Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; AGENTS ; CELL ; MODEL ; MODELS ; neoplasms ; FOLLOW-UP ; SYSTEM ; COHORT ; cohort study ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; HISTORY ; incidence ; RISK ; INFECTION ; MECHANISM ; primary ; RISK-FACTORS ; mechanisms ; T cell ; T-CELL ; ASSOCIATION ; DISORDER ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; NO ; LYMPHOMA ; CARE ; DESIGN ; PLASMA ; AGE ; WOMEN ; etiology ; MEN ; risk factors ; leukemia ; Jun ; diabetes ; ABNORMALITIES ; INFECTIONS ; EPIC ; nutrition ; immunosuppression ; non-hodgkin's lymphoma ; CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC-LEUKEMIA ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; VIRAL-INFECTION ; insulin ; MELLITUS ; AGENT ; AUTOIMMUNITY ; multiple myeloma ; DISORDERS ; MEDICAL HISTORY ; INCREASE ; T-CELL LYMPHOMA ; prospective studies ; methods ; SUBTYPES ; metabolic syndrome ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; prospective study ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCERS ; B-CELL ; ENGLAND ; ENVIRONMENTAL-FACTORS ; host ; INCREASES ; viral ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; non-Hodgkin ; neoplasm ; INTERLEUKIN-6 GENE
    Abstract: Background Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms arising from the lymphopoietic system including a wide range of subtypes of either B-cell or T-cell lymphomas. The few established risk factors for the development of these neoplasms include viral infections and immunological abnormalities, but their etiology remains largely unknown. Evidence suggests that certain medical conditions may be linked, through immunosuppression, to the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Multiple myeloma is a neoplasm of plasma cells that accounts for approximately 15% of lymphopoietic cancers. Increases in the incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in the past implicate environmental factors as potential causal agents. Design and Methods In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 1,213 histologically confirmed incident cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma (594 men; 619 women) were identified during a follow-up of 8.5 years. Cox proportional hazard models were used to explore the association between self-reported diabetes, diagnosed after 30 years of age, and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall and multiple myeloma and various lymphoma subtypes. Results We found no association between a personal history of diabetes and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall in men (HR: 1.28, 95% CI: 0.89-1.84), in women (HR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.41-1.24), or in men and women combined (HR: 1.09, 95% CI: 0.80-1.47). Among the B-non-Hodgkin's lymphoma subtypes, we observed a statistically significant increased risk of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (HR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.04-3.86) in men, but not in women (HR: 1.07, 95% CI: 0.33-3.43). Conclusions This prospective study did not provide evidence for a role of self-reported diabetes in the etiology of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall or multiple myeloma. We found an increased risk of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia among men with diabetes, but not among women. We hypothesize that diabetes may not play a causal role in the etiology of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, though the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of both disorders may include shared genetic, host and/or environmental susceptibility factors
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18443270
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; carcinoma ; CELL ; PATHWAYS ; CLASSIFICATION ; DIAGNOSIS ; GENE ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; RNA ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; TUMORS ; PATIENT ; NF-KAPPA-B ; INDEX ; DOWN-REGULATION ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; PROGRESSION ; gene expression ; DESIGN ; AGE ; METASTASIS ; PHENOTYPE ; CANCER-PATIENTS ; CARCINOMAS ; experimental design ; BEHAVIOR ; CANCER PATIENTS ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; GRADE ; ESTROGEN ; analysis ; SUBTYPES ; CHIP ; SIGNATURE ; USA ; cancer research ; VARIABLES ; MOTILITY ; NOV ; aggressiveness ; PROFILE ; response ; CELL MOTILITY ; expression profile ; neoplasm ; POOR SURVIVAL ; HISTOLOGIC GRADE ; SIGNATURES
    Abstract: Purpose: We hypothesize that a gene expression profile characteristic for inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), an aggressive form of breast cancer associated with rapid cancer dissemination and poor survival, might be related to tumor aggressiveness in non-IBC (nIBC). Experimental Design: RNA from 17 IBC samples and 40 nIBC samples was hybridized onto Affymetrix chips. A gene signature predictive of IBC was identified and applied onto 1,157 nIBC samples with survival data of 881 nIBC samples. Samples were classified as IBC-like or nIBC-like. The IBC signature classification was compared with the classifications according to other prognostically relevant gene signatures and clinicopathologic variables. In addition, relapse-free survival (RFS) was compared by the Kaplan-Meyer method. Results: Classification according to the IBC signature is significantly (P 〈 0.05) associated with the cell-of-origin subtypes, the wound healing response, the invasive gene signature, the genomic grade index, the fibroblastic neoplasm signature, and the 70-gene prognostic signature. Significant associations (P 〈 0.01) were found between the IBC signature and tumor grade, estrogen receptor status, ErbB2 status, and patient age at diagnosis. Patients with an IBC-like phenotype show a significantly shorter RFS interval (P 〈 0.05). Oncomine analysis identified cell motility as an important concept linked with the IBC signature. Conclusions:We show that nIBC carcinomas having an IBC-like phenotype have a reduced RFS interval. This suggests that IBC and nIBC show comparable phenotypic traits, for example augmented cell motility, with respect to aggressive tumor cell behavior. This observation lends credit to the use of IBC to study aggressive tumor cell behavior
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19010862
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; tumor ; CELL ; MODEL ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; GENE ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; RNA ; DIFFERENTIATION ; TUMORS ; ACTIVATION ; BINDING ; BIOLOGY ; TARGET ; CHROMATIN ; gene expression ; PROMOTER ; genetics ; MODULATION ; C-MYC ; REPRESSION ; TRANSCRIPTIONAL REPRESSION ; MYCN ; neuroblastoma ; N-MYC ; signaling ; ONCOLOGY ; B-CELL LYMPHOMAS ; miRNA ; outcome ; MICRORNA ; CELL BIOLOGY ; Genetic ; COHORTS ; EXPRESSION SIGNATURES ; PATHWAY DEREGULATION
    Abstract: Increased activity of MYC protein-family members is a common feature in many cancers. Using neuroblastoma as a tumor model, we established a microRNA (miRNA) signature for activated MYCN/c-MYC signaling in two independent primary neuroblastoma tumor cohorts and provide evidence that c-MYC and MYCN have overlapping functions. On the basis of an integrated approach including miRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) gene expression data we show that miRNA activation contributes to widespread mRNA repression, both in c-MYC- and MYCN-activated tumors. c-MYC/MYCN-induced miRNA activation was shown to be dependent on c-MYC/MYCN promoter binding as evidenced by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Finally, we show that pathways, repressed through c-MYC/MYCN miRNA activation, are highly correlated to tumor aggressiveness and are conserved across different tumor entities suggesting that c-MYC/MYCN activate a core set of miRNAs for cooperative repression of common transcriptional programs related to disease aggressiveness. Our results uncover a widespread correlation between miRNA activation and c-MYC/MYCN-mediated coding gene expression modulation and further substantiate the overlapping functions of c-MYC and MYCN in the process of tumorigenesis. Oncogene (2010) 29, 1394-1404; doi:10.1038/onc.2009.429; published online 30 November 2009
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19946337
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: CELLS ; CELL ; IN-VIVO ; MODEL ; VIVO ; SYSTEM ; SITE ; SITES ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; ACCUMULATION ; COMPLEX ; COMPLEXES ; DNA ; BINDING ; BIOLOGY ; TARGET ; LESIONS ; CHROMATIN ; DNA-REPAIR ; REPAIR ; MAMMALIAN-CELLS ; NETHERLANDS ; LIVING CELLS ; NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION-REPAIR ; DNA repair ; XERODERMA-PIGMENTOSUM ; POLYMERASE-II TRANSCRIPTION ; assembly ; LIFE ; fluorescent proteins ; CELL BIOLOGY ; Protein Binding ; PROTEIN-BINDING ; COMPLEMENTATION GROUP-A ; GROUP-A PROTEIN ; IN-VIVO DYNAMICS ; TARGET SITE ; UV-DAMAGED DNA
    Abstract: To understand how multiprotein complexes assemble and function on chromatin, we combined quantitative analysis of the mammalian nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) machinery in living cells with computational modeling. We found that individual NER components exchange within tens of seconds between the bound state in repair complexes and the diffusive state in the nucleoplasm, whereas their net accumulation at repair sites evolves over several hours. Based on these in vivo data, we developed a predictive kinetic model for the assembly and function of repair complexes. DNA repair is orchestrated by the interplay of reversible protein-binding events and progressive enzymatic modifications of the chromatin substrate. We demonstrate that faithful recognition of DNA lesions is time consuming, whereas subsequently, repair complexes form rapidly through random and reversible assembly of NER proteins. Our kinetic analysis of the NER system reveals a fundamental conflict between specificity and efficiency of chromatin-associated protein machineries and shows how a trade off is negotiated through reversibility of protein binding
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20439997
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Keywords: CELL ; IN-VIVO ; imaging ; SYSTEM ; SYSTEMS ; GENOME ; RNA ; transcription ; COMPLEX ; COMPLEXES ; DNA ; MECHANISM ; mechanisms ; DYNAMICS ; BIOLOGY ; ASSOCIATION ; DNA-REPAIR ; DNA-DAMAGE ; NETHERLANDS ; specificity ; LIVING CELLS ; NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION-REPAIR ; DNA repair ; POLYMERASE-II TRANSCRIPTION ; review ; LIFE ; USA ; PROTEIN XPC
    Abstract: Live-cell imaging studies aided by mathematical modeling have provided unprecedented insight into assembly mechanisms of multiprotein complexes that control genome function. Such studies have unveiled emerging properties of chromatin-associated systems involved in DNA repair and transcription
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19332890
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...