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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-07-17
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chown, S L -- Lee, J E -- Hughes, K A -- Barnes, J -- Barrett, P J -- Bergstrom, D M -- Convey, P -- Cowan, D A -- Crosbie, K -- Dyer, G -- Frenot, Y -- Grant, S M -- Herr, D -- Kennicutt, M C 2nd -- Lamers, M -- Murray, A -- Possingham, H P -- Reid, K -- Riddle, M J -- Ryan, P G -- Sanson, L -- Shaw, J D -- Sparrow, M D -- Summerhayes, C -- Terauds, A -- Wall, D H -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jul 13;337(6091):158-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1222821.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Centre for Invasion Biology, Stellenbosch University, Matieland, South Africa. steven.chown@monash.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22798586" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antarctic Regions ; Climate Change ; *Conservation of Natural Resources/trends ; *Ecosystem ; Forecasting ; Human Activities ; Humans ; Public Policy ; Travel
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-06-08
    Description: Sexual signals are often complex and perceived by multiple senses. How animals integrate signal components across sensory modalities can influence signal evolution. Here we show that two relatively unattractive signals that are perceived acoustically and visually can be combined in a pattern to form a signal that is attractive to female tungara frogs. Such unanticipated perceptual effects suggest that the evolution of complex signals can occur by alteration of the relationships among already-existing traits.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Taylor, R C -- Ryan, M J -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Jul 19;341(6143):273-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1237113. Epub 2013 Jun 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biology, Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD 21801, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23744778" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anura/*physiology ; Female ; Male ; *Mating Preference, Animal ; *Vocalization, Animal
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-01-25
    Description: Animal displays are often perceived by intended and unintended receivers in more than one sensory system. In addition, cues that are an incidental consequence of signal production can also be perceived by different receivers, even when the receivers use different sensory systems to perceive them. Here we show that the vocal responses of male tungara frogs (Physalaemus pustulosus) increase twofold when call-induced water ripples are added to the acoustic component of a rival's call. Hunting bats (Trachops cirrhosus) can echolocate this signal by-product and prefer to attack model frogs when ripples are added to the acoustic component of the call. This study illustrates how the perception of a signal by-product by intended and unintended receivers through different sensory systems generates both costs and benefits for the signaler.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Halfwerk, W -- Jones, P L -- Taylor, R C -- Ryan, M J -- Page, R A -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jan 24;343(6169):413-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1244812.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 0843-03092, Balboa, Ancon, Republic of Panama.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24458640" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anura/*physiology ; *Auditory Perception ; Chiroptera/*physiology ; *Courtship ; *Echolocation ; Female ; Male ; *Mating Preference, Animal ; Sound ; *Vibration ; *Vocalization, Animal ; Water
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-05-24
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rocha, L A -- Aleixo, A -- Allen, G -- Almeda, F -- Baldwin, C C -- Barclay, M V L -- Bates, J M -- Bauer, A M -- Benzoni, F -- Berns, C M -- Berumen, M L -- Blackburn, D C -- Blum, S -- Bolanos, F -- Bowie, R C K -- Britz, R -- Brown, R M -- Cadena, C D -- Carpenter, K -- Ceriaco, L M -- Chakrabarty, P -- Chaves, G -- Choat, J H -- Clements, K D -- Collette, B B -- Collins, A -- Coyne, J -- Cracraft, J -- Daniel, T -- de Carvalho, M R -- de Queiroz, K -- Di Dario, F -- Drewes, R -- Dumbacher, J P -- Engilis, A Jr -- Erdmann, M V -- Eschmeyer, W -- Feldman, C R -- Fisher, B L -- Fjeldsa, J -- Fritsch, P W -- Fuchs, J -- Getahun, A -- Gill, A -- Gomon, M -- Gosliner, T -- Graves, G R -- Griswold, C E -- Guralnick, R -- Hartel, K -- Helgen, K M -- Ho, H -- Iskandar, D T -- Iwamoto, T -- Jaafar, Z -- James, H F -- Johnson, D -- Kavanaugh, D -- Knowlton, N -- Lacey, E -- Larson, H K -- Last, P -- Leis, J M -- Lessios, H -- Liebherr, J -- Lowman, M -- Mahler, D L -- Mamonekene, V -- Matsuura, K -- Mayer, G C -- Mays, H Jr -- McCosker, J -- McDiarmid, R W -- McGuire, J -- Miller, M J -- Mooi, R -- Mooi, R D -- Moritz, C -- Myers, P -- Nachman, M W -- Nussbaum, R A -- Foighil, D O -- Parenti, L R -- Parham, J F -- Paul, E -- Paulay, G -- Perez-Eman, J -- Perez-Matus, A -- Poe, S -- Pogonoski, J -- Rabosky, D L -- Randall, J E -- Reimer, J D -- Robertson, D R -- Rodel, M-O -- Rodrigues, M T -- Roopnarine, P -- Ruber, L -- Ryan, M J -- Sheldon, F -- Shinohara, G -- Short, A -- Simison, W B -- Smith-Vaniz, W F -- Springer, V G -- Stiassny, M -- Tello, J G -- Thompson, C W -- Trnski, T -- Tucker, P -- Valqui, T -- Vecchione, M -- Verheyen, E -- Wainwright, P C -- Wheeler, T A -- White, W T -- Will, K -- Williams, J T -- Williams, G -- Wilson, E O -- Winker, K -- Winterbottom, R -- Witt, C C -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 May 23;344(6186):814-5. doi: 10.1126/science.344.6186.814.