Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Animals  (38)
  • Female  (18)
  • Amino Acid Sequence  (6)
  • Mutation  (6)
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-11-13
    Description: The innate immune response is essential for combating infectious disease. Macrophages and other cells respond to infection by releasing cytokines, such as interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), which in turn activate a well-described, myeloid-differentiation factor 88 (MYD88)-mediated, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB)-dependent transcriptional pathway that results in inflammatory-cell activation and recruitment. Endothelial cells, which usually serve as a barrier to the movement of inflammatory cells out of the blood and into tissue, are also critical mediators of the inflammatory response. Paradoxically, the cytokines vital to a successful immune defence also have disruptive effects on endothelial cell-cell interactions and can trigger degradation of barrier function and dissociation of tissue architecture. The mechanism of this barrier dissolution and its relationship to the canonical NF-kappaB pathway remain poorly defined. Here we show that the direct, immediate and disruptive effects of IL-1beta on endothelial stability in a human in vitro cell model are NF-kappaB independent and are instead the result of signalling through the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) and its activator ARF nucleotide binding site opener (ARNO; also known as CYTH2). Moreover, we show that ARNO binds directly to the adaptor protein MYD88, and thus propose MYD88-ARNO-ARF6 as a proximal IL-1beta signalling pathway distinct from that mediated by NF-kappaB. Finally, we show that SecinH3, an inhibitor of ARF guanine nucleotide-exchange factors such as ARNO, enhances vascular stability and significantly improves outcomes in animal models of inflammatory arthritis and acute inflammation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3521847/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3521847/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhu, Weiquan -- London, Nyall R -- Gibson, Christopher C -- Davis, Chadwick T -- Tong, Zongzhong -- Sorensen, Lise K -- Shi, Dallas S -- Guo, Jinping -- Smith, Matthew C P -- Grossmann, Allie H -- Thomas, Kirk R -- Li, Dean Y -- R01 CA163970/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL065648/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL084516/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HL112311/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Dec 13;492(7428):252-5. doi: 10.1038/nature11603. Epub 2012 Nov 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23143332" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: ADP-Ribosylation Factors/*metabolism ; Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology ; Animals ; Arthritis/pathology ; Cadherins/metabolism ; Capillary Permeability/drug effects ; Cell Line ; Endothelial Cells/drug effects ; Enzyme Activation/drug effects ; GTPase-Activating Proteins/*metabolism ; Humans ; Interleukin-1beta/pharmacology ; Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88/*metabolism ; NF-kappa B/metabolism ; Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology ; Protein Transport/drug effects ; Purines/pharmacology ; Receptors, Interleukin/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Thiophenes/pharmacology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-07-18
    Description: Oligodendroglia support axon survival and function through mechanisms independent of myelination, and their dysfunction leads to axon degeneration in several diseases. The cause of this degeneration has not been determined, but lack of energy metabolites such as glucose or lactate has been proposed. Lactate is transported exclusively by monocarboxylate transporters, and changes to these transporters alter lactate production and use. Here we show that the most abundant lactate transporter in the central nervous system, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1, also known as SLC16A1), is highly enriched within oligodendroglia and that disruption of this transporter produces axon damage and neuron loss in animal and cell culture models. In addition, this same transporter is reduced in patients with, and in mouse models of, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, suggesting a role for oligodendroglial MCT1 in pathogenesis. The role of oligodendroglia in axon function and neuron survival has been elusive; this study defines a new fundamental mechanism by which oligodendroglia support neurons and axons.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408792/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408792/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lee, Youngjin -- Morrison, Brett M -- Li, Yun -- Lengacher, Sylvain -- Farah, Mohamed H -- Hoffman, Paul N -- Liu, Yiting -- Tsingalia, Akivaga -- Jin, Lin -- Zhang, Ping-Wu -- Pellerin, Luc -- Magistretti, Pierre J -- Rothstein, Jeffrey D -- NS33958/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P01NS16375/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P50AG05146/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS033958/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jul 26;487(7408):443-8. doi: 10.1038/nature11314.