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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; lung cancer ; SUPPORT ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; HETEROCYCLIC AMINES ; ASSOCIATION ; WOMEN ; FISH ; DIET ; FAT ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; meat ; CALIBRATION ; DIETARY HABITS ; RECALLS ; HEME IRON ; MUTAGENS
    Abstract: Evidence from case-control studies, but less so from cohort studies, suggests a positive association between meat intake and risk of lung cancer. Therefore, this association was evaluated in the frame of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, EPIC. Data from 478,021 participants, recruited from 10 European countries, who completed a dietary questionnaire in 1992-2000 were evaluated; 1,822 incident primary lung cancer cases were included in the present evaluation. Relative risk estimates were calculated for categories of meat intake using multi-variably adjusted Cox proportional hazard models. In addition, the continuous intake variables were calibrated by means of 24-h diet recall data to account for part of the measurement error. There were no consistent associations between meat consumption and the risk of lung cancer. Neither red meat (RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.89-1.27 per 50 g intake/day; calibrated model) nor processed meat (RR = 1.13, 95% CI 0.95-1.34 per 50 g/day; calibrated model) was significantly related to an increased risk of lung cancer. Also, consumption of white meat and fish was not associated with the risk of lung cancer. These findings do not support the hypothesis that a high intake of red and processed meat is a risk factor for lung cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21479828
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; COHORT ; RISK ; IMPACT ; CARCINOGENESIS ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; VARIANTS ; HEALTH ; PLASMA ; AGE ; colorectal cancer ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; FIBER ; COLON-CANCER ; MASS-SPECTROMETRY ; EPIC ; nutrition ; education ; NESTED CASE-CONTROL ; physical activity ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; VARIANT ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; biomarker ; methods ; dietary patterns ; GENOTYPE ; LOCUS ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; nested case-control study ; COMMON MUTATION ; MTHFR POLYMORPHISMS ; FOLIC-ACID ; Genetic ; FOLATE STATUS ; METHYLENETETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE POLYMORPHISM ; nested case control study ; C677T MTHFR POLYMORPHISM ; CARBON METABOLIC PATHWAY ; HUMAN METHIONINE SYNTHASE
    Abstract: Background: A potential dual role of folate in colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently subject to debate. We investigate the associations between plasma folate, several relevant folate-related polymorphisms, and CRC risk within the large European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Methods: In this nested case-control study, 1,367 incident CRC cases were matched to 2,325 controls for study center, age, and sex. Risk ratios (RR) were estimated with conditional logistic regression and adjusted for smoking, education, physical activity, and intake of alcohol and fiber. Results: Overall analyses did not reveal associations of plasma folate with CRC. The RR (95% confidence interval; P-trend) for the fifth versus the first quintile of folate status was 0.94 (0.74-1.20; 0.44). The polymorphisms MTHFR677C -〉 T, MTHFR1298A -〉 C, MTR2756A -〉 G, MTRR66A -〉 G, and MTHFD11958G -〉 A were not associated with CRC risk. However, in individuals with the lowest plasma folate concentrations, the MTHFR 677TT genotype showed a statistically nonsignificant increased CRC risk [RR (95% CI; P-trend) TT versus CC = 1.39 (0.87-2.21); 0.12], whereas those with the highest folate concentrations showed a nonsignificant decreased CRC risk [RR TT versus CC = 0.74 (0.39-1.37); 0.34]. The SLC19A180G -〉 A showed a positive association with CRC risk [RR AA versus GG 1.30 (1.06-1.59); 〈0.01]. Conclusions: This large European prospective multicenter study did not show an association of CRC risk with plasma folate status nor with MTHFR polymorphisms. Impact: Findings of the present study tend to weaken the evidence that folate plays an important role in CRC carcinogenesis. However, larger sample sizes are needed to adequately address potential gene-environment interactions. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(5); 1328-40. (C)2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20447924
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  • 3
    Keywords: COHORT ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY ; OVERWEIGHT ; LYMPHOHEMATOPOIETIC MALIGNANCIES ; ADULT LEUKEMIA
    Abstract: PURPOSE: Overweight and obesity have been suggested as a risk factor for leukemia. Impaired immune function associated with obesity, increased insulin-like growth factor-I activity and stimulating effects of leptin suggest a possible biological link between anthropometric measures and leukemia. However, evidence from epidemiological studies has been inconsistent. We examined the potential association between prospective measurements of body size and risk of leukemia among participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: During follow-up (mean = 11.52 years, standard deviation = 2.63), 671 leukemia (lymphoid leukemia = 50.1 %, myeloid leukemia = 43.2 %) cases were identified. Anthropometric measures including weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were measured. Cox proportional hazard models were used to explore the association between anthropometric measures and risk of leukemia. RESULTS: No associations were observed between anthropometric measures and total leukemia, and lymphoid leukemia. Risk of myeloid leukemia significantly increased for higher categories of BMI and WC among women. Analyses by subtype of myeloid leukemia showed an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) for higher categories of WHR among women. This association seemed to be reversed for chronic myeloid leukemia. No association between anthropometric measures and myeloid leukemia were observed among men except an increased risk of AML with height. CONCLUSION: The study showed no associations between anthropometric measures and total leukemia, and lymphoid leukemia among men and women. A possible association between BMI as general obesity and WC as abdominal obesity and increased risk of myeloid leukemia among women were observed.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23288400
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