-up. Of those with an elevated symptom score at baseline, 62.7% still had an elevated score after one year. During follow-up (median 8.9 years) fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular disease events were observed in 152 patients. One year course of depressive symptoms was associated with cardiovascular disease events during follow-up (p-value for trend 0.029); for example, patients with an increase of depressive symptoms had a hazard ratio of 1.93 (95% confidence interval 1.08-3.34) compared with patients with a normal score at baseline as well as at one-year follow-up. However, if physical activity was considered as a covariate, the HRs attenuated and the association was no longer statistically significant. The utilization of anti-depressant medication in the overall population was low (overall 2%). CONCLUSIONS: The study supports a role of the one year course of symptoms of depression for long-term prognosis of patients with known coronary heart disease, which might be partly mediated by lack of physical activity.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25070785
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