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Neurology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22801498" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/genetics/*metabolism/*pathology ; Animals ; Axons/*metabolism/pathology ; Cell Line ; Cell Survival ; Disease Models, Animal ; Down-Regulation ; Heterozygote ; Humans ; Lactic Acid/metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Transgenic ; Monocarboxylic Acid Transporters/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Motor Neurons/metabolism/*pathology ; Myelin Sheath/metabolism ; Nerve Degeneration/*metabolism ; Oligodendroglia/*metabolism ; Protein Transport ; RNA, Small Interfering ; Superoxide Dismutase/genetics/metabolism ; Symporters/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-06-09
    Description: A fundamental feature of the mammalian neocortex is its columnar organization. In the visual cortex, functional columns consisting of neurons with similar orientation preferences have been characterized extensively, but how these columns are constructed during development remains unclear. The radial unit hypothesis posits that the ontogenetic columns formed by clonally related neurons migrating along the same radial glial fibre during corticogenesis provide the basis for functional columns in adult neocortex. However, a direct correspondence between the ontogenetic and functional columns has not been demonstrated. Here we show that, despite the lack of a discernible orientation map in mouse visual cortex, sister neurons in the same radial clone exhibit similar orientation preferences. Using a retroviral vector encoding green fluorescent protein to label radial clones of excitatory neurons, and in vivo two-photon calcium imaging to measure neuronal response properties, we found that sister neurons preferred similar orientations whereas nearby non-sister neurons showed no such relationship. Interestingly, disruption of gap junction coupling by viral expression of a dominant-negative mutant of Cx26 (also known as Gjb2) or by daily administration of a gap junction blocker, carbenoxolone, during the first postnatal week greatly diminished the functional similarity between sister neurons, suggesting that the maturation of ontogenetic into functional columns requires intercellular communication through gap junctions. Together with the recent finding of preferential excitatory connections among sister neurons, our results support the radial unit hypothesis and unify the ontogenetic and functional columns in the visual cortex.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3375857/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3375857/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Ye -- Lu, Hui -- Cheng, Pei-lin -- Ge, Shaoyu -- Xu, Huatai -- Shi, Song-Hai -- Dan, Yang -- R01 DA024681/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY018861/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS065915/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R21NS072483/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 May 2;486(7401):118-21. doi: 10.1038/nature11110.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Neurobiology, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22678292" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Animals, Newborn ; Carbenoxolone/pharmacology ; *Cell Communication ; Clone Cells/cytology ; Connexins/genetics/metabolism ; Female ; Gap Junctions/drug effects/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Models, Neurological ; Neurons/*physiology ; Visual Cortex/*cytology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-09-13
    Description: Established infections with the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV, respectively) are thought to be permanent with even the most effective immune responses and antiretroviral therapies only able to control, but not clear, these infections. Whether the residual virus that maintains these infections is vulnerable to clearance is a question of central importance to the future management of millions of HIV-infected individuals. We recently reported that approximately 50% of rhesus macaques (RM; Macaca mulatta) vaccinated with SIV protein-expressing rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV/SIV) vectors manifest durable, aviraemic control of infection with the highly pathogenic strain SIVmac239 (ref. 5). Here we show that regardless of the route of challenge, RhCMV/SIV vector-elicited immune responses control SIVmac239 after demonstrable lymphatic and haematogenous viral dissemination, and that replication-competent SIV persists in several sites for weeks to months. Over time, however, protected RM lost signs of SIV infection, showing a consistent lack of measurable plasma- or tissue-associated virus using ultrasensitive assays, and a loss of T-cell reactivity to SIV determinants not in the vaccine. Extensive ultrasensitive quantitative PCR and quantitative PCR with reverse transcription analyses of tissues from RhCMV/SIV vector-protected RM necropsied 69-172 weeks after challenge did not detect SIV RNA or DNA sequences above background levels, and replication-competent SIV was not detected in these RM by extensive co-culture analysis of tissues or by adoptive transfer of 60 million haematolymphoid cells to naive RM. These data provide compelling evidence for progressive clearance of a pathogenic lentiviral infection, and suggest that some lentiviral reservoirs may be susceptible to the continuous effector memory T-cell-mediated immune surveillance elicited and maintained by cytomegalovirus vectors.