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    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; tumor ; Germany ; PROSTATE ; DISEASE ; GENE ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; GENES ; RNA ; TISSUE ; SURGERY ; TIME ; PATIENT ; REPERFUSION ; TISSUES ; BIOLOGY ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; gene expression ; EXPRESSION ANALYSIS ; microarrays ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; DEGRADATION ; NETHERLANDS ; ISCHEMIA ; BIOPSY ; HYPOXIA ; molecular ; CHAIN ; PATTERN ; TUMOR TISSUE ; LEVEL ; methods ; ISCHEMIA TIME ; quantitative
    Abstract: Objectives: Gene expression analyses have become an important approach to understand the biology of cancer. However, transcript level patterns and RNA quality could rapidly change in response to ischemic and mechanical stress. Studies have shown that this occurs both perioperatively and after surgical removal of organs. Methods: To better understand the relative importance of perioperative and postoperative gene expression changes, we performed quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions on the transcripts of 91 cancer-related genes from normal and cancerous prostate tissues from 10 patients at eight different time points during surgical manipulation and after removal of the prostate. Results: The mRNA levels of 8 (EGR1, p21, KRT17, PIM1, S100P, TNFRSF, WFDC2, and TRIM29) of 91 genes changed significantly with time of surgery in normal and tumor tissue. Remarkably, all eight genes were up-regulated, a reaction that was most prominent during the early intraoperative period. Additional changes occurred but were much less prominent during the first postoperative hour. Conclusions: Our results substantially challenge the utility of immediate postoperative tissue sampling. At least for prostate cancer, the data suggest that preoperative tissue collection by core biopsies is optimal for studying molecular changes in normal and neoplastic prostate tissues. (c) 2007 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier BY. All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17448597
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