Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; INFECTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; INDIVIDUALS ; glutathione-S-transferase ; E6 PROTEINS ; SEROPOSITIVITY ; BASAL-CELL ; UV-INDUCED APOPTOSIS
    Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is common worldwide and, in immunodeficient populations, may contribute to the pathogenesis of keratinocyte cancers, particularly squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). However, their role in SCC in the general population is less clear. We conducted a comprehensive analysis to investigate the independent effects of seropositivity for cutaneous alpha, beta and gamma HPV types on risk of SCC, and a meta-analysis of the available literature. In a population-based case-control study from New Hampshire, USA (n = 1,408), histologically confirmed SCC cases and controls were tested for L1 antibodies to alpha, beta and gamma cutaneous HPV types 2-5, 7-10, 15, 17, 20, 23, 24, 27b, 36, 38, 48-50, 57, 65, 75-77, 88, 92, 95, 96, 101, 103 and 107 using multiplex serology. An increasing risk of SCC with number of beta HPVs to which an individual tested positive was observed even among those seronegative for gamma types (p for trend = 0.016) with an odds ratio of 1.95 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.07-3.56) for four or more beta types positive. In a meta-analysis of six case-control studies, increased SCC risks in relation to beta HPV seropositivity were found across studies (meta odds ratio = 1.45, CI = 1.27-1.66). While the prevalence of gamma HPVs assayed was somewhat higher among SCC cases than controls, the association was only weakly evident among those seronegative for beta HPVs. Overall, the association between cutaneous HPVs and skin cancers appears to be specific to SCC and to genus beta HPVs in a general US population.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23536363
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: POPULATION ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; AFFINITY ; asthma ; ATOPY ; CD14 ; INTERLEUKIN-4 RECEPTOR-ALPHA ; EPSILON-RI-BETA ; IMMUNOGLOBULIN-E
    Abstract: Elevated IgE levels in the atopic triad of asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis is a multifactorial condition whose genetic component involves interaction of several gene loci. One hundred and two matched pairs of allergic and nonallergic individuals were phenotyped for total serum IgE level using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Atopic status was defined by serum IgE concentration 〉/=100 IU mL(-1) . SNPs genotyped include the IL4 -590C〉T (rs2243250), FCER1B E237G (rs569108), CD14 -159C〉T (rs2569190), IL4RA Q551R (rs1801275) and ADRB2 R16G (rs1042713). Gene-gene interaction was analysed using multifactor-dimensionality reduction (MDR). Significant association between atopic allergy and the IL4 -590C〉T polymorphism was confirmed in three genetic models. Interaction among the 5 gene variants was validated by MDR. The five-locus model was chosen as the best to describe the interaction of the SNPs within the context of atopy. The strongest interaction was between IL4 -590C〉T and IL4RA Q551R and between FCER1B E237G and ADRB2 R16G. The IL4 variant also interacts synergistically with the FCER1B and ADRB2 coding variants. CD14 -159C〉T, in general, interacts antagonistically with the rest of the SNPs. In conclusion, a five-locus interaction exists among IL4 -590C〉T, FCER1B E237G, CD14 -159C〉T, IL4RA Q551R and ADRB2 R16G in Filipino cases of atopic allergy.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25876437
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: ASSOCIATION
    Abstract: Background: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods: Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results: The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion: There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact: Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25336561
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: GENE ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; DNA-REPAIR ; PHENOTYPE ; CONFERS SUSCEPTIBILITY ; INDEPENDENCE ; NAT2 SLOW ACETYLATION ; GSTM1 NULL ; NADH CYTOCHROME B(5)
    Abstract: Bladder cancer is a complex disease with known environmental and genetic risk factors. We performed a genome-wide interaction study (GWAS) of smoking and bladder cancer risk based on primary scan data from 3002 cases and 4411 controls from the National Cancer Institute Bladder Cancer GWAS. Alternative methods were used to evaluate both additive and multiplicative interactions between individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and smoking exposure. SNPs with interaction P values 〈 5 x 10(-) (5) were evaluated further in an independent dataset of 2422 bladder cancer cases and 5751 controls. We identified 10 SNPs that showed association in a consistent manner with the initial dataset and in the combined dataset, providing evidence of interaction with tobacco use. Further, two of these novel SNPs showed strong evidence of association with bladder cancer in tobacco use subgroups that approached genome-wide significance. Specifically, rs1711973 (FOXF2) on 6p25.3 was a susceptibility SNP for never smokers [combined odds ratio (OR) = 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.20-1.50, P value = 5.18 x 10(-) (7)]; and rs12216499 (RSPH3-TAGAP-EZR) on 6q25.3 was a susceptibility SNP for ever smokers (combined OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.67-0.84, P value = 6.35 x 10(-) (7)). In our analysis of smoking and bladder cancer, the tests for multiplicative interaction seemed to more commonly identify susceptibility loci with associations in never smokers, whereas the additive interaction analysis identified more loci with associations among smokers-including the known smoking and NAT2 acetylation interaction. Our findings provide additional evidence of gene-environment interactions for tobacco and bladder cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24662972