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3849456/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3849456/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hansen, Scott G -- Piatak, Michael Jr -- Ventura, Abigail B -- Hughes, Colette M -- Gilbride, Roxanne M -- Ford, Julia C -- Oswald, Kelli -- Shoemaker, Rebecca -- Li, Yuan -- Lewis, Matthew S -- Gilliam, Awbrey N -- Xu, Guangwu -- Whizin, Nathan -- Burwitz, Benjamin J -- Planer, Shannon L -- Turner, John M -- Legasse, Alfred W -- Axthelm, Michael K -- Nelson, Jay A -- Fruh, Klaus -- Sacha, Jonah B -- Estes, Jacob D -- Keele, Brandon F -- Edlefsen, Paul T -- Lifson, Jeffrey D -- Picker, Louis J -- HHSN261200800001E/PHS HHS/ -- P01 AI094417/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P51OD011092/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI060392/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 DE021291/DE/NIDCR NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI054292/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI095985/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI096109/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U24 OD010850/OD/NIH HHS/ -- U42 OD010426/OD/NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Oct 3;502(7469):100-4. doi: 10.1038/nature12519. Epub 2013 Sep 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute and Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24025770" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cytomegalovirus/genetics/immunology ; Female ; Macaca mulatta ; Male ; Molecular Sequence Data ; SAIDS Vaccines/*immunology ; Simian Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/*prevention & control/virology ; Simian Immunodeficiency Virus/*immunology ; Time Factors ; Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology ; Viral Load ; Virus Replication/physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-11-11
    Description: Lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components by autophagy is essential for cellular survival and homeostasis under nutrient-deprived conditions. Acute regulation of autophagy by nutrient-sensing kinases is well defined, but longer-term transcriptional regulation is relatively unknown. Here we show that the fed-state sensing nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the fasting transcriptional activator cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) coordinately regulate the hepatic autophagy gene network. Pharmacological activation of FXR repressed many autophagy genes and inhibited autophagy even in fasted mice, and feeding-mediated inhibition of macroautophagy was attenuated in FXR-knockout mice. From mouse liver chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing data, FXR and CREB binding peaks were detected at 178 and 112 genes, respectively, out of 230 autophagy-related genes, and 78 genes showed shared binding, mostly in their promoter regions. CREB promoted autophagic degradation of lipids, or lipophagy, under nutrient-deprived conditions, and FXR inhibited this response. Mechanistically, CREB upregulated autophagy genes, including Atg7, Ulk1 and Tfeb, by recruiting the coactivator CRTC2. After feeding or pharmacological activation, FXR trans-repressed these genes by disrupting the functional CREB-CRTC2 complex. This study identifies the new FXR-CREB axis as a key physiological switch regulating autophagy, resulting in sustained nutrient regulation of autophagy during feeding/fasting cycles.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4257899/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4257899/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Seok, Sunmi -- Fu, Ting -- Choi, Sung-E -- Li, Yang -- Zhu, Rong -- Kumar, Subodh -- Sun, Xiaoxiao -- Yoon, Gyesoon -- Kang, Yup -- Zhong, Wenxuan -- Ma, Jian -- Kemper, Byron -- Kemper, Jongsook Kim -- DK62777/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK95842/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK062777/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK095842/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Dec 4;516(7529):108-11. doi: 10.1038/nature13949. Epub 2014 Nov 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; 1] Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA [2] Institute for Medical Science, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 442-749, Korea. ; Department of Bioengineering and the Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; Department of Statistics, University of Georgia, Athens, Gerogia 30602, USA. ; Institute for Medical Science, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 442-749, Korea.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25383523" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Autophagy/*genetics ; Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein/*metabolism ; Fasting/physiology ; *Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects ; Isoxazoles/pharmacology ; Liver/cytology/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Protein Binding ; Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear/agonists/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-03-05