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, CA 94118, USA. LRocha@calacademy.org. ; Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi, Belem, PA, 66040-170, Brazil. ; Western Australian Museum, Perth, WA, 6986, Australia. ; California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, CA 94118, USA. ; Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560, USA. ; Natural History Museum, London, SW7 5BD, UK. ; Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL 60605, USA. ; Villanova University, Villanova, PA 19085, USA. ; University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, 20126, Italy. ; Utica College, Utica, NY 13502, USA. ; King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, 23955, Saudi Arabia. ; Universidad de Costa Rica, San Jose, 11501-2060, Costa Rica. ; University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3161, USA. ; University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA. ; Universidad de los Andes, Bogota, 4976, Colombia. ; Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529, USA. ; Museu Nacional de Historia Natural e da Ciencia, Lisbon, 7005-638, Portugal. ; Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. ; James Cook University, Townsville, 4811, Australia. ; University of Auckland, Auckland, 1142, New Zealand. ; NOAA Systematics Laboratory, Washington, DC 20013, USA. ; University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. ; American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024, USA. ; Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, 05508-090, Brazil. ; Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Macae, RJ, 27965-045, Brazil. ; University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. ; Conservation International, Denpasar, Bali, 80235, Indonesia. ; University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557-0314, USA. ; Natural History Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen, DK-2100, Denmark. ; Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, 75005, France. ; Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, 1176, Ethiopia. ; University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia. ; Museum Victoria, Melbourne, 3001, VIC, Australia. ; University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0334, USA. ; Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. ; Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560, USA. National University of Singapore, 117543, Singapore. ; Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin, 0820, NT, Australia. ; CSIRO Marine & Atmospheric Research, Hobart, TAS, 7000, Australia. ; Australian Museum, Sydney, NSW, 2010, Australia. ; Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Balboa, 0843-03092, Panama. ; Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. ; Universite Marien Ngouabi, Brazzaville, B.P. 69, Republic of Congo. ; National Museum of Nature and Science, Tsukuba, 305-0005, Japan. ; University of Wisconsin-Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53141-2000, USA. ; Cincinnati Museum Center, Cincinnati, OH 45203, USA. ; The Manitoba Museum, Winnipeg, MB, R3B 0N2, Canada. ; Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, 0200, Australia. ; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1079, USA. ; California State University, Fullerton, CA 92831, USA. ; The Ornithological Council, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. ; University of Florida, Gainesville, fl32611, USA. ; Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas, 1041, Venezuela. ; Pontif cia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago 6513677, Chile. ; University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA. ; Bernice P. Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI 96817, USA. ; University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, 903-0213, Japan. ; Museum fur Naturkunde, Berlin, 10115, Germany. ; Naturhistorisches Museum der Burgergemeinde Bern, Bern, CH-3005, Switzerland. ; American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024, USA. Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY 11201-8423, USA. ; Auckland Museum, Auckland, 1142, New Zealand. ; Centro de Ornitologia y Biodiversidad, Lima, 33, Peru. ; Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Brussels, 1000, Belgium. ; McGill University, Montreal, QC, H9X 3V9, Canada. ; University of Alaska Museum, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA. ; Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, ON, M5S 2C6, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24855245" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Biology/*methods ; Classification/*methods ; *Endangered Species ; *Extinction, Biological
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-10-29
    Description: Cytotoxic chemotherapy targets elements common to all nucleated human cells, such as DNA and microtubules, yet it selectively kills tumor cells. Here we show that clinical response to these drugs correlates with, and may be partially governed by, the pretreatment proximity of tumor cell mitochondria to the apoptotic threshold, a property called mitochondrial priming. We used BH3 profiling to measure priming in tumor cells from patients with multiple myeloma, acute myelogenous and lymphoblastic leukemia, and ovarian cancer. This assay measures mitochondrial response to peptides derived from proapoptotic BH3 domains of proteins critical for death signaling to mitochondria. Patients with highly primed cancers exhibited superior clinical response to chemotherapy. In contrast, chemoresistant cancers and normal tissues were poorly primed. Manipulation of mitochondrial priming might enhance the efficacy of cytotoxic agents.