Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-05-28
    Description: Fusing left and right eye images into a single view is dependent on precise ocular alignment, which relies on coordinated eye movements. During movements of the head this alignment is maintained by numerous reflexes. Although rodents share with other mammals the key components of eye movement control, the coordination of eye movements in freely moving rodents is unknown. Here we show that movements of the two eyes in freely moving rats differ fundamentally from the precisely controlled eye movements used by other mammals to maintain continuous binocular fusion. The observed eye movements serve to keep the visual fields of the two eyes continuously overlapping above the animal during free movement, but not continuously aligned. Overhead visual stimuli presented to rats freely exploring an open arena evoke an immediate shelter-seeking behaviour, but are ineffective when presented beside the arena. We suggest that continuously overlapping visual fields overhead would be of evolutionary benefit for predator detection by minimizing blind spots.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wallace, Damian J -- Greenberg, David S -- Sawinski, Juergen -- Rulla, Stefanie -- Notaro, Giuseppe -- Kerr, Jason N D -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jun 6;498(7452):65-9. doi: 10.1038/nature12153. Epub 2013 May 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Network Imaging Group, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Spemannstrasse 41, 72076 Tubingen, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23708965" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Escape Reaction/physiology ; Exploratory Behavior/physiology ; Eye Movements/physiology ; Head/physiology ; Models, Biological ; Movement/physiology ; Optic Disk/physiology ; Predatory Behavior ; Rats ; Retina/physiology ; Vision, Binocular/*physiology ; Visual Fields/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-12-15
    Description: Individual variation in social behavior seems ubiquitous, but we know little about how it relates to brain diversity. Among monogamous prairie voles, levels of vasopressin receptor (encoded by the gene avpr1a) in brain regions related to spatial memory predict male space use and sexual fidelity in the field. We find that trade-offs between the benefits of male fidelity and infidelity are reflected in patterns of territorial intrusion, offspring paternity, avpr1a expression, and the evolutionary fitness of alternative avpr1a alleles. DNA variation at the avpr1a locus includes polymorphisms that reliably predict the epigenetic status and neural expression of avpr1a, and patterns of DNA diversity demonstrate that avpr1a regulatory variation has been favored by selection. In prairie voles, trade-offs in the fitness consequences of social behaviors seem to promote neuronal and molecular diversity.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Okhovat, Mariam -- Berrio, Alejandro -- Wallace, Gerard -- Ophir, Alexander G -- Phelps, Steven M -- R21 HD059092/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Dec 11;350(6266):1371-4. doi: 10.1126/science.aac5791.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Campus Code C0930, Austin, TX 78712, USA. ; Department of Psychology, Cornell University, 224 Uris Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. ; Department of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Campus Code C0930, Austin, TX 78712, USA. sphelps@mail.utexas.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26659055" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Animals ; Arvicolinae/genetics/metabolism/*psychology ; Biological Evolution ; Brain/*metabolism ; DNA/genetics ; Epigenesis, Genetic ; Female ; Grassland ; Male ; Polymorphism, Genetic ; Receptors, Vasopressin/genetics/*metabolism ; Sexual Behavior/*physiology ; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology ; *Social Behavior ; Spatial Memory/*physiology ; Territoriality
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-04-12
    Description: Obtaining high-resolution information from a complex system, while maintaining the global perspective needed to understand system function, represents a key challenge in biology. Here we address this challenge with a method (termed CLARITY) for the transformation of intact tissue into a nanoporous hydrogel-hybridized form (crosslinked to a three-dimensional network of hydrophilic polymers) that is fully assembled but optically transparent and macromolecule-permeable. Using mouse brains, we show intact-tissue imaging of long-range projections, local circuit wiring, cellular relationships, subcellular structures, protein complexes, nucleic acids and neurotransmitters. CLARITY also enables intact-tissue in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry with multiple rounds of staining and de-staining in non-sectioned tissue, and antibody labelling throughout the intact adult mouse brain. Finally, we show that CLARITY enables fine structural analysis of clinical samples, including non-sectioned human tissue from a neuropsychiatric-disease setting, establishing a path for the transmutation of human tissue into a stable, intact and accessible form suitable for probing structural and molecular underpinnings of physiological function and disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4092167/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4092167/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chung, Kwanghun -- Wallace, Jenelle -- Kim, Sung-Yon -- Kalyanasundaram, Sandhiya -- Andalman, Aaron S -- Davidson, Thomas J -- Mirzabekov, Julie J -- Zalocusky, Kelly A -- Mattis, Joanna -- Denisin, Aleksandra K -- Pak, Sally -- Bernstein, Hannah -- Ramakrishnan, Charu -- Grosenick, Logan -- Gradinaru, Viviana -- Deisseroth, Karl -- DP1 OD000616/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA020794/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH099647/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 May 16;497(7449):332-7. doi: 10.1038/nature12107. Epub 2013 Apr 10.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23575631" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Brain/*anatomy & histology ; Cross-Linking Reagents/chemistry ; Formaldehyde/chemistry ; Humans ; Hydrogel/chemistry ; Imaging, Three-Dimensional/*methods ; In Situ Hybridization/methods ; Lipids/isolation & purification ; Mice ; Molecular Imaging/*methods ; Permeability ; Phenotype ; Scattering, Radiation
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-06-06
