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  • CANCER-RISK  (25)
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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; NITRIC-OXIDE ; INFECTION ; ASSOCIATION ; antibodies ; antibody ; PLASMA ; NUMBER ; cancer risk ; DIETARY ; INDIVIDUALS ; CARDIA ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; INCREASE ; IRON ; LEVEL ; prospective ; MEAT INTAKE ; RED MEAT ; CANCER-RISK ; Helicobacter pylori ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; HEME ; processed meat
    Abstract: The risk of gastric cancer (GC) associated with dietary intake of nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and endogenous formation of nitroso compounds (NOCs) was investigated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The study included 521 457 individuals and 314 incident cases of GC that had occurred after 6.6 average years of follow-up. An index of endogenous NOC (ENOC) formation was estimated using data of the iron content from meat intake and faecal apparent total NOC formation according to previous published studies. Antibodies to Helicobacter pylori and vitamin C levels were measured in a sub-sample of cases and matched controls included in a nested case-control within the cohort. Exposure to NDMA was 〈 1 mu g on average compared with 93 mu g on average from ENOC. There was no association between NDMA intake and GC risk (HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.7-1.43). ENOC was significantly associated with non-cardia cancer risk (HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.14-1.78 for an increase of 40 mu g/day) but not with cardia cancer (HR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.69-1.33). Although the number of not infected cases is low, our data suggest a possible interaction between ENOC and H.pylori infection (P for interaction = 0.09). Moreover, we observed an interaction between plasma vitamin C and ENOC (P 〈 0.02). ENOC formation may account for our previously reported association between red and processed meat consumption and gastric cancer risk
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16571648
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; LUNG ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; cohort study ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; EXPOSURE ; MORTALITY ; occupation ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; REDUCTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; HUMANS ; WOMEN ; MEN ; risk factors ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; POPULATIONS ; DIET ; VALIDITY ; EPIC ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; RELATIVE RISK ; exercise ; physical activity ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; INTERVAL ; SUBTYPES ; prospective ; UNIT ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; sports ; occupations ; ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE
    Abstract: Research conducted predominantly in male populations on physical activity and lung cancer has yielded inconsistent results. We examined this relationship among 416,277 men and women from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Detailed information on recent recreational, household and occupational physical activity, smoking habits and diet was assessed at baseline between 1992 and 2000. Relative risks (RR) were estimated using Cox regression. During 6.3 years of follow-up we identified 607 men and 476 women with incident lung cancer. We did not observe an inverse association between recent occupational, recreational or household physical activity and lung cancer risk in either males or females. However, we found some reduction in lung cancer risk associated with sports in males (adjusted RR = 0.71; 95% confidence interval 0.50-0.98; highest tertile vs. inactive group), cycling (RR = 0.73; 0.54-0.99) in females and non-occupational vigorous physical activity. For occupational physical activity, lung cancer risk was increased for unemployed men (adjusted RR = 1.57; 1.20-2.05) and men with standing occupations (RR = 1.35; 1.02-1.79) compared with sitting professions. There was no evidence of heterogeneity of physical activity associations across countries, or across any of the considered cofactors. For some histologic subtypes suggestive sex-specific reductions, limited by subgroup sizes, were observed, especially with vigorous physical activity. In total, our study shows no consistent protective associations of physical activity with lung cancer risk. It can be assumed that the elevated risks found for occupational physical activity are not produced mechanistically by physical activity itself but rather reflect exposure to occupation-related lung cancer risk factors. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16894558