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3280949/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3280949/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ni Chonghaile, Triona -- Sarosiek, Kristopher A -- Vo, Thanh-Trang -- Ryan, Jeremy A -- Tammareddi, Anupama -- Moore, Victoria Del Gaizo -- Deng, Jing -- Anderson, Kenneth C -- Richardson, Paul -- Tai, Yu-Tzu -- Mitsiades, Constantine S -- Matulonis, Ursula A -- Drapkin, Ronny -- Stone, Richard -- Deangelo, Daniel J -- McConkey, David J -- Sallan, Stephen E -- Silverman, Lewis -- Hirsch, Michelle S -- Carrasco, Daniel Ruben -- Letai, Anthony -- P01CA068484/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01CA139980/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129974/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129974-05/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA129974/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Nov 25;334(6059):1129-33. doi: 10.1126/science.1206727. Epub 2011 Oct 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22033517" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Aged ; Animals ; Antineoplastic Agents/*therapeutic use ; *Apoptosis ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation ; Child ; Disease-Free Survival ; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm ; Female ; Humans ; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/drug therapy/physiopathology ; Male ; Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Middle Aged ; Mitochondria/*physiology ; Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy/physiopathology ; Neoplasms/*drug therapy/*physiopathology ; Ovarian Neoplasms/drug therapy/physiopathology ; Peptide Fragments/metabolism ; Permeability ; Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/drug therapy/physiopathology ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2/chemistry/metabolism ; Remission Induction ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2011-03-29
    Description: CD4(+) T helper lymphocytes that express interleukin-17 (T(H)17 cells) have critical roles in mouse models of autoimmunity, and there is mounting evidence that they also influence inflammatory processes in humans. Genome-wide association studies in humans have linked genes involved in T(H)17 cell differentiation and function with susceptibility to Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis. Thus, the pathway towards differentiation of T(H)17 cells and, perhaps, of related innate lymphoid cells with similar effector functions, is an attractive target for therapeutic applications. Mouse and human T(H)17 cells are distinguished by expression of the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor RORgammat, which is required for induction of IL-17 transcription and for the manifestation of T(H)17-dependent autoimmune disease in mice. By performing a chemical screen with an insect cell-based reporter system, we identified the cardiac glycoside digoxin as a specific inhibitor of RORgammat transcriptional activity. Digoxin inhibited murine T(H)17 cell differentiation without affecting differentiation of other T cell lineages and was effective in delaying the onset and reducing the severity of autoimmune disease in mice. At high concentrations, digoxin is toxic for human cells, but non-toxic synthetic derivatives 20,22-dihydrodigoxin-21,23-diol and digoxin-21-salicylidene specifically inhibited induction of IL-17 in human CD4(+) T cells. Using these small-molecule compounds, we demonstrate that RORgammat is important for the maintenance of IL-17 expression in mouse and human effector T cells. These data indicate that derivatives of digoxin can be used as chemical templates for the development of RORgammat-targeted therapeutic agents that attenuate inflammatory lymphocyte function and autoimmune disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3172133/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3172133/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Huh, Jun R -- Leung, Monica W L -- Huang, Pengxiang -- Ryan, Daniel A -- Krout, Michael R -- Malapaka, Raghu R V -- Chow, Jonathan -- Manel, Nicolas -- Ciofani, Maria -- Kim, Sangwon V -- Cuesta, Adolfo -- Santori, Fabio R -- Lafaille, Juan J -- Xu, H Eric -- Gin, David Y -- Rastinejad, Fraydoon -- Littman, Dan R -- 2R01GM55217/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- F32GM0860552/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI080885/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01AI080885/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01GM058833/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM067659/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Apr 28;472(7344):486-90. doi: 10.1038/nature09978. Epub 2011 Mar 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Molecular Pathogenesis Program, The Kimmel Center for Biology and Medicine of the Skirball Institute, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21441909" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy/immunology/pathology ; Autoimmunity/drug effects/immunology ; Cell Differentiation/*drug effects ; Cell Line ; Digoxin/*analogs & derivatives/chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Drosophila/cytology ; Humans ; Interleukin-17/biosynthesis/immunology ; Mice ; Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group F, Member 3/*antagonists & ; inhibitors/metabolism ; Th17 Cells/*cytology/*drug effects/immunology ; Transcription, Genetic/drug effects/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2011-08-26
