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  • Bacterial Proteins/*chemistry/*metabolism  (1)
  • Cell Membrane/chemistry/metabolism  (1)
  • Geobacillus stearothermophilus/*chemistry  (1)
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: Bacteria share their ecological niches with other microbes. The bacterial type VI secretion system is one of the key players in microbial competition, as well as being an important virulence determinant during bacterial infections. It assembles a nano-crossbow-like structure in the cytoplasm of the attacker cell that propels an arrow made of a haemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp) tube and a valine-glycine repeat protein G (VgrG) spike and punctures the prey's cell wall. The nano-crossbow is stably anchored to the cell envelope of the attacker by a membrane core complex. Here we show that this complex is assembled by the sequential addition of three type VI subunits (Tss)-TssJ, TssM and TssL-and present a structure of the fully assembled complex at 11.6 A resolution, determined by negative-stain electron microscopy. With overall C5 symmetry, this 1.7-megadalton complex comprises a large base in the cytoplasm. It extends in the periplasm via ten arches to form a double-ring structure containing the carboxy-terminal domain of TssM (TssMct) and TssJ that is anchored in the outer membrane. The crystal structure of the TssMct-TssJ complex coupled to whole-cell accessibility studies suggest that large conformational changes induce transient pore formation in the outer membrane, allowing passage of the attacking Hcp tube/VgrG spike.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Durand, Eric -- Nguyen, Van Son -- Zoued, Abdelrahim -- Logger, Laureen -- Pehau-Arnaudet, Gerard -- Aschtgen, Marie-Stephanie -- Spinelli, Silvia -- Desmyter, Aline -- Bardiaux, Benjamin -- Dujeancourt, Annick -- Roussel, Alain -- Cambillau, Christian -- Cascales, Eric -- Fronzes, Remi -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 30;523(7562):555-60. doi: 10.1038/nature14667. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Systemes Macromoleculaires, Aix-Marseille Universite - CNRS, UMR 7255, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille Cedex 20, France [2] Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, CNRS, UMR 7257, Campus de Luminy, Case 932, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09, France [3] G5 Biologie structurale de la secretion bacterienne, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Docteur Roux, 75015 Paris, France [4] UMR 3528, CNRS, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Docteur Roux, 75015 Paris, France [5] AFMB, Aix-Marseille Universite, IHU Mediterranee Infection, Campus de Luminy, Case 932, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09, France. ; 1] Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, CNRS, UMR 7257, Campus de Luminy, Case 932, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09, France [2] AFMB, Aix-Marseille Universite, IHU Mediterranee Infection, Campus de Luminy, Case 932, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09, France. ; Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Systemes Macromoleculaires, Aix-Marseille Universite - CNRS, UMR 7255, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402 Marseille Cedex 20, France. ; UMR 3528, CNRS, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Docteur Roux, 75015 Paris, France. ; 1] UMR 3528, CNRS, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Docteur Roux, 75015 Paris, France [2] Unite de Bioinformatique Structurale, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Docteur Roux, 75015 Paris, France. ; 1] G5 Biologie structurale de la secretion bacterienne, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Docteur Roux, 75015 Paris, France [2] UMR 3528, CNRS, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Docteur Roux, 75015 Paris, France.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200339" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Bacterial Secretion Systems ; Cell Membrane/chemistry/metabolism ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Cytoplasm/chemistry/metabolism ; Escherichia coli/*chemistry/metabolism ; Escherichia coli Proteins/biosynthesis/*chemistry ; Lipopeptides/biosynthesis/*chemistry ; Membrane Proteins/biosynthesis/*chemistry ; Microscopy, Electron ; Models, Molecular ; Multiprotein Complexes/*biosynthesis/*chemistry ; Periplasm/chemistry/metabolism ; Porosity ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Protein Subunits/biosynthesis/chemistry
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-06-23
    Description: S-layers are regular two-dimensional semipermeable protein layers that constitute a major cell-wall component in archaea and many bacteria. The nanoscale repeat structure of the S-layer lattices and their self-assembly from S-layer proteins (SLPs) have sparked interest in their use as patterning and display scaffolds for a range of nano-biotechnological applications. Despite their biological abundance and the technological interest in them, structural information about SLPs is limited to truncated and assembly-negative proteins. Here we report the X-ray structure of the SbsB SLP of Geobacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 by the use of nanobody-aided crystallization. SbsB consists of a seven-domain protein, formed by an amino-terminal cell-wall attachment domain and six consecutive immunoglobulin-like domains, that organize into a phi-shaped disk-like monomeric crystallization unit stabilized by interdomain Ca(2+) ion coordination. A Ca(2+)-dependent switch to the condensed SbsB quaternary structure pre-positions intermolecular contact zones and renders the protein competent for S-layer assembly. On the basis of crystal packing, chemical crosslinking data and cryo-electron microscopy projections, we present a model for the molecular organization of this SLP into a porous protein sheet inside the S-layer. The SbsB lattice represents a previously undescribed structural model for protein assemblies and may advance our understanding of SLP physiology and self-assembly, as well as the rational design of engineered higher-order structures for biotechnology.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Baranova, Ekaterina -- Fronzes, Remi -- Garcia-Pino, Abel -- Van Gerven, Nani -- Papapostolou, David -- Pehau-Arnaudet, Gerard -- Pardon, Els -- Steyaert, Jan -- Howorka, Stefan -- Remaut, Han -- BB/E010466/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jul 5;487(7405):119-22. doi: 10.1038/nature11155.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Structural and Molecular Microbiology, VIB Department of Structural Biology, VIB, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22722836" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Bacterial Proteins/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Calcium/chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology ; Cryoelectron Microscopy ; Crystallization/methods ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Geobacillus stearothermophilus/*chemistry ; Immunoglobulins/chemistry ; Membrane Proteins/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Dynamics Simulation ; Nanostructures/chemistry ; Polymerization/drug effects ; Protein Structure, Quaternary/drug effects ; Protein Structure, Tertiary/drug effects ; Solutions
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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