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; RISK ; METABOLISM ; INDEX ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; NO ; hormone ; PLASMA ; NUMBER ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; cancer risk ; ORAL-CONTRACEPTIVES ; cholesterol ; LIPOPROTEIN ; LOW-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN ; case-control studies ; ABNORMALITIES ; BODY ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; RELATIVE RISK ; REGRESSION-MODELS ; CLUSTER ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; MASS INDEX ; MASSES ; BODIES ; ONCOLOGY ; case control study ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; ENDOMETRIAL ; RE ; INCREASE ; BODY-SIZE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; metabolic syndrome ; HORMONES ; prospective ; UNIT ; CANCER-RISK ; C-PEPTIDE ; SET ; case control ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; BODY-MASS ; BODY-MASS-INDEX ; lipid ; HDL-CHOLESTEROL ; LOW-DENSITY ; SERUM-CHOLESTEROL
    Abstract: To clarify the role of metabolic factors in endometrial carcinogenesis, we conducted a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), and examined the relation between prediagnostic plasma lipids, lipoproteins, and glucose, the metabolic syndrome (MetS; a cluster of metabolic factors) and endometrial cancer risk. Among pre- and postmenopausal women, 284 women developed endometrial cancer during follow-up. Using risk set sampling, 546 matched control subjects were selected. From conditional logistic regression models, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were inversely associated with risk body mass index (BMI)-adjusted relative risk (FR) for top versus bottom quartile 0.61 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.38-0.97), P-trend= 0.02). Glucose levels were positively associated with risk (BMI-adjusted RR top versus bottom quartile 1.69 (95% Cl 0.99-2.90), P-trend, = 0.03), which appeared stronger among postmenopausal women (BMI-adjusted RR top versus bottom tertile 2.61 (95% Cl 1.46-4.66), P-trend=0.0006, P-heterogeneity=0.13) and never-users of exogenous hormones (P-heterogeneity=0-005 for oral contraceptive (OC) use and 0.05 for hormone replacement therapy-use). The associations of HDL-C and glucose with risk were no longer statistically significant after further adjustment for obesity-related hormones. Plasma total cholesterol, Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides were not significantly related to overall risk. The presence of MetS was associated with risk (RR 2.12 (95% CI 1.51-2.97)), which increased with the number of MetS factors (P-trend=0.02). An increasing number of MetS factors other than waist circumference, however, was marginally significantly associated with risk only in women with waist circumference above the median (P-interaction=0-01). None of the associations differed significantly by fasting status. These findings suggest that metabolic abnormalities and obesity may act synergistically to increase endometrial cancer risk
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17914105
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; Germany ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; INFECTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; REDUCED RISK ; risk factors ; cancer risk ; RECRUITMENT ; DIET ; STOMACH ; adenocarcinoma ; case-control studies ; TOBACCO ; ALCOHOL ; CARDIA ; EPIC ; ESOPHAGUS ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; STOMACH-CANCER ; case-control study ; ASSOCIATIONS ; DIGESTIVE-TRACT ; gastric cancer ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; methods ; PROFILES ; prospective ; EVALUATE ; odds ratio ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; Helicobacter pylori ; cardia cancer ; socioeconomic position
    Abstract: Objectives To evaluate the association of socioeconomic position with adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus and stomach. Methods The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort comprises about 520000 participants mostly aged 35-70 years. Information on diet and lifestyle was collected at recruitment. After an average follow-up of 6.5 years, 268 cases with adenocarcinoma of the stomach and 56 of the oesophagus were confirmed. We examined the effect of socioeconomic position on cancer risk by means of educational data and a computed Relative Index of Inequality (RII). In a nested case-control study, adjustment for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was performed. Results Higher education was significantly associated with a reduced risk of gastric cancer [vs lowest level of education, hazard ratio (HR): 0.64, 95% Confidence intervals (CI): 0.43-0.981. This effect was more pronounced for cancer of the cardia (HR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.20-0.89) as compared to non-cardia gastric cancer (HR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.36-1.22). Additionally, the inverse association of educational level and gastric cancer was stronger for cases with intestinal (extreme categories, HR: 0.13, 95% CI: 0.04-0.44) rather than diffuse histological subtype (extreme categories, HR: 0.71 95% CI: 0.37-1.40). In the nested case-control study, inverse but statistically non-significant associations were found after additional adjustment for H. pylori infection [highest vs lowest level of education: Odds ratio (OR) 0.53, 95% CI: 0.24-1.18]. Educational level was non-significantly, inversely associated with carcinoma of the oesophagus. Conclusion A higher socioeconomic position was associated with a reduced risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, which was strongest for cardia cancer or intestinal histological subtype, suggesting different risk profiles according to educational level. These effects appear to be explained only partially by established risk factors