    Description: Recognition of modified histones by 'reader' proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of chromatin. H3K36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) is deposited onto the nucleosomes in the transcribed regions after RNA polymerase II elongation. In yeast, this mark in turn recruits epigenetic regulators to reset the chromatin to a relatively repressive state, thus suppressing cryptic transcription. However, much less is known about the role of H3K36me3 in transcription regulation in mammals. This is further complicated by the transcription-coupled incorporation of the histone variant H3.3 in gene bodies. Here we show that the candidate tumour suppressor ZMYND11 specifically recognizes H3K36me3 on H3.3 (H3.3K36me3) and regulates RNA polymerase II elongation. Structural studies show that in addition to the trimethyl-lysine binding by an aromatic cage within the PWWP domain, the H3.3-dependent recognition is mediated by the encapsulation of the H3.3-specific 'Ser 31' residue in a composite pocket formed by the tandem bromo-PWWP domains of ZMYND11. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing shows a genome-wide co-localization of ZMYND11 with H3K36me3 and H3.3 in gene bodies, and its occupancy requires the pre-deposition of H3.3K36me3. Although ZMYND11 is associated with highly expressed genes, it functions as an unconventional transcription co-repressor by modulating RNA polymerase II at the elongation stage. ZMYND11 is critical for the repression of a transcriptional program that is essential for tumour cell growth; low expression levels of ZMYND11 in breast cancer patients correlate with worse prognosis. Consistently, overexpression of ZMYND11 suppresses cancer cell growth in vitro and tumour formation in mice. Together, this study identifies ZMYND11 as an H3.3-specific reader of H3K36me3 that links the histone-variant-mediated transcription elongation control to tumour suppression.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wen, Hong -- Li, Yuanyuan -- Xi, Yuanxin -- Jiang, Shiming -- Stratton, Sabrina -- Peng, Danni -- Tanaka, Kaori -- Ren, Yongfeng -- Xia, Zheng -- Wu, Jun -- Li, Bing -- Barton, Michelle C -- Li, Wei -- Li, Haitao -- Shi, Xiaobing -- CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 10;508(7495):263-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13045. Epub 2014 Mar 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3]. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [3]. ; 1] Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2]. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Genes and Development Graduate Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Teaxs 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590075" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Breast Neoplasms/*genetics/metabolism/*pathology ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Chromatin/genetics/metabolism ; Co-Repressor Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disease-Free Survival ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Histones/chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Lysine/*metabolism ; Methylation ; Mice ; Mice, Nude ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Oncogenes/genetics ; Prognosis ; Protein Binding ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; RNA Polymerase II/*metabolism ; Substrate Specificity ; *Transcription Elongation, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-02-21
    Description: Crohn's disease is a debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can involve the entire digestive tract. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) encoding a missense variant in the autophagy gene ATG16L1 (rs2241880, Thr300Ala) is strongly associated with the incidence of Crohn's disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated the effect of ATG16L1 deletion or deficiency; however, the molecular consequences of the Thr300Ala (T300A) variant remains unknown. Here we show that amino acids 296-299 constitute a caspase cleavage motif in ATG16L1 and that the T300A variant (T316A in mice) significantly increases ATG16L1 sensitization to caspase-3-mediated processing. We observed that death-receptor activation or starvation-induced metabolic stress in human and murine macrophages increased degradation of the T300A or T316A variants of ATG16L1, respectively, resulting in diminished autophagy. Knock-in mice harbouring the T316A variant showed defective clearance of the ileal pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica and an elevated inflammatory cytokine response. In turn, deletion of the caspase-3-encoding gene, Casp3, or elimination of the caspase cleavage site by site-directed mutagenesis rescued starvation-induced autophagy and pathogen clearance, respectively. These findings demonstrate that caspase 3 activation in the presence of a common risk allele leads to accelerated degradation of ATG16L1, placing cellular stress, apoptotic stimuli and impaired autophagy in a unified pathway that predisposes to Crohn's disease.