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  • WOMEN  (25)
  • B-CELL  (20)
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; FOLLOW-UP ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; RISK ; MECHANISM ; mechanisms ; ASSOCIATION ; FREQUENCY ; ACID ; ACIDS ; WOMEN ; fatty acids ; FATTY-ACIDS ; DIETARY ; PREVALENCE ; OXIDATIVE STRESS ; ANTIOXIDANT ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; questionnaires ; SMOKERS ; antioxidants ; FOOD ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; WEST-GERMANY ; asthma ; antioxidants,diet,EPIC,fatty acids,hay fever ; ATOPY ; BETA-CAROTENE ; EAST-GERMANY ; EPIC-GERMANY ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; NUTRIENTS ; VITAMIN-E
    Abstract: Background: The objective of the investigation was to explore in a prospective study the associations between dietary intake of fatty acids, antioxidants and hay fever manifestation in adulthood.Methods: Three hundred and thirty-four hay fever cases with adult onset of clinical symptoms from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Heidelberg cohort were identified during follow-up and matched with 1336 controls. Dietary intake data were obtained by means of validated food frequency questionnaires. The influence of dietary fatty acid and vitamin intake on hay fever risk was estimated by means of unconditional logistic regression.Results: High intake of oleic acid was positively associated with hay fever [odds ratio (OR): 2.86, 95% confidence intervals (95% CI): 1.22-6.70], whereas high intake of eicosapentaenoic acid was inversely related to hay fever (OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22-0.93). Furthermore, high beta-carotene intake increased the risk of hay fever (OR: 1.69, 95% CI: 1.09-2.63) while increasing intake of vitamin E was a protective factor (OR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.17-0.85). In grouped analyses, the effects of beta-carotene and vitamin E were mainly observed among women and ex-/current-smokers; in these subgroups, linoleic acid increased the risk of hay fever.Conclusions: In conclusion, the present results provide further evidence that dietary factors might affect the risk of clinical manifestation of hay fever. However, the effects in smokers and women may suggest different biological mechanisms for the investigated nutrients, which need further research
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14616103
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; COHORT ; DISEASES ; TIME ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; smoking ; PREVALENCE ; cigarette smoking ; EPIC ; TRENDS ; education ; BIRTH COHORT ; birth cohorts
    Abstract: Background. Several studies in Germany and other European countries have already shown smoking prevalence to be related to education. This study was aimed to investigate time trends in smoking habits in the German cohorts Heidelberg and Potsdam of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) according to sex, birth cohort, and level of education. Methods. Within EPIC, 25,546 and 27,548 participants were recruited in Heidelberg and Potsdam, respectively. Data on smoking were collected by means of a computer-guided interview during the baseline examination between 1994 and 1998. For each birth cohort smoking prevalence and mean number of cigarettes smoked per day at different ages were calculated. Odds ratios and 95% confidence interval for associations between smoking prevalence and educational level were computed by using logistic regression. Results. Smoking prevalence was higher among men than among women, with a smaller difference in younger birth cohorts. Between 1950 and 1960, smoking prevalence among women in the Heidelberg cohort rose sharply (from 12.8% to 51.8% in the least educated group). This strong increase was delayed by 10 years in the Potsdam cohort. Men and women in Heidelberg smoked more cigarettes per day than their counterparts in Potsdam, but in both study centers less educated subjects smoked more than subjects with a higher education. Conclusions. Smoking patterns in the Potsdam and Heidelberg cohorts are quite similar with respect to prevalence and years of lifetime smoking. Since an increasing difference between smoking prevalence of less and high educated individuals is observable, programs on smoking cessation should especially concentrate on persons of lower educational level. (C) 2003 American Health Foundation and Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12649053
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; neoplasms ; RISK ; TIME ; ASSOCIATION ; LYMPHOMA ; MALIGNANCIES ; WOMEN ; MEN ; leukemia ; cancer risk ; CARCINOGENS ; hair dyes ; case-control studies ; NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; MALIGNANCY ; PRODUCTS ; HUMAN CANCER ; INCREASE ; INTERVAL ; odds ratio ; population-based ; CANCER-RISK ; lymphatic system
