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  • 1
    ISSN: 1432-0533
    Keywords: Histochemical ; Delineation ; Infarcted ; Brain
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary Tetrazolium salts, histochemical indicators of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, have been used by some pathologists to detect infarcts in myocardium. We explored the utility of this technique in detecting experimental brain infarcts and report our findings. Infarcts were produced in cats, gerbils, and rats by unilateral temporal and permanent cerebral vessel occlusion. After various time periods the animals were killed, and their brains were reacted with 2,3,5, triphenyl, 2H-tetrazolium chloride (TTC). The experimental and contralateral hemispheres were examined by light and electron microscopy. The TTC-stained tissue was correlated with histology. In some situations the histological condition of the tissue correlated well with the TTC staining results. Brain regions supplied by temporarily occluded vessels and judged infarcted by light and electron microscopy did not stain. In these regions less than 6% of the mitochondria were intact. In brain tissue from animals with permanent vessel occlusion (no reflow) mitochondria were intact despite the fact that other cellular organelles, such as nuclei, were destroyed. TTC stained such mitochondria and as a result could not distinguish infarcted brain in complete ischemia situations (no reflow). Another draw back to this staining procedure was 36 h after infarction macrophages with intact mitochondria would replace damage neurons and be stained. Under ideal conditions though this technique can detect irreversibly damaged brain as early as 2.5 h after artery occlusion.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1432-1920
    Keywords: Brain ; Infection ; Computed tomography ; Parasites ; Inflammation ; Sparganosis
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary Cerebral sparganosis is a rare parasitic CNS disease, producing chronic active granulomatous inflammation. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data, CT scans and histopathologic specimens in 34 patients with cerebral sparganosis. The majority of the patients (89%) were rural inhabitants; 75% had a history of ingestion of frogs and/or snakes. The major presenting symptoms were seizure (84%), hemiparesis (59%) and headache (56%) of chronic course. On CT scans, the disease most frequently involved the cerebral hemispheres, particularly frontoparietal lobes, with occasional extension to the external and internal capsules and basal ganglia. The cerebellum was rarely involved. Bilateral involvement was seen in 26%. The main CT findings consisted of white matter hypodensity with adjacent ventricular dilatation (88%), irregular or nodular enhancing lesion (88%), and small punctate calcifications (76%). In combination, the CT triad above appears to be specific for this disease, and was noted in 62% of cases. Of 16 follow-up CT scans, 5 (38%) showed a change in the location of the enhancing nodule. With a single CT scan, it does not appear to be possible to determine whether the worm is alive or dead, information important for deciding whether to intervene surgically. Change in the location of the enhancing nodule and/or worsening of the other CT findings on sequential CT scans would suggest that the worm is alive and that the patient is a candidate for surgery.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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