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Murthy, Aditya -- Li, Yun -- Peng, Ivan -- Reichelt, Mike -- Katakam, Anand Kumar -- Noubade, Rajkumar -- Roose-Girma, Merone -- DeVoss, Jason -- Diehl, Lauri -- Graham, Robert R -- van Lookeren Campagne, Menno -- England -- Nature. 2014 Feb 27;506(7489):456-62. doi: 10.1038/nature13044. Epub 2014 Feb 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Immunology, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; ITGR Human Genetics, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24553140" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Animals ; Autophagy/genetics ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/*genetics/*metabolism ; Caspase 3/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Cell Line ; Cells, Cultured ; Crohn Disease/*genetics/pathology ; Cytokines/immunology ; Enzyme Activation ; Female ; Food Deprivation ; Humans ; Macrophages/immunology/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mutagenesis, Site-Directed ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/*genetics ; *Proteolysis ; Stress, Physiological ; Yersinia enterocolitica/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2015-07-16
    Description: Mitochondria have a major role in energy production via oxidative phosphorylation, which is dependent on the expression of critical genes encoded by mitochondrial (mt)DNA. Mutations in mtDNA can cause fatal or severely debilitating disorders with limited treatment options. Clinical manifestations vary based on mutation type and heteroplasmy (that is, the relative levels of mutant and wild-type mtDNA within each cell). Here we generated genetically corrected pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) from patients with mtDNA disease. Multiple induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines were derived from patients with common heteroplasmic mutations including 3243A〉G, causing mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), and 8993T〉G and 13513G〉A, implicated in Leigh syndrome. Isogenic MELAS and Leigh syndrome iPS cell lines were generated containing exclusively wild-type or mutant mtDNA through spontaneous segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA in proliferating fibroblasts. Furthermore, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) enabled replacement of mutant mtDNA from homoplasmic 8993T〉G fibroblasts to generate corrected Leigh-NT1 PSCs. Although Leigh-NT1 PSCs contained donor oocyte wild-type mtDNA (human haplotype D4a) that differed from Leigh syndrome patient haplotype (F1a) at a total of 47 nucleotide sites, Leigh-NT1 cells displayed transcriptomic profiles similar to those in embryo-derived PSCs carrying wild-type mtDNA, indicative of normal nuclear-to-mitochondrial interactions. Moreover, genetically rescued patient PSCs displayed normal metabolic function compared to impaired oxygen consumption and ATP production observed in mutant cells. We conclude that both reprogramming approaches offer complementary strategies for derivation of PSCs containing exclusively wild-type mtDNA, through spontaneous segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA in individual iPS cell lines or mitochondrial replacement by SCNT in homoplasmic mtDNA-based disease.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ma, Hong -- Folmes, Clifford D L -- Wu, Jun -- Morey, Robert -- Mora-Castilla, Sergio -- Ocampo, Alejandro -- Ma, Li -- Poulton, Joanna -- Wang, Xinjian -- Ahmed, Riffat -- Kang, Eunju -- Lee, Yeonmi -- Hayama, Tomonari -- Li, Ying -- Van Dyken, Crystal -- Gutierrez, Nuria Marti -- Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca -- Koski, Amy -- Mitalipov, Nargiz -- Amato, Paula -- Wolf, Don P -- Huang, Taosheng -- Terzic, Andre -- Laurent, Louise C -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- Mitalipov, Shoukhrat -- England -- Nature. 2015 Aug 13;524(7564):234-8. doi: 10.1038/nature14546. Epub 2015 Jul 15.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health &Science University, 3303 S.W. Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive &Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health &Science University, 505 N.W. 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; Center for Regenerative Medicine and Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. ; Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. ; Division of Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA. ; Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. ; Division of Reproductive &Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health &Science University, 505 N.W. 