    Abstract: Hair dyes have been evaluated as possibly being mutagenic and carcinogenic in animals. Studies of the association between human cancer risk and use of hair dyes have yielded inconsistent results. The authors evaluated the risk of lymphoid malignancies associated with personal use of hair dyes. The analysis included 2,302 incident cases of lymphoid neoplasms and 2,417 hospital- or population-based controls from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, and Spain (1998-2003). Use of hair dyes was reported by 74% of women and 7% of men. Lymphoma risk among dye users was significantly increased by 19% in comparison with never use (odds ratio (OR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00, 1.41) and by 26% among persons who used hair dyes 12 or more times per year (OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.60; p for linear trend = 0.414). Lymphoma risk was significantly higher among persons who had started coloring their hair before 1980 (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.72) and persons who had used hair dyes only before 1980 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.40). Personal use of hair dyes is associated with a moderate increase in lymphoma risk, particularly among women and persons who used dyes before 1980. Specific compounds associated with this risk remain to be elucidated
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16731576
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; evaluation ; Germany ; LUNG-CANCER ; screening ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; TIME ; CONTRAST ; ASSOCIATION ; ACID ; NO ; cancer prevention ; lifestyle ; DIFFERENCE ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; COUNTRIES ; PRODUCT ; RECRUITMENT ; DIET ; DIETARY ; FAT ; UNITED-STATES ; PREVALENCE ; CONSUMPTION ; meat ; nutrition ; BETA-CAROTENE ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; LEISURE-TIME ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; PRODUCTS ; SUPPLEMENT ; HIGH PREVALENCE ; SUPPLEMENTATION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; EPIC PROJECT ; RELATIVE VALIDITY ; LEVEL ; methods ; VITAMIN-C ; VITAMINS ; NO ASSOCIATION ; EPIC-Heidelberg ; PEOPLE ; - ; German ; milk ; FRENCH-WOMEN ; MINERAL SUPPLEMENTS ; nutrient supplements
    Abstract: Background The use of dietary supplements is often associated with a healthy lifestyle. Due to high variation in supplementation practice by country, these associations will be investigated in a large German cohort study. Aim of the study To describe the prevalence of dietary supplement use in the EPIC-Heidelberg cohort and to illuminate differences in health-relevant characteristics between regular users and non-users. Methods At cohort recruitment, 13,615 women aged 35-65 and 11,929 men aged 40-65 were asked for regular dietary supplementation over the past year. Results Regular use of any supplement was reported by 47% of the women and 41% of the men, vitamin or mineral supplements were taken by 40% and 33%, respectively. The use of vitamin and/or mineral supplements was significantly associated with higher age, being non- or ex-smoker, lower BMI, higher physical leisure time activity, and higher educational level. After adjustment for these factors, we observed positive associations between supplement use and the consumption of milk, milk products, and fish as well as the intake of vitamin C and beta-carotene. In contrast, the supplement use was related to lower meat and meat product consumption, saturated fat intake, and n6/n3-fatty acid ratio in the diet, both in women and men. Except for Hemoccult((R)) testing in women, no association with participation in cancer screening was observed. Conclusion The high prevalence of supplement use in EPIC-Heidelberg was associated with several presumably healthier lifestyle and diet characteristics. This needs to be considered in further evaluations of the risk of chronic diseases
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17377829
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; CELL ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SYSTEM ; cohort study ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; LYMPHOMA ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; etiology ; risk factors ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; B-CELL LYMPHOMA ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; ONCOLOGY ; DIETARY FACTORS ; ASSOCIATIONS ; IMMUNE-SYSTEM ; non-Hodgkin lymphoma ; INTERVAL ; FRUITS ; methods ; function ; prospective ; prospective study ; RISK-FACTOR ; HODGKIN LYMPHOMA ; B-CELL ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; DRINKING-WATER NITRATE