    Description: Genetic manipulations of insect populations for pest control have been advocated for some time, but there are few cases where manipulated individuals have been released in the field and no cases where they have successfully invaded target populations. Population transformation using the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia is particularly attractive because this maternally-inherited agent provides a powerful mechanism to invade natural populations through cytoplasmic incompatibility. When Wolbachia are introduced into mosquitoes, they interfere with pathogen transmission and influence key life history traits such as lifespan. Here we describe how the wMel Wolbachia infection, introduced into the dengue vector Aedes aegypti from Drosophila melanogaster, successfully invaded two natural A. aegypti populations in Australia, reaching near-fixation in a few months following releases of wMel-infected A. aegypti adults. Models with plausible parameter values indicate that Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes suffered relatively small fitness costs, leading to an unstable equilibrium frequency 〈30% that must be exceeded for invasion. These findings demonstrate that Wolbachia-based strategies can be deployed as a practical approach to dengue suppression with potential for area-wide implementation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hoffmann, A A -- Montgomery, B L -- Popovici, J -- Iturbe-Ormaetxe, I -- Johnson, P H -- Muzzi, F -- Greenfield, M -- Durkan, M -- Leong, Y S -- Dong, Y -- Cook, H -- Axford, J -- Callahan, A G -- Kenny, N -- Omodei, C -- McGraw, E A -- Ryan, P A -- Ritchie, S A -- Turelli, M -- O'Neill, S L -- England -- Nature. 2011 Aug 24;476(7361):454-7. doi: 10.1038/nature10356.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Bio21 Institute, Department of Genetics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21866160" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aedes/*microbiology/physiology/*virology ; Animals ; Dengue/microbiology/*prevention & control/*transmission/virology ; Dengue Virus/isolation & purification/*physiology ; Drosophila melanogaster/microbiology ; Female ; Humans ; Insect Vectors/microbiology/physiology/virology ; Male ; Pest Control, Biological/*methods ; Queensland ; Time Factors ; Wolbachia/isolation & purification/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-01-24
    Description: Sexually dimorphic mammalian tissues, including sexual organs and the brain, contain stem cells that are directly or indirectly regulated by sex hormones. An important question is whether stem cells also exhibit sex differences in physiological function and hormonal regulation in tissues that do not show sex-specific morphological differences. The terminal differentiation and function of some haematopoietic cells are regulated by sex hormones, but haematopoietic stem-cell function is thought to be similar in both sexes. Here we show that mouse haematopoietic stem cells exhibit sex differences in cell-cycle regulation by oestrogen. Haematopoietic stem cells in female mice divide significantly more frequently than in male mice. This difference depends on the ovaries but not the testes. Administration of oestradiol, a hormone produced mainly in the ovaries, increased haematopoietic stem-cell division in males and females. Oestrogen levels increased during pregnancy, increasing haematopoietic stem-cell division, haematopoietic stem-cell frequency, cellularity, and erythropoiesis in the spleen. Haematopoietic stem cells expressed high levels of oestrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha). Conditional deletion of ERalpha from haematopoietic stem cells reduced haematopoietic stem-cell division in female, but not male, mice and attenuated the increases in haematopoietic stem-cell division, haematopoietic stem-cell frequency, and erythropoiesis during pregnancy. Oestrogen/ERalpha signalling promotes haematopoietic stem-cell self-renewal, expanding splenic haematopoietic stem cells and erythropoiesis during pregnancy.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4015622/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4015622/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Nakada, Daisuke -- Oguro, Hideyuki -- Levi, Boaz P -- Ryan, Nicole -- Kitano, Ayumi -- Saitoh, Yusuke -- Takeichi, Makiko -- Wendt, George R -- Morrison, Sean J -- HL097760/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- NCI P30CA125123/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- NIAID AI036211/PHS HHS/ -- R01 HL097760/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- S10RR024574/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM008014/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jan 23;505(7484):555-8. doi: 10.1038/nature12932.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Pediatrics, and Children's Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; 1] Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2]. ; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24451543" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Count ; Cell Division/drug effects ; Erythropoiesis ; Estrogen Receptor alpha/metabolism ; Estrogens/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Female ; Hematopoietic Stem Cells/*cytology/drug effects/*metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Ovary/drug effects/metabolism ; Pregnancy ; Sex Characteristics ; Signal Transduction/drug effects ; Spleen/cytology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2012-07-06
