Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • CONSUMPTION  (4)
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; CELL ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SYSTEM ; cohort study ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; LYMPHOMA ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; etiology ; risk factors ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; B-CELL LYMPHOMA ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; ONCOLOGY ; DIETARY FACTORS ; ASSOCIATIONS ; IMMUNE-SYSTEM ; non-Hodgkin lymphoma ; INTERVAL ; FRUITS ; methods ; function ; prospective ; prospective study ; RISK-FACTOR ; HODGKIN LYMPHOMA ; B-CELL ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; DRINKING-WATER NITRATE
    Abstract: Introduction Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant diseases of cells of the immune system. The best-established risk factors are related to dys-regulation of immune function, and evidence suggests that factors such as dietary or lifestyle habits may be involved in the etiology. Material and methods In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 849 lymphoma cases were identified in a median follow-up period of 6.4 years. Fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated from validated dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association between fruit and vegetable intake with the risk of lymphomas overall and subentities. Results There was no overall association between total fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphoma [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-1.15 comparing highest with lowest quartile]. However, the risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) tended to be lower in participants with a high intake of total vegetables (HR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.23-1.02). Conclusion In this large prospective study, an inverse associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphomas overall could not be confirmed. Associations with lymphoma subentities such as DLBCL warrant further investigation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17443415
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; LIFE-STYLE ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; COFFEE ; DRINKING-WATER ; RELATIVE VALIDITY ; FLUID ; LOWER URINARY-TRACT ; DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS ; urothelial cell carcinomas
    Abstract: Results from previous studies investigating the association between fluid intake and urothelial cell carcinomas (UCC) are inconsistent. We evaluated this association among 233,236 subjects in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), who had adequate baseline information on water and total fluid intake. During a mean follow-up of 9.3 years, 513 first primary UCC occurred. At recruitment, habitual fluid intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable hazard ratios were estimated using Cox regression stratified by age, sex and center and adjusted for energy intake, smoking status, duration of smoking and lifetime intensity of smoking. When using the lowest tertile of intake as reference, total fluid intake was not associated with risk of all UCC (HR 1.12; 95% CI 0.86-1.45, p-trend = 0.42) or with risk of prognostically high-risk UCC (HR 1.28; 95% CI 0.85-1.93, p-trend = 0.27) or prognostically low-risk UCC (HR 0.93; 95% CI 0.65-1.33, p-trend = 0.74). No associations were observed between risk of UCC and intake of water, coffee, tea and herbal tea and milk and other dairy beverages. For prognostically low-risk UCC suggestions of an inverse association with alcoholic beverages and of a positive association with soft drinks were seen. Increased risks were found for all UCC and prognostically low-risk UCC with higher intake of fruit and vegetable juices. In conclusion, total usual fluid intake is not associated with UCC risk in EPIC. The relationships observed for some fluids may be due to chance, but further investigation of the role of all types of fluid is warranted
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20715171
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: POPULATION ; METABOLISM ; smoking ; CONSUMPTION ; CALIBRATION ; antioxidants ; BETA-CAROTENE ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; SERUM ; COHORTS
    Abstract: Evidence of a protective effect of several antioxidants and other nutrients on pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association for prediagnostic plasma levels of carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols with risk of pancreatic cancer in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). 446 incident exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were matched to 446 controls by age at blood collection, study center, sex, date and time of blood collection, fasting status and hormone use. Plasma carotenoids (- and -carotene, lycopene, -cryptoxanthin, canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein), - and -tocopherol and retinol were measured by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography and plasma vitamin C by a colorimetric assay. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for pancreatic cancer risk were estimated using a conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for smoking status, smoking duration and intensity, waist circumference, cotinine levels and diabetes status. Inverse associations with pancreatic cancer risk were found for plasma -carotene (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.52, 95%CI 0.31-0.88, p for trend=0.02), zeaxanthin (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.53, 95%CI 0.30-0.94, p for trend=0.06) and -tocopherol (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.62, 95%CI 0.39-0.99, p for trend=0.08. For - and -carotene, lutein, sum of carotenoids and -tocopherol, heterogeneity between geographical regions was observed. In conclusion, our results show that higher plasma concentrations of -carotene, zeaxanthin and -tocopherol may be inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, but further studies are warranted. What's new? Fruits and vegetables may play a role in the prevention of pancreatic cancer, but associations between the antioxidants those foods contain and disease risk remain unclear. In this study, pancreatic cancer risk was inversely associated with increased prediagnostic plasma concentrations of the antioxidants -carotene, zeaxanthin, and -tocopherol. Geographic variations were also detected. In Northern European countries, inverse associations with risk were found for blood levels of several carotenoids, whereas the association was strongest for -tocopherol in Southern European countries. The role of carotenoids and vitamins should be considered in subsequent investigations of the etiology of pancreatic cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25175624
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; colon ; ASSOCIATION ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; REDUCED RISK ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FIBER ; COLON-CANCER ; NETHERLANDS ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; BETA-CAROTENE ; colon cancer ; EPIC PROJECT ; pooled analysis ; USA ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; colorectal ; RECTAL CANCERS ; CRC
    Abstract: Background: A high consumption of fruit and vegetables is possibly associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the findings to date are inconsistent. Objective: We examined the relation between self-reported usual consumption of fruit and vegetables and the incidence of CRC. Design: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 452,755 subjects (131,985 men and 320,770 women) completed a dietary questionnaire in 1992-2000 and were followed up for cancer incidence and mortality until 2006. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. Results: After an average follow-up of 8.8 y, 2,819 incident CRC cases were reported. Consumption of fruit and vegetables was inversely associated with CRC in a comparison of the highest with the lowest EPIC-wide quintile of consumption (HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.75, 1.00; P for trend 0.04), particularly with colon cancer risk (HR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.91; P for trend 〈 0.01). Only after exclusion of the first 2 y of follow-up were these findings corroborated by calibrated continuous analyses for a 100-g increase in consumption: HRs of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.00; P 0.04) and 0.94 (95% CI: 0.89, 0.99; P = 0.02), respectively. The association between fruit and vegetable consumption and CRC risk was inverse in never and former smokers, but positive in current smokers. This modifying effect was found for fruit and vegetables combined and for vegetables alone (P for interaction, 0.01 for both). Conclusions: These findings suggest that a high consumption of fruit and vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of CRC, especially of colon cancer. This effect may depend on smoking status. Am J Clin Nutr 2009;89:1441-52
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19339391
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...