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17227779
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; POPULATION ; RISK ; MARKER ; BIOMARKERS ; colon ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FRANCE ; COLON-CANCER ; MULTIVARIATE ; UNITED-STATES ; case-control studies ; GLUCOSE ; nutrition ; BETA-CELL FUNCTION ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; RE ; INCREASE ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; metabolic syndrome ; USA ; prospective ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; NOV ; HEMOGLOBIN ; TYPE-2 DIABETES-MELLITUS ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; CHRONIC OXIDATIVE STRESS ; GLUCOSE TOXICITY ; RECTAL CANCERS ; SERUM C-PEPTIDE
    Abstract: Although large-scale prospective cohort studies have related hyperglycemia to increased risk of cancer overall, studies specifically on colorectal cancer have been generally small. We investigated the association between prediagnostic levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a marker for average glucose level in blood, and colorectal cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. One thousand and twenty-six incident colorectal cancer cases (561 men and 465 women) and 1,026 matched controls were eligible for the study. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORS) adjusted for possible confounders. Increasing HbA1c percentages were statistically significantly associated with a mild increase in colorectal cancer risk in the whole population [OR, 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01,1.19 for a 10% increase in HbA1c]. In women, increasing HbA1c percentages were associated with a statistically significant increase in colorectal cancer risk (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01, 1.32 for a 10% increase in HbA1c) and with a borderline statistically significant increase in rectum cancer (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.99,1.50 for a 10% increase in HbA1c). No significant association with cancer risk was observed in men. The results of the current study suggest a mild implication of hyperglycemia in colorectal cancer, which seems more important in women than in men, and more for cancer of the rectum than of the colon. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008;17(11):3108-15)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18990751
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; EXPOSURE ; POPULATION ; RISK ; MECHANISM ; REDUCTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; CARCINOGENESIS ; mechanisms ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; HEALTH ; NUMBER ; AGE ; WOMEN ; risk factors ; REQUIRES ; RISK FACTOR ; ORAL-CONTRACEPTIVES ; EPIC ; nutrition ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; menopause ; ONCOLOGY ; LIFE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; ESTROGEN ; PREGNANCY ; BIRTH ; parity ; prospective ; menarche ; VARIABLES ; CANCER-RISK ; OVARIAN ; CORPUS ; oral contraceptive
    Abstract: Endometrial cancer risk has been associated with reproductive factors (age at menarche, age at menopause, parity, age at first and last birth, time since last birth and use of oral contraceptives (OCs)]. However, these factors are closely interrelated and whether they act independently still requires clarification. We conducted a study to examine the association of menstrual and reproductive variables with the risk of endometrial cancer among the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Among the 302,618 women eligible for the study, 1,017 incident endometrial cancer cases were identified. A reduction in endometrial cancer risk was observed in women with late menarche, early menopause, past OC use, high parity and a shorter time since last full-term pregnancy (FTP). No association was observed for duration of breast feeding after adjustment for number of FTP or for abortion (spontaneous or induced). After mutual adjustment, late age at menarche, early age at menopause and duration of OC use showed similar risk reductions of 7-8% per year of menstrual life, whereas the decreased risk associated with cumulative duration of FTPs was stronger (22% per year). In conclusion, our findings confirmed a reduction in risk of endometrial cancer with factors associated with a lower cumulative exposure to estrogen and/or higher exposure to progesterone, such as increasing number of FTPs and shorter menstrual lifespan and, therefore, support an important role of hormonal mechanisms in endometrial carcinogenesis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19924816
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; IN-VITRO ; human ; VITRO ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; incidence ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; ACIDS ; HUMANS ; WOMEN ; risk factors ; cancer risk ; RECRUITMENT ; fatty acids ; DIETARY ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; RELATIVE RISK ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; SERUM PHOSPHOLIPIDS ; ADIPOSE-TISSUE ; POLYUNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; ASSOCIATIONS ; INTERVAL ; prospective ; MEAT INTAKE ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCERS ; CANCER-RISK ; fish consumption ; N-3