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26176921" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism ; Animals ; Cell Line ; DNA, Mitochondrial/*genetics ; Embryo, Mammalian/cytology ; Fibroblasts/cytology/metabolism/pathology ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Haplotypes/genetics ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/*metabolism ; Leigh Disease/genetics/metabolism/pathology ; Mice ; Mitochondria/*genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Mitochondrial Diseases/*genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathies/genetics/metabolism/pathology ; Mutation/genetics ; Nuclear Transfer Techniques ; Nucleotides/genetics ; Oxygen Consumption ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, RNA ; Skin/cytology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2016-03-24
    Description: Primary cilia are solitary, generally non-motile, hair-like protrusions that extend from the surface of cells between cell divisions. Their antenna-like structure leads naturally to the assumption that they sense the surrounding environment, the most common hypothesis being sensation of mechanical force through calcium-permeable ion channels within the cilium. This Ca(2+)-responsive mechanosensor hypothesis for primary cilia has been invoked to explain a large range of biological responses, from control of left-right axis determination in embryonic development to adult progression of polycystic kidney disease and some cancers. Here we report the complete lack of mechanically induced calcium increases in primary cilia, in tissues upon which this hypothesis has been based. We developed a transgenic mouse, Arl13b-mCherry-GECO1.2, expressing a ratiometric genetically encoded calcium indicator in all primary cilia. We then measured responses to flow in primary cilia of cultured kidney epithelial cells, kidney thick ascending tubules, crown cells of the embryonic node, kinocilia of inner ear hair cells, and several cell lines. Cilia-specific Ca(2+) influxes were not observed in physiological or even highly supraphysiological levels of fluid flow. We conclude that mechanosensation, if it originates in primary cilia, is not via calcium signalling.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851444/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851444/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Delling, M -- Indzhykulian, A A -- Liu, X -- Li, Y -- Xie, T -- Corey, D P -- Clapham, D E -- 5R01 DC000304/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/ -- P30-HD 18655/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 DC000304/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 31;531(7596):656-60. doi: 10.1038/nature17426. Epub 2016 Mar 23.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cardiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Image and Data Analysis Core (IDAC), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27007841" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Calcium/analysis/*metabolism ; Calcium Signaling ; Cilia/*metabolism ; Embryo, Mammalian/cytology ; Epithelial Cells/cytology ; Female ; Hair Cells, Auditory, Inner/cytology ; Kidney/cytology ; Male ; *Mechanotransduction, Cellular ; Mice ; Mice, Transgenic ; Models, Biological
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2011-08-27
    Description: Uterine leiomyomas, or fibroids, are benign tumors that affect millions of women worldwide and that can cause considerable morbidity. To study the genetic basis of this tumor type, we examined 18 uterine leiomyomas derived from 17 different patients by exome sequencing and identified tumor-specific mutations in the mediator complex subunit 12 (MED12) gene in 10. Through analysis of 207 additional tumors, we determined that MED12 is altered in 70% (159 of 225) of tumors from a total of 80 patients. The Mediator complex is a 26-subunit transcriptional regulator that bridges DNA regulatory sequences to the RNA polymerase II initiation complex. All mutations resided in exon 2, suggesting that aberrant function of this region of MED12 contributes to tumorigenesis.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Makinen, Netta -- Mehine, Miika -- Tolvanen, Jaana -- Kaasinen, Eevi -- Li, Yilong -- Lehtonen, Heli J -- Gentile, Massimiliano -- Yan, Jian -- Enge, Martin -- Taipale, Minna -- Aavikko, Mervi -- Katainen, Riku -- Virolainen, Elina -- Bohling, Tom -- Koski, Taru A -- Launonen, Virpi -- Sjoberg, Jari -- Taipale, Jussi -- Vahteristo, Pia -- Aaltonen, Lauri A -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Oct 14;334(6053):252-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1208930. Epub 2011 Aug 25.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Medical Genetics, Genome-Scale Biology Research Program, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21868628" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Codon ; Exons ; Female ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Humans ; INDEL Mutation ; Introns ; Leiomyoma/*genetics/metabolism ; Mediator Complex/*genetics ; Mutation ; Mutation, Missense ; Signal Transduction ; Uterine Neoplasms/*genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...