    Abstract: Introduction Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant diseases of cells of the immune system. The best-established risk factors are related to dys-regulation of immune function, and evidence suggests that factors such as dietary or lifestyle habits may be involved in the etiology. Material and methods In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 849 lymphoma cases were identified in a median follow-up period of 6.4 years. Fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated from validated dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association between fruit and vegetable intake with the risk of lymphomas overall and subentities. Results There was no overall association between total fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphoma [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-1.15 comparing highest with lowest quartile]. However, the risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) tended to be lower in participants with a high intake of total vegetables (HR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.23-1.02). Conclusion In this large prospective study, an inverse associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphomas overall could not be confirmed. Associations with lymphoma subentities such as DLBCL warrant further investigation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17443415
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; AGENTS ; CELL ; MODEL ; MODELS ; neoplasms ; FOLLOW-UP ; SYSTEM ; COHORT ; cohort study ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; HISTORY ; incidence ; RISK ; INFECTION ; MECHANISM ; primary ; RISK-FACTORS ; mechanisms ; T cell ; T-CELL ; ASSOCIATION ; DISORDER ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; NO ; LYMPHOMA ; CARE ; DESIGN ; PLASMA ; AGE ; WOMEN ; etiology ; MEN ; risk factors ; leukemia ; Jun ; diabetes ; ABNORMALITIES ; INFECTIONS ; EPIC ; nutrition ; immunosuppression ; non-hodgkin's lymphoma ; CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC-LEUKEMIA ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; VIRAL-INFECTION ; insulin ; MELLITUS ; AGENT ; AUTOIMMUNITY ; multiple myeloma ; DISORDERS ; MEDICAL HISTORY ; INCREASE ; T-CELL LYMPHOMA ; prospective studies ; methods ; SUBTYPES ; metabolic syndrome ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; prospective study ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCERS ; B-CELL ; ENGLAND ; ENVIRONMENTAL-FACTORS ; host ; INCREASES ; viral ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; non-Hodgkin ; neoplasm ; INTERLEUKIN-6 GENE
    Abstract: Background Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms arising from the lymphopoietic system including a wide range of subtypes of either B-cell or T-cell lymphomas. The few established risk factors for the development of these neoplasms include viral infections and immunological abnormalities, but their etiology remains largely unknown. Evidence suggests that certain medical conditions may be linked, through immunosuppression, to the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Multiple myeloma is a neoplasm of plasma cells that accounts for approximately 15% of lymphopoietic cancers. Increases in the incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in the past implicate environmental factors as potential causal agents. Design and Methods In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 1,213 histologically confirmed incident cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma (594 men; 619 women) were identified during a follow-up of 8.5 years. Cox proportional hazard models were used to explore the association between self-reported diabetes, diagnosed after 30 years of age, and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall and multiple myeloma and various lymphoma subtypes. Results We found no association between a personal history of diabetes and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall in men (HR: 1.28, 95% CI: 0.89-1.84), in women (HR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.41-1.24), or in men and women combined (HR: 1.09, 95% CI: 0.80-1.47). Among the B-non-Hodgkin's lymphoma subtypes, we observed a statistically significant increased risk of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (HR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.04-3.86) in men, but not in women (HR: 1.07, 95% CI: 0.33-3.43). Conclusions This prospective study did not provide evidence for a role of self-reported diabetes in the etiology of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall or multiple myeloma. We found an increased risk of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia among men with diabetes, but not among women. We hypothesize that diabetes may not play a causal role in the etiology of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, though the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of both disorders may include shared genetic, host and/or environmental susceptibility factors
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18443270
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; CLASSIFICATION ; DIAGNOSIS ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; WOMEN ; case-control studies ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; EUROPE ; SKIN-CANCER ; SUNLIGHT ; CELL CARCINOMA ; pooled analysis ; B-CELL ; VITAMIN-D ; non Hodgkin lymphoma ; personal sun exposure ; ULTRAVIOLET-RADIATION EXPOSURE