    Abstract: There is current interest in fish consumption and marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids and breast cancer risk. Some in vitro and animal studies have suggested an inhibitory effect of marine n-3 fatty acids on breast cancer growth, but the results from epidemiological studies that have examined the association between fish consumption and breast cancer risk in humans are inconsistent. We examined fish consumption and breast cancer risk in 310,671 women aged between 25 and 70 yr at recruitment into the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The participants completed a dietary questionnaire between 1992-98 and were followed up for incidence of breast cancer for a median of 6.4 yr. Hazard ratio for breast cancer by intake of total and lean and fatty fish were estimated, stratified by study centre and adjusted for established breast cancer risk factors. During follow-up, 4,776 invasive incident breast cancers were reported. No significant associations between intake of total fish and breast cancer risk were observed, hazard ratio (HR) 1.01 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.99-1.02; p = 0.28 per 10 g fish/day). When examining lean and ratty fish separately, we round a positive significant association only in the highest quintile for fatty fish (HR 1.13, 95% CI 1.01-1.26), but test for trend was not significant (p = 0.10). No associations with breast cancer risk were observed when the study participants were subdivided by menopausal status. Although the period of follow-up is relatively short, the results provide no evidence for an association between fish intake and breast cancer risk. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16470807
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; RISK ; DISTINCT ; MECHANISM ; HETEROCYCLIC AMINES ; mechanisms ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS ; Jun ; cholesterol ; DIET ; DIETARY ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; FOOD ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; NUTRIENTS ; FRAMEWORK ; RE ; CANCER DEVELOPMENT ; PRESERVATION ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; CANCER-RISK ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; NORTHERN ; processed meat ; 24-hour dietary recall ; ANIMAL PRODUCTS ; CHOLESTEROL OXIDATION ; cooking methods ; DONE RED MEAT
    Abstract: Objective: There is increasing evidence for a significant effect of processed meat (PM) intake on cancer risk. However, refined knowledge on how components of this heterogeneous food group are associated with cancer risk is still missing. Here, actual data on the intake of PM subcategories is given; within a food-based approach we considered preservation methods, cooking methods and nutrient content for stratification, in order to address most of the aetiologically relevant hypotheses. Design and setting: Standardised computerised 24-hour diet recall interviews were collected within the framework of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a prospective cohort study in 27 centres across 10 European countries. Subjects: Subjects were 22 924 women and 13 031 men aged 35 - 74 years. Results: Except for the so-called 'health-conscious' cohort in the UK, energy-adjusted total PM intake ranged between 11.1 and 47.9 g day(-1) in women and 18.8 and 88.5 g day(-1) in men. Ham, salami-type sausages and heated sausages contributed most to the overall PM intake. The intake of cured (addition of nitrate/nitrite) PM was highest in the German, Dutch and northern European EPIC centres, with up to 68.8 g day(-1) in men. The same was true for smoked PM (up to 51.8 g day(-1)). However, due to the different manufacturing practice, the highest average intake of NaNO2 through PM consumption was found for the Spanish centres (5.4 mg day(-1) in men) as compared with German and British centres. Spanish centres also showed the highest intake of NaCl-rich types of PM; most cholesterol- and iron-rich PM was consumed in central and northern European centres. Possibly hazardous cooking methods were more often used for PM preparation in central and northern European centres. Conclusions: We applied a food-based categorisation of PM that addresses aetiologically relevant mechanisms for cancer development and found distinct differences in dietary intake of these categories of PM across European cohorts. This predisposes EPIC to further investigate the role of PM in cancer aetiology
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16870017