    Description: Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) shed into blood from primary cancers include putative precursors that initiate distal metastases. Although these cells are extraordinarily rare, they may identify cellular pathways contributing to the blood-borne dissemination of cancer. Here, we adapted a microfluidic device for efficient capture of CTCs from an endogenous mouse pancreatic cancer model and subjected CTCs to single-molecule RNA sequencing, identifying Wnt2 as a candidate gene enriched in CTCs. Expression of WNT2 in pancreatic cancer cells suppresses anoikis, enhances anchorage-independent sphere formation, and increases metastatic propensity in vivo. This effect is correlated with fibronectin upregulation and suppressed by inhibition of MAP3K7 (also known as TAK1) kinase. In humans, formation of non-adherent tumour spheres by pancreatic cancer cells is associated with upregulation of multiple WNT genes, and pancreatic CTCs revealed enrichment for WNT signalling in 5 out of 11 cases. Thus, molecular analysis of CTCs may identify candidate therapeutic targets to prevent the distal spread of cancer.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408856/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408856/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yu, Min -- Ting, David T -- Stott, Shannon L -- Wittner, Ben S -- Ozsolak, Fatih -- Paul, Suchismita -- Ciciliano, Jordan C -- Smas, Malgorzata E -- Winokur, Daniel -- Gilman, Anna J -- Ulman, Matthew J -- Xega, Kristina -- Contino, Gianmarco -- Alagesan, Brinda -- Brannigan, Brian W -- Milos, Patrice M -- Ryan, David P -- Sequist, Lecia V -- Bardeesy, Nabeel -- Ramaswamy, Sridhar -- Toner, Mehmet -- Maheswaran, Shyamala -- Haber, Daniel A -- 5K12CA87723-09/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5R01EB008047/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- CA129933/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA117969/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129933/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01 EB012493/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jul 26;487(7408):510-3. doi: 10.1038/nature11217.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22763454" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Survival ; Contact Inhibition ; Disease Models, Animal ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/*genetics ; Genes, Neoplasm/genetics ; Humans ; MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors ; Mice ; Neoplasm Metastasis/*genetics ; Neoplastic Cells, Circulating/*metabolism ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*genetics/*pathology ; RNA, Messenger/analysis/biosynthesis ; Sequence Analysis, RNA ; Wnt Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Wnt Signaling Pathway/*genetics ; Wnt2 Protein/genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-06-09
    Description: Synaptic neurotransmitter release is driven by Ca(2+) influx through active zone voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Control of active zone VGCC abundance and function remains poorly understood. Here we show that a trafficking step probably sets synaptic VGCC levels in rats, because overexpression of the pore-forming alpha1(A) VGCC subunit fails to change synaptic VGCC abundance or function. alpha2deltas are a family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored VGCC-associated subunits that, in addition to being the target of the potent neuropathic analgesics gabapentin and pregabalin (alpha2delta-1 and alpha2delta-2), were also identified in a forward genetic screen for pain genes (alpha2delta-3). We show that these proteins confer powerful modulation of presynaptic function through two distinct molecular mechanisms. First, alpha2delta subunits set synaptic VGCC abundance, as predicted from their chaperone-like function when expressed in non-neuronal cells. Second, alpha2deltas configure synaptic VGCCs to drive exocytosis through an extracellular metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), a conserved set of amino acids within the predicted von Willebrand A domain of alpha2delta. Expression of alpha2delta with an intact MIDAS motif leads to an 80% increase in release probability, while simultaneously protecting exocytosis from blockade by an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator. alpha2deltas harbouring MIDAS site mutations still drive synaptic accumulation of VGCCs; however, they no longer change release probability or sensitivity to intracellular Ca(2+) chelators. Our data reveal dual functionality of these clinically important VGCC subunits, allowing synapses to make more efficient use of Ca(2+) entry to drive neurotransmitter release.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3376018/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3376018/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hoppa, Michael B -- Lana, Beatrice -- Margas, Wojciech -- Dolphin, Annette C -- Ryan, Timothy A -- G0700368/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- G0801756/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- G0901758/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- R01 MH085783/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH085783-01A1/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH085783-02/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH085783-03/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH085783-04/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 May 13;486(7401):122-5. doi: 10.1038/nature11033.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biochemistry, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10023, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22678293" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Action Potentials ; Animals ; Calcium Channels/biosynthesis/*genetics/*metabolism ; Calcium Signaling ; *Exocytosis ; Mice ; Neurotransmitter Agents/metabolism/*secretion ; Presynaptic Terminals/*metabolism/*secretion ; Probability ; Rats
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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