    Abstract: In 2004-2007 4 independent case-control studies reported evidence that sun exposure might protect against NHL; a fifth, in women only, found increased risks of NHL associated with a range of sun exposure measurements. These 5 studies are the first to examine the association between personal sun exposure and NHL. We report here on the relationship between sun exposure and NHL in a pooled analysis of 10 studies participating in the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph), including the 5 published studies. Ten case-control studies covering 8,243 cases and 9,697 controls in the USA, Europe and Australia contributed original data for participants of European origin to the pooled analysis. Four kinds of measures of self-reported personal sun exposure were assessed at interview. A two-stage estimation method was used in which study-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for potential confounders including smoking and alcohol use, were obtained from unconditional logistic regression models and combined in random-effects models to obtain the pooled estimates. Risk of NHL fell significantly with the composite measure of increasing recreational sun exposure, pooled OR = 0.76 (95% CI 0.63-0.91) for the highest exposure category (p for trend 0.01). A downtrend in risk with increasing total sun exposure was not statistically significant. The protective effect of recreational sun exposure was statistically significant at 18-40 years of age and in the 10 years before diagnosis, and for B cell, but not T cell, lymphomas. Increased recreational sun exposure may protect against NHL. (C) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17708556
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER MORTALITY ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; T-CELL ; ASSOCIATION ; LYMPHOMA ; HEALTH ; COUNTRIES ; leukemia ; FOLLICULAR LYMPHOMA ; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE ; NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; case-control study ; METAANALYSIS ; HYDROCARBONS ; methods ; SUBTYPES ; B-CELL ; chronic lymphocytic leukaemia ; ORGANIC-SOLVENTS ; BENZENE EXPOSURE ; MULTINATIONAL COHORT ; PETROLEUM WORKERS ; TRICHLOROETHYLENE
    Abstract: Background Several studies have suggested an association between occupational exposure to solvents and lymphoma risk. However, findings are inconsistent and the role of specific chemicals is not known. Objective To investigate the role of occupational exposure to organic solvents in the aetiology of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) and its major subtypes, as well as Hodgkin's lymphoma and T-cell lymphoma. Methods 2348 lymphoma cases and 2462 controls participated in a case-control study in six European countries. A subset of cases were reviewed by a panel of pathologists to ensure diagnostic consistency. Exposure to solvents was assessed by industrial hygienists and occupational experts based on a detailed occupational questionnaire. Results Risk of follicular lymphoma significantly increased with three independent metrics of exposure to benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) (combined p = 4 x 10(-7)) and to styrene (p = 1 x 10(-5)), and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) risk increased with exposure to solvents overall (p = 4 x 10(-6)), BTX (p = 5 x 10(-5)), gasoline (p = 8 x 10(-5)) and other solvents (p = 2 x 10(-6)). Risk of B-NHL for ever exposure to solvents was not elevated (OR = 1.1, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.3), and that for CLL and follicular lymphoma was 1.3 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.6) and 1.3 (95% CI 1.0 to 1.7), respectively. Exposure to benzene accounted, at least partially, for the association observed with CLL risk. Hodgkin's lymphoma and T-cell lymphoma did not show an association with solvent exposure. Conclusion This analysis of a large European dataset confirms a role of occupational exposure to solvents in the aetiology of B-NHL, and particularly, CLL. It is suggested that benzene is most likely to be implicated, but we cannot exclude the possibility of a role for other solvents in relation to other lymphoma subtypes, such as follicular lymphoma. No association with risk of T-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma was shown
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20447988
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SUPPORT ; incidence ; RISK ; RISKS ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; LYMPHOMA ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; INDIVIDUALS ; PREVALENCE ; body mass index ; EPIC ; nutrition ; B-CELL LYMPHOMA ; FOLLICULAR LYMPHOMA ; RELATIVE RISK ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; BODIES ; multiple myeloma ; WEIGHT ; prospective studies ; HEIGHT ; methods ; diffuse large B-cell lymphoma ; SUBTYPES ; MASS ; prospective ; prospective study ; NOR ; B-CELL ; body mass ; RATIO ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; non-Hodgkin ; CONFIDENCE-INTERVALS