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; LUNG ; PATHWAY ; LUNG-CANCER ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; ENRICHMENT ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY LOCUS ; VARIANTS ; SNP ; statistics ; EUROPE ; SNPs ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; COMPLEMENT ; NICOTINE DEPENDENCE ; 5P15.33 ; WHOLE-GENOME
    Abstract: Pathway analysis has been proposed as a complement to single SNP analyses in GWAS. This study compared pathway analysis methods using two lung cancer GWAS data sets based on four studies: one a combined data set from Central Europe and Toronto (CETO); the other a combined data set from Germany and MD Anderson (GRMD). We searched the literature for pathway analysis methods that were widely used, representative of other methods, and had available software for performing analysis. We selected the programs EASE, which uses a modified Fishers Exact calculation to test for pathway associations, GenGen (a version of Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA)), which uses a Kolmogorov-Smirnov-like running sum statistic as the test statistic, and SLAT, which uses a p-value combination approach. We also included a modified version of the SUMSTAT method (mSUMSTAT), which tests for association by averaging chi(2) statistics from genotype association tests. There were nearly 18000 genes available for analysis, following mapping of more than 300,000 SNPs from each data set. These were mapped to 421 GO level 4 gene sets for pathway analysis. Among the methods designed to be robust to biases related to gene size and pathway SNP correlation (GenGen, mSUMSTAT and SLAT), the mSUMSTAT approach identified the most significant pathways (8 in CETO and 1 in GRMD). This included a highly plausible association for the acetylcholine receptor activity pathway in both CETO (FDR〈/=0.001) and GRMD (FDR = 0.009), although two strong association signals at a single gene cluster (CHRNA3-CHRNA5-CHRNB4) drive this result, complicating its interpretation. Few other replicated associations were found using any of these methods. Difficulty in replicating associations hindered our comparison, but results suggest mSUMSTAT has advantages over the other approaches, and may be a useful pathway analysis tool to use alongside other methods such as the commonly used GSEA (GenGen) approach.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22363742
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; IRRADIATION ; RISK ; INFECTION ; KERATINOCYTES ; ASSOCIATION ; INDUCED APOPTOSIS ; glutathione-S-transferase ; ULTRAVIOLET-RADIATION ; HPV E6 PROTEINS
    Abstract: Background. Ultraviolet radiation exposure may interact synergistically with cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Methods. To investigate differences in the risk of sunlight-associated BCC and SCC by cutaneous genus-specific HPV serostatus, a case-control study was conducted among 204 BCC and 156 SCC cases who were recruited from a university dermatology clinic and 297 controls who had no history of cancer and screened negative for current skin cancer. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between measures of sunlight exposure and BCC/SCC, stratified by genus-specific HPV serostatus, with adjustment for age and sex. Results. Sunburn due to cutaneous sensitivity to sunlight exposure (P = .006) and poor tanning ability (P = .003) were associated with a higher seroprevalence for genus beta HPV types. Poor or no tanning ability was more strongly associated with SCC among individuals who were seropositive for antibodies to cutaneous HPV types in genera alpha (OR, 15.60; 95% CI, 5.40-45.1; P = .01 for interaction) and beta (OR, 6.86; 95% CI, 3.68-12.80; P = .001 for interaction), compared with individuals who were seronegative for these HPV types. Conclusions. Seropositivity for HPV types in genera alpha or beta increased the risk of SCC associated with poor tanning ability.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22661119
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Keywords: RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; SCHIZOPHRENIA ; CROHNS-DISEASE ; ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER ; BIPOLAR DISORDER ; MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER ; Autism spectrum disorders ; DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER ; COMMON SNPS
    Abstract: Most psychiatric disorders are moderately to highly heritable. The degree to which genetic variation is unique to individual disorders or shared across disorders is unclear. To examine shared genetic etiology, we use genome-wide genotype data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) for cases and controls in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We apply univariate and bivariate methods for the estimation of genetic variation within and covariation between disorders. SNPs explained 17-29% of the variance in liability. The genetic correlation calculated using common SNPs was high between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (0.68 +/- 0.04 s.e.), moderate between schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (0.43 +/- 0.06 s.e.), bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder (0.47 +/- 0.06 s.e.), and ADHD and major depressive disorder (0.32 +/- 0.07 s.e.), low between schizophrenia and ASD (0.16 +/- 0.06 s.e.) and non-significant for other pairs of disorders as well as between psychiatric disorders and the negative control of Crohn's disease. This empirical evidence of shared genetic etiology for psychiatric disorders can inform nosology and encourages the investigation of common pathophysiologies for related disorders.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23933821
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...