Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Animals  (4)
  • *Biodiversity  (1)
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  (5)
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-03-16
    Description: Recent discoveries of large leg feathers in some theropods have implications for our understanding of the evolution of integumentary features on the avialan leg, and particularly of their relevance for the origin of avialan flight. Here we report 11 basal avialan specimens that will greatly improve our knowledge of leg integumentary features among early birds. In particular, they provide solid evidence for the existence of enlarged leg feathers on a variety of basal birds, suggest that extensively scaled feet might have appeared secondarily at an early stage in ornithuromorph evolution, and demonstrate a distal-to-proximal reduction pattern for leg feathers in avialan evolution.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zheng, Xiaoting -- Zhou, Zhonghe -- Wang, Xiaoli -- Zhang, Fucheng -- Zhang, Xiaomei -- Wang, Yan -- Wei, Guangjin -- Wang, Shuo -- Xu, Xing -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Mar 15;339(6125):1309-12. doi: 10.1126/science.1228753.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute of Geology and Paleontology, Linyi University, Linyi City, Shandong, China. ty4291666@163.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23493711" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; *Biological Evolution ; Birds/*anatomy & histology ; Feathers/*anatomy & histology ; *Fossils ; Hindlimb/*anatomy & histology ; Wings, Animal/*anatomy & histology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-11-05
    Description: The mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) protein kinase is a master growth regulator that is stimulated by amino acids. Amino acids activate the Rag guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), which promote the translocation of mTORC1 to the lysosomal surface, the site of mTORC1 activation. We found that the vacuolar H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase ATPase (v-ATPase) is necessary for amino acids to activate mTORC1. The v-ATPase engages in extensive amino acid-sensitive interactions with the Ragulator, a scaffolding complex that anchors the Rag GTPases to the lysosome. In a cell-free system, ATP hydrolysis by the v-ATPase was necessary for amino acids to regulate the v-ATPase-Ragulator interaction and promote mTORC1 translocation. Results obtained in vitro and in human cells suggest that amino acid signaling begins within the lysosomal lumen. These results identify the v-ATPase as a component of the mTOR pathway and delineate a lysosome-associated machinery for amino acid sensing.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3211112/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3211112/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zoncu, Roberto -- Bar-Peled, Liron -- Efeyan, Alejo -- Wang, Shuyu -- Sancak, Yasemin -- Sabatini, David M -- AI47389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866-07/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866-08/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI047389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI047389-11/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI047389-12/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI047389-13/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Nov 4;334(6056):678-83. doi: 10.1126/science.1207056.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Nine Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22053050" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acids/*metabolism ; Animals ; Cell Line ; Drosophila ; GTP Phosphohydrolases/metabolism ; Humans ; Lysosomes/*metabolism ; Multiprotein Complexes ; Proteins/*metabolism ; RNA Interference ; Signal Transduction ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases ; Vacuolar Proton-Translocating ATPases/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-10-09
    Description: The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the primary organelle for folding and maturation of secretory and transmembrane proteins. Inability to meet protein-folding demand leads to "ER stress," and activates IRE1alpha, an ER transmembrane kinase-endoribonuclease (RNase). IRE1alpha promotes adaptation through splicing Xbp1 mRNA or apoptosis through incompletely understood mechanisms. Here, we found that sustained IRE1alpha RNase activation caused rapid decay of select microRNAs (miRs -17, -34a, -96, and -125b) that normally repress translation of Caspase-2 mRNA, and thus sharply elevates protein levels of this initiator protease of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In cell-free systems, recombinant IRE1alpha endonucleolytically cleaved microRNA precursors at sites distinct from DICER. Thus, IRE1alpha regulates translation of a proapoptotic protein through terminating microRNA biogenesis, and noncoding RNAs are part of the ER stress response.