    Abstract: The incidences of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma are increasing steadily. It has been hypothesized that this may be due, in part, to the parallel rising prevalence of obesity. It is biologically plausible that anthropometric characteristics can infuence the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. DESIGN AND METHODS: In the context of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), anthropometric characteristics were assessed in 371,983 cancer-free individuals at baseline. During the 8.5 years of follow-up, 1,219 histologically confirmed incident cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma occurred in 609 men and 610 women. Gender-specific proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of development of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in relation to the anthropometric characteristics. RESULTS: Height was associated with overall non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in women (RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.14-1.98) for highest versus lowest quartile; p-trend 〈 0.01) but not in men. Neither obesity (weight and body mass index) nor abdominal fat (waist-to-hip ratio, waist or hip circumference) measures were positively associated with overall non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Relative risks for highest versus lowest body mass index quartile were 1.09 (95% CI 0.85-1.38) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.71-1.19) for men and women, respectively. Women in the upper body mass index quartile were at greater risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (RR 2.18, 95% CI 1.05-4.53) and taller women had an elevated risk of follicular lymphoma (RR 1.25, 95% CI 0.59-2.62). Among men, height and body mass index were non-significantly, positively related to follicular lymphoma. Multiple myeloma risk alone was elevated for taller women (RR 2.34, 95% CI 1.29-4.21) and heavier men (RR 1.77, 95% CI 1.02-3.05). CONCLUSIONS: The EPIC analyses support an association between height and overall non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma among women and suggest heterogeneous subtype associations. This is one of the first prospective studies focusing on central adiposity and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma subtypes
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18835833
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  • 10
    Keywords: human ; neoplasms ; CLASSIFICATION ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; NEW-YORK ; RISK ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; INFECTION ; ASSOCIATION ; antibodies ; antibody ; virus ; LYMPHOMA ; ASSAY ; AGE ; LYMPHOCYTES ; case-control studies ; PREVALENCE ; EUROPE ; B-CELL LYMPHOMA ; HUMAN-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS ; SERUM ; ADULT ; case-control study ; MALIGNANT-LYMPHOMA ; MIXED CRYOGLOBULINEMIA ; RECIPIENTS ; non-Hodgkin lymphoma ; analysis ; methods ; SUBTYPES ; ASSAYS ; USA ; B-CELL ; MALIGNANT-LYMPHOMAS ; LOW-GRADE ; non Hodgkin lymphoma ; VIRUS CORE PROTEIN ; CONSORTIUM ; red ; INTERLYMPH
    Abstract: Background & Aims: increasing evidence points towards a role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in causing malignant lymphomas. We pooled case-control study data to provide robust estimates of the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) subtypes after HCV infection. Methods: The analysis included 7 member studies from the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph) based in Europe, North America, and Australia. Adult cases of NHL (n = 4784) were diagnosed between 1988 and 2004 and controls (n = 6269) were matched by age, sex, and study center. All studies used third-generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to test for antibodies against HCV in serum samples. Participants who were human immunodeficiency virus positive or were organ-transplant recipients were excluded. Results: HCV infection was detected in 172 NHL cases (3.60%) and in 169 (2.70%) controls (odds ratio [OR], 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40 -2.25). In subtype-specific analyses, HCV prevalence was associated with marginal zone lymphoma (OR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.44-4.23), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (OR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.682.99), and lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (OR, 2.57; 95% CI, 1.14-5.79). Notably, risk estimates were not increased for follicular lymphoma (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.65-1.60). Conclusions: These results confirm the association between HCV infection and NHL and specific B-NHL subtypes (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, and lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18387498
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