Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • COUNTRIES  (17)
Collection
Keywords
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; LUNG ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; cohort study ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; EXPOSURE ; MORTALITY ; occupation ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; REDUCTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; HUMANS ; WOMEN ; MEN ; risk factors ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; POPULATIONS ; DIET ; VALIDITY ; EPIC ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; RELATIVE RISK ; exercise ; physical activity ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; INTERVAL ; SUBTYPES ; prospective ; UNIT ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; sports ; occupations ; ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE
    Abstract: Research conducted predominantly in male populations on physical activity and lung cancer has yielded inconsistent results. We examined this relationship among 416,277 men and women from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Detailed information on recent recreational, household and occupational physical activity, smoking habits and diet was assessed at baseline between 1992 and 2000. Relative risks (RR) were estimated using Cox regression. During 6.3 years of follow-up we identified 607 men and 476 women with incident lung cancer. We did not observe an inverse association between recent occupational, recreational or household physical activity and lung cancer risk in either males or females. However, we found some reduction in lung cancer risk associated with sports in males (adjusted RR = 0.71; 95% confidence interval 0.50-0.98; highest tertile vs. inactive group), cycling (RR = 0.73; 0.54-0.99) in females and non-occupational vigorous physical activity. For occupational physical activity, lung cancer risk was increased for unemployed men (adjusted RR = 1.57; 1.20-2.05) and men with standing occupations (RR = 1.35; 1.02-1.79) compared with sitting professions. There was no evidence of heterogeneity of physical activity associations across countries, or across any of the considered cofactors. For some histologic subtypes suggestive sex-specific reductions, limited by subgroup sizes, were observed, especially with vigorous physical activity. In total, our study shows no consistent protective associations of physical activity with lung cancer risk. It can be assumed that the elevated risks found for occupational physical activity are not produced mechanistically by physical activity itself but rather reflect exposure to occupation-related lung cancer risk factors. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16894558
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; CELL ; LUNG ; LUNG-CANCER ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; GENE ; GENES ; GENOME ; PROTEIN ; TISSUE ; MARKER ; TISSUES ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; ACID ; COUNTRIES ; REGION ; FRANCE ; EPITHELIAL-CELLS ; RECEPTORS ; SMOKERS ; DEPENDENCE ; SNPs ; NEURONS ; CANDIDATE ; ENGLAND ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; NUCLEOTIDE ; FAGERSTROM TOLERANCE QUESTIONNAIRE ; HAPLOTYPE MAP
    Abstract: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death worldwide, with over one million cases annually(1). To identify genetic factors that modify disease risk, we conducted a genome- wide association study by analysing 317,139 single- nucleotide polymorphisms in 1,989 lung cancer cases and 2,625 controls from six central European countries. We identified a locus in chromosome region 15q25 that was strongly associated with lung cancer ( P= 9 x 10(-10)). This locus was replicated in five separate lung cancer studies comprising an additional 2,513 lung cancer cases and 4,752 controls ( P = 5 x 10(-20) overall), and it was found to account for 14%( attributable risk) of lung cancer cases. Statistically similar risks were observed irrespective of smoking status or propensity to smoke tobacco. The association region contains several genes, including three that encode nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits ( CHRNA5, CHRNA3 and CHRNB4). Such subunits are expressed in neurons and other tissues, in particular alveolar epithelial cells, pulmonary neuroendocrine cells and lung cancer cell lines(2,3), and they bind to N'- nitrosonornicotine and potential lung carcinogens(4). A non- synonymous variant of CHRNA5 that induces an amino acid substitution ( D398N) at a highly conserved site in the second intracellular loop of the protein is among the markers with the strongest disease associations. Our results provide compelling evidence of a locus at 15q25 predisposing to lung cancer, and reinforce interest in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as potential disease candidates and chemopreventative targets(5)