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3742121/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3742121/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Upton, John-Paul -- Wang, Likun -- Han, Dan -- Wang, Eric S -- Huskey, Noelle E -- Lim, Lionel -- Truitt, Morgan -- McManus, Michael T -- Ruggero, Davide -- Goga, Andrei -- Papa, Feroz R -- Oakes, Scott A -- DK063720/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DP2 OD001925/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP2OD001925/OD/NIH HHS/ -- GM080783/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK063720/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA136577/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA136717/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA140456/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA154916/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK080955/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM080783/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01CA136577/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA136717/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA140456/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA154916/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01DK080955/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Nov 9;338(6108):818-22. doi: 10.1126/science.1226191. Epub 2012 Oct 4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23042294" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: 3' Untranslated Regions ; Animals ; Apoptosis ; Brefeldin A/pharmacology ; Caspase 2/*genetics/*metabolism ; Cell-Free System ; Cells, Cultured ; Cysteine Endopeptidases/*genetics/*metabolism ; Down-Regulation ; Endoplasmic Reticulum/metabolism ; *Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress ; Endoribonucleases/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Enzyme Activation ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; MicroRNAs/*metabolism ; Mutant Proteins ; Protein Biosynthesis ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; RNA Stability ; RNA, Messenger/genetics/metabolism ; Up-Regulation
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2012-06-30
    Description: Ricklefs and Renner (Reports, 27 January 2012, p. 464) found significant correlations for abundances and species diversities of families and orders of trees on different continents, which they suggested falsifies the neutral theory of biodiversity (NTB). We argue that the correlations among families and orders and the lack of correlations among genera can be explained by the NTB.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chen, Anping -- Wang, Shaopeng -- Pacala, Stephen W -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jun 29;336(6089):1639; author reply 1639. doi: 10.1126/science.1222534.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. anpingc@princeton.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22745403" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Biodiversity ; *Biological Evolution ; *Ecosystem ; *Trees
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-06-13
    Description: Blood gas and tissue pH regulation depend on the ability of the brain to sense CO2 and/or H(+) and alter breathing appropriately, a homeostatic process called central respiratory chemosensitivity. We show that selective expression of the proton-activated receptor GPR4 in chemosensory neurons of the mouse retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is required for CO2-stimulated breathing. Genetic deletion of GPR4 disrupted acidosis-dependent activation of RTN neurons, increased apnea frequency, and blunted ventilatory responses to CO2. Reintroduction of GPR4 into RTN neurons restored CO2-dependent RTN neuronal activation and rescued the ventilatory phenotype. Additional elimination of TASK-2 (K(2P)5), a pH-sensitive K(+) channel expressed in RTN neurons, essentially abolished the ventilatory response to CO2. The data identify GPR4 and TASK-2 as distinct, parallel, and essential central mediators of respiratory chemosensitivity.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kumar, Natasha N -- Velic, Ana -- Soliz, Jorge -- Shi, Yingtang -- Li, Keyong -- Wang, Sheng -- Weaver, Janelle L -- Sen, Josh -- Abbott, Stephen B G -- Lazarenko, Roman M -- Ludwig, Marie-Gabrielle -- Perez-Reyes, Edward -- Mohebbi, Nilufar -- Bettoni, Carla -- Gassmann, Max -- Suply, Thomas -- Seuwen, Klaus -- Guyenet, Patrice G -- Wagner, Carsten A -- Bayliss, Douglas A -- HL074011/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- HL108609/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jun 12;348(6240):1255-60. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa0922. Epub 2015 Jun 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA. ; Institute of Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, CH-8057, Switzerland. ; Institute of Veterinary Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, CH-8057, Switzerland. Centre de Recherche du CHU de Quebec, Departement de Pediatrie, Faculte de Medecine, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC, Canada. ; Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA. Department of Physiology, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, 050017, China. ; Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA. School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2052, Australia. Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. ; Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Basel, CH-4002, Switzerland. ; Institute of Veterinary Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, CH-8057, Switzerland. ; Institute of Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, CH-8057, Switzerland. Wagnerca@access.uzh.ch bayliss@virginia.edu. ; Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA. Wagnerca@access.uzh.ch bayliss@virginia.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26068853" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acidosis, Respiratory/genetics/physiopathology ; Animals ; Carbon Dioxide/*physiology ; Female ; Gene Deletion ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred BALB C ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Mutant Strains ; Neurons/metabolism/physiology ; Potassium Channels, Tandem Pore Domain/genetics/*physiology ; Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled/antagonists & inhibitors/genetics/*physiology ; *Respiration ; Trapezoid Body/cytology/metabolism/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...