    Description: Skinner and colleagues (Research Article, 23 January 2015, p. 395), based on metacarpal trabecular bone structure, argue that Australopithecus africanus employed human-like dexterity for stone tool making and use 3 million years ago. However, their evolutionary and biological assumptions are misinformed, failing to refute the previously existing hypothesis that human-like manipulation preceded systematized stone tool manufacture, as indicated by the fossil record.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Almecija, Sergio -- Wallace, Ian J -- Judex, Stefan -- Alba, David M -- Moya-Sola, Salvador -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jun 5;348(6239):1101. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa8414.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA. Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University, Science and Engineering Hall, 800 22nd Street NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA. Institut Catala de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici ICTA-ICP, Carrer de les Columnes s/n, Campus de la UAB, 08193 Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona, Spain. sergio.almecija@gmail.com. ; Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA. ; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA. ; Institut Catala de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici ICTA-ICP, Carrer de les Columnes s/n, Campus de la UAB, 08193 Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona, Spain. ; ICREA at Institut Catala de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont and Unitat d'Antropologia Biologica (Departament BABVE), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici ICTA-CP, Carrer de les Columnes s/n, Campus de la UAB, 08193 Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona, Spain.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26045428" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; *Biological Evolution ; Humans ; Metacarpal Bones/*anatomy & histology ; Metacarpus/*anatomy & histology ; Thumb/*anatomy & histology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-06-06
    Description: An analysis of present-day global depth distributions of reef-building corals and underlying environmental drivers contradicts a commonly held belief that ocean warming will promote tropical coral expansion into temperate latitudes. Using a global data set of a major group of reef corals, we found that corals were confined to shallower depths at higher latitudes (up to 0.6 meters of predicted shallowing per additional degree of latitude). Latitudinal attenuation of the most important driver of this phenomenon-the dose of photosynthetically available radiation over winter-would severely constrain latitudinal coral range extension in response to ocean warming. Latitudinal gradients in species richness for the group also suggest that higher winter irradiance at depth in low latitudes allowed a deep-water fauna that was not viable at higher latitudes.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Muir, Paul R -- Wallace, Carden C -- Done, Terence -- Aguirre, J David -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jun 5;348(6239):1135-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1259911.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Museum of Tropical Queensland, Townsville, Queensland 4810, Australia. paul.muir@qm.qld.gov.au. ; Museum of Tropical Queensland, Townsville, Queensland 4810, Australia. ; Museum of Tropical Queensland, Townsville, Queensland 4810, Australia. Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB #3, Townsville MC, Queensland 4810, Australia. ; Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Albany, New Zealand. School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26045436" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anthozoa/*growth & development ; *Coral Reefs ; Datasets as Topic ; *Hot Temperature ; Seasons ; *Sunlight
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-11-29
    Description: Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) is among the most poisonous substances on Earth and a major cause of neonatal death in nonvaccinated areas. TeNT targets the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) with high affinity, yet the nature of the TeNT receptor complex remains unknown. Here, we show that the presence of nidogens (also known as entactins) at the NMJ is the main determinant for TeNT binding. Inhibition of the TeNT-nidogen interaction by using small nidogen-derived peptides or genetic ablation of nidogens prevented the binding of TeNT to neurons and protected mice from TeNT-induced spastic paralysis. Our findings demonstrate the direct involvement of an extracellular matrix protein as a receptor for TeNT at the NMJ, paving the way for the development of therapeutics for the prevention of tetanus by targeting this protein-protein interaction.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Bercsenyi, Kinga -- Schmieg, Nathalie -- Bryson, J Barney -- Wallace, Martin -- Caccin, Paola -- Golding, Matthew -- Zanotti, Giuseppe -- Greensmith, Linda -- Nischt, Roswitha -- Schiavo, Giampietro -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Nov 28;346(6213):1118-23. doi: 10.1126/science.1258138.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Molecular Neuropathobiology Laboratory, Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, 44 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY, UK. Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, University College London Institute of Neurology, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK. ; Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, University College London Institute of Neurology, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK. ; Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Padua, Viale G. Colombo 3, 35131 Padova, Italy. ; Molecular Neuropathobiology Laboratory, Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, 44 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY, UK. ; Department of Dermatology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Strasse 62, 50937 Cologne, Germany. ; Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, University College London Institute of Neurology, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK. giampietro.schiavo@ucl.ac.uk.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25430769" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Membrane Glycoproteins/antagonists & inhibitors/genetics/*metabolism ; Metalloendopeptidases/antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/*therapeutic use ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred Strains ; Motor Neurons/*drug effects/metabolism ; Neuromuscular Junction/*drug effects/metabolism ; Peptides/pharmacology ; Protein Binding ; Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs ; Tetanus/*prevention & control ; Tetanus Toxin/antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/*therapeutic use
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...