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; PROSTATE ; FOLLOW-UP ; DISEASE ; RISK ; RISKS ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; HEALTH ; DESIGN ; PLASMA ; AGE ; MEN ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; RECRUITMENT ; DIETARY ; ALCOHOL ; BODY ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; tocopherols ; RELATIVE RISK ; BETA-CAROTENE ; VITAMIN-E ; HETEROGENEITY ; physical activity ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; carotenoids ; LYCOPENE ; MASS INDEX ; MASSES ; RETINOL ; SERUM ; BODIES ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE ; SUPPLEMENTATION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; LEVEL ; USA ; prospective ; UNIT ; CANCER-RISK ; GAMMA-TOCOPHEROL ; nested case-control study ; micronutrients ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; BODY-MASS ; BODY-MASS-INDEX
    Abstract: Background: Previous studies suggest that high plasma concentrations of carotenoids, retinol, or tocopherols may reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Objective: We aimed to examine the associations between plasma concentrations of 7 carotenoids, retinol, a-tocopherol, and,gamma-tocopherol and prostate cancer risk. Design: A total of 137 001 men in 8 European countries participated. After a mean of 6 y, 966 incident cases of prostate cancer with plasma were available. A total of 1064 control subjects were selected and were matched for study center, age, and date of recruitment. The relative risk of prostate cancer was estimated by conditional logistic regression, which was adjusted for smoking status, alcohol intake, body mass index, marital status, physical activity, and education level. Results: Overall, none of the micronutrients examined were significantly associated with prostate cancer risk. For lycopene and the sum of carotenoids, there was evidence of heterogeneity between the associations with risks of localized and advanced disease. These carotenoids were not associated with the risk of localized disease but were inversely associated with the risk of advanced disease. The risk of advanced disease for men in the highest fifth of plasma concentrations compared with men in the lowest fifth was 0.40 (95% CI: 0. 19, 0.88) for lycopene and 0.35 (95% CI: 0. 17, 0.78) for the sum of carotenoids. Conclusions: We observed no associations between plasma concentrations of carotenoids, retinol, or tocopherols and overall prostate cancer risk. The inverse associations of lycopene and the sum of carotenoids with the risk of advanced disease may involve a protective effect, an association of dietary choice with delayed detection of prostate cancer, reverse causality, or other factors
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17823432
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; PROSTATE ; FOLLOW-UP ; DISEASE ; RISK ; TIME ; INDEX ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; AGE ; MEN ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; RECRUITMENT ; UNITED-STATES ; INDIVIDUALS ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; education ; RELATIVE RISK ; BODIES ; ONCOLOGY ; REGRESSION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; biomarker ; methods ; MASS ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; alcohol consumption ; USA ; prospective ; HIGH-GRADE ; DIETARY ASSESSMENT METHODS ; BMI ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; PREDICTS ; PREDICT ; NOV ; WEIGHT CHANGE ; body mass ; META-REGRESSION ANALYSIS ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; EPIC-OXFORD PARTICIPANTS ; HEALTH-PROFESSIONALS ; IGF BINDING PROTEIN-3
    Abstract: Background: Body size has been hypothesized to influence the risk of prostate cancer; however, most epidemiologic studies have relied on body mass index (BMI) to assess adiposity, whereas only a few studies have examined whether body fat distribution predicts prostate cancer. Methods: We examined the association of height, BMI, waist and hip circumference, and waist-hip ratio with prostate cancer risk among 129,502 men without cancer at baseline from 8 countries of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), using Cox regression, with age as time metric, stratifying by study center and age at recruitment, and adjusting for education, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. Results: During a mean follow-up of 8.5 years, 2,446 men developed prostate cancer. Waist circumference and waist-hip ratio were positively associated with risk of advanced disease. The relative risk of advanced prostate cancer was 1.06 (95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.1) per 5-cm-higher waist circumference and 1.21 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.39) per 0.1-unit-higher waist-hip ratio. When stratified by BMI, waist circumference and waist-hip ratio were positively related to risk of total, advanced, and high-grade prostate cancer among men with lower but not among those with higher BMI (P-interaction for waist with BMI, 0.25, 0.02, and 0.05, respectively; P-interaction for waist-hip ratio with BMI, 0.27, 0.22, and 0.14; respectively). Conclusions: These data suggest that abdominal adiposity may be associated with an increased risk of advanced prostate cancer. This association may be stronger among individuals with lower BMI; however, this finding needs confirmation in future studies. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008;17(11):3252-61)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18990768
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