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  • 1
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; IN-VITRO ; IRRADIATION ; proliferation ; SURVIVAL ; CELL ; COMBINATION ; IN-VIVO ; VIVO ; GENERATION ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; transcription ; MICE ; ACTIVATION ; DNA ; TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ; ANTIGEN ; T cell ; T cells ; T-CELL ; T-CELLS ; BINDING ; PHOSPHORYLATION ; CELL-SURVIVAL ; ELEMENT ; ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN ; knockout ; MUTANT ; NO ; TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS ; TRANSGENIC MICE ; PROMOTER ; transgenic ; RESPONSIVE ELEMENT ; T lymphocyte ; OVEREXPRESSION ; rodent ; T lymphocytes ; BINDING PROTEIN ; thymus ; BINDING-PROTEIN ; IL-2 PRODUCTION ; MOLECULAR-BASIS
    Abstract: Recent generation of genetically modified Creb1 mutant mice has revealed an important role for CREB (CAMP responsive element binding protein) and the related proteins CREM (CAMP responsive element modulator) and ATF1 (activating transcription factor 1) in cell survival, in agreement with previous studies using overexpression of dominant-negative CREB (dnCREB). CREB and ATF1 are abundantly expressed in T cells and are rapidly activated by phosphorylation when T cells are stimulated through the T cell antigen receptor. We show that T cell-specific loss of CREB in mice, in combination with the loss of ATF1, results in reduced thymic cellularity and delayed thymic recovery following sublethal irradiation but no changes in T cell development or activation. These data show that loss of CREB function has specific effects on thymic T lymphocyte proliferation and homeostasis in vivo
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15214044
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  • 2
    Keywords: CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; MOUSE-BRAIN ; TRANSGENIC MICE ; CRE ; KeyWords Plus: SITE-SPECIFIC RECOMBINATION
    Abstract: We describe the generation of transgenic mouse lines expressing the Cre recombinase enzyme in brain under control of the CamKIIalpha gene present in a BAC expression vector. The CamKIIalpha BAC transgene gave a faithful expression pattern resembling the pattern of the endogenous CamKIIalpha gene. Specifically, high levels of CamKIIalpha Cre were detected in hippocampus, cortex, and amygdala, and lower levels were detected in striatum, thalamus, and hypothalamus. As expected, no expression was detected in the cerebellum or outside of the brain. The expression level of the BAC CamKIIalpha driven Cre was shown to be copy number dependent. To test the activity of the Cre recombinase, the transgenic mice were crossed with mice harbouring the CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) allele with the 10th exon flanked by two loxP sites, and recombination was monitored by the disappearance of the CREB protein. Finally, evaluation of the developmental postnatal expression of the CamKIIalpha Cre BAC revealed the expression of the Cre recombinase as early as P3.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 11668676
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  • 3
    Keywords: brain ; PEPTIDE ; RECEPTOR ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; INHIBITOR ; BLOOD ; CELL ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; transcription ; METABOLISM ; MICE ; RELEASE ; ACTIVATION ; TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ; IMPACT ; hepatocytes ; BINDING ; PHOSPHORYLATION ; SIGNAL ; ACID ; CREB ; ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN ; TRANSGENIC MICE ; hormone ; DISRUPTION ; BODY ; MUTANT MICE ; HYPOPLASIA ; BINDING PROTEIN ; LOSSES ; SIGNALS ; EXPANSION ; CAMP RESPONSE ELEMENT ; CREB FUNCTION ; HORMONE-RELEASING-HORMONE ; NEURAL STEM
    Abstract: The principal regulation of body growth is via a cascade of hormone signals emanating from the hypothalamus, by release of GHRH, which then directs the somatotroph cells of the pituitary to release GH into the blood stream. This in turn leads to activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5-dependent expression of genes such as IGF-1 in hepatocytes, acid labile substance, and serine protease inhibitor 2.1, resulting in body growth. Here, using conditional cAMP response element binding protein ( CREB) mutant mice, we show that loss of the CREB transcription factor in the brain, but not the pituitary, results in reduced postnatal growth consistent with dwarfism caused by GH deficiency. We demonstrate that although there appears to be no significant impact upon the expression of GHRH mRNA in CREB mutant mice, the amount of GHRH peptide is reduced. These findings show that CREB is required for the efficient production of GHRH in hypothalamus, in addition to its previously reported role in pituitary GH production and somatotroph expansion
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16141355
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