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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; METABOLISM ; IMPACT ; ASSOCIATION ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; insulin ; MELLITUS ; ONCOLOGY ; ASSOCIATIONS ; UPPER AERODIGESTIVE TRACT ; MOLECULAR-MECHANISMS ; BLOOD-GLUCOSE ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; INCREASED RISK ; HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION ; ORAL-CAVITY ; INHANCE CONSORTIUM
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: A history of diabetes is associated with an increased risk of several types of cancers. Whether diabetes is a risk factor for head and neck cancer (HNC) has received little attention. METHODS: We pooled data from 12 case-control studies including 6,448 cases and 13,747 controls, and estimated OR and 95% CI for the associations between diabetes and HNC, adjusted for age, education level, sex, race/ethnicity, study center, cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and body mass index. RESULTS: We observed a weak association between diabetes and the incidence of HNC overall (OR, 1.09; 95% CI: 0.95-1.24). However, we observed a modest association among never smokers (OR, 1.59; 95% CI: 1.22-2.07), and no association among ever smokers (OR, 0.96; 95% CI: 0.83-1.11); likelihood ratio test for interaction P = 0.001. CONCLUSION: A history of diabetes was weakly associated with HNC overall, but we observed evidence of effect modification by smoking status, with a positive association among those who never smoked cigarettes.Impact: This study suggests that glucose metabolism abnormalities may be a HNC risk factor in subgroups of the population. Prospective studies incorporating biomarkers are needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between diabetes and HNC risk, possibly providing new strategies in the prevention of HNC.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22144496
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; SUPPORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; LONG-TERM ; RISK ; COMPONENTS ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; LYMPHOMA ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; UNITED-STATES ; case-control studies ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; B-CELL LYMPHOMA ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; MALIGNANT-LYMPHOMA ; WEIGHT ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; non-Hodgkin lymphoma ; analysis ; diffuse large B-cell lymphoma ; SUBTYPES ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; pooled analysis ; OVERWEIGHT ; USA ; BMI ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; B-CELL ; ENGLAND ; RATIO ; non Hodgkin lymphoma ; EXCESS ; POOLED-ANALYSIS ; NO EVIDENCE ; non-Hodgkin ; CONSORTIUM ; nutritional status ; INTERLYMPH ; body mass index weight ; FORMER COLLEGE-STUDENTS ; LYMPHOHEMATOPOIETIC MALIGNANCIES ; SCANDINAVIAN MEN
    Abstract: Nutritional status is known to alter immune function, a suspected risk factor for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). To investigate whether long-term over, or under, nutrition is associated with NHL, self-reported anthropometric data on weight and height from over 10,000 cases of NHL and 16,000 controls were pooled across 18 case-control studies identified through the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium. Study-specific odds ratios (OR) were estimated using logistic regression and combined using a random-effects model. Severe obesity, defined as BMI of 40 kg m(-2) or more, was not associated with NHL overall (pooled OR = 1.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70-1.41) or the majority of NHL subtypes. An excess was however observed for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (pooled OR = 1.80, 95% CI 1.24-2.62), although not all study-specific ORs were raised. Among the overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg m(-2)) and obese (BMI 30-39.9 kg m(-2)), associations were elevated in some studies and decreased in others, while no association was observed among the underweight (BMI 〈 18.5 kg m(-2)). There was little suggestion of increasing ORs for NHL or its subtypes with every 5 kg m(-2) rise in BMI above 18.5 kg m(-2). BMI components height and weight were also examined, and the tallest men, but not women, were at marginally increased risk (pooled OR = 1.19, 95% CI 1.06-1.34). In summary, whilst we conclude that there is no evidence to support the hypothesis that obesity is a determinant of all types of NHL combined, the association between severe obesity and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma may warrant further investigation. (C) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18167059
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  • 3
    Keywords: COHORT ; RISK-FACTORS ; WOMEN ; METAANALYSIS ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; SECULAR TRENDS ; EPIDEMIOLOGY CONSORTIUM ; INTERNATIONAL HEAD ; CARDIORESPIRATORY DISEASE ; LEG LENGTH
    Abstract: Several epidemiological studies have shown a positive association between adult height and cancer incidence. The only study conducted among women on mouth and pharynx cancer risk, however, reported an inverse association. This study aims to investigate the association between height and the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) within a large international consortium of HNC. We analyzed pooled individual-level data from 24 case-control studies participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated separately for men and women for associations between height and HNC risk. Educational level, tobacco smoking, and alcohol consumption were included in all regression models. Stratified analyses by HNC subsites were performed. This project included 17,666 cases and 28,198 controls. We found an inverse association between height and HNC (adjusted OR per 10 cm height = 0.91, 95 % CI 0.86-0.95 for men; adjusted OR = 0.86, 95 % CI 0.79-0.93 for women). In men, the estimated OR did vary by educational level, smoking status, geographic area, and control source. No differences by subsites were detected. Adult height is inversely associated with HNC risk. As height can be considered a marker of childhood illness and low energy intake, the inverse association is consistent with prior studies showing that HNC occur more frequently among deprived individuals. Further studies designed to elucidate the mechanism of such association would be warranted.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24271556
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