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  • CANCER  (1)
  • CIGARETTE WARNING LABELS  (1)
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; RISK ; IMPACT ; CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; MEN ; SMOKERS ; PRODUCTS ; SMOKING-CESSATION ; 4 COUNTRY SURVEY
    Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To examine if exclusive Roll-Your-Own (RYO) tobacco use relative to factory-made (FM) cigarette use has been rising over time, to determine the extent to which economic motives and perceptions that RYO cigarettes are less harmful act as primary motivations for use, and to examine the association of income and education with the level of RYO tobacco use among smokers in four European countries. METHODS: Data were obtained from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys, and a cohort sample of 7070 smokers from the Netherlands, Germany, France and UK were interviewed between June 2006 and December 2012. Generalised estimating equations (GEE) were used to assess trends in RYO use, and whether RYO consumption varied by socioeconomic variables. RESULTS: Exclusive RYO use over the study period has increased significantly in the UK from 26.4% in 2007 to 32.7% in 2010 (p〈0.001); France from 12.2% in 2006 to 19.1% in 2012 (p〈0.001); and Germany from 12.7% in 2007 to 18.6% in 2011 (p=0.031), with increased borderline significantly in the Netherlands (31.7% to 34.3%, p=0.052), from 2008 to 2010. Over three-quarters of users in each of the study countries indicated that lower price was a reason why they smoked RYO. Just over a fourth of smokers in the UK, less than a fifth in France, and around a tenth in Germany and the Netherlands believed that RYO is healthier. Compared with exclusive FM users, exclusive RYO users were more likely to have lower incomes and lower education. CONCLUSIONS: Effective tobacco tax regulation is needed in the European Union and elsewhere to eliminate or reduce the price advantage of RYO tobacco. Additional health messages are also required to correct the misperception that RYO tobacco is healthier than FM cigarettes.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26101043
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  • 2
    Keywords: COUNTRIES ; SMOKERS ; INEQUALITIES ; ADULTS ; CESSATION ; INTERVENTIONS ; PRICE ; CIGARETTE WARNING LABELS ; REDUCE SMOKING ; EQUITY IMPACT
    Abstract: Introduction: The aim of the current study is to investigate trends and socioeconomic differences in policy triggers for thinking about quitting in six European countries. Methods: Data were derived from all available survey waves of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Europe Surveys (2003-2013). France conducted three survey waves (n = 1420-1735), Germany three waves (n = 515-1515), The Netherlands seven waves (n = 1420-1668), Ireland three waves (n = 582-1071), Scotland two waves (n = 461-507), and the rest of the United Kingdom conducted seven survey waves (n = 861-1737). Smokers were asked whether four different policies (cigarette price, smoking restrictions in public places, free or lower cost medication, and warning labels on cigarette packs) influenced them to think about quitting. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) models were estimated for each country. Results: Cigarette price was mentioned most often in all countries and across all waves as trigger for thinking about quitting. Mentioning cigarette price and warning labels increased after the implementation of price increases and warning labels in some countries, while mentioning smoking restrictions decreased after their implementation in four countries. All studied policy triggers were mentioned more often by smokers with low and/or moderate education and income than smokers with high education and income. The education and income differences did not change significantly over time for most policies and in most countries. Conclusions: Tobacco control policies work as a trigger to increase thoughts about quitting, particularly in smokers with low education and low income and therefore have the potential to reduce health inequalities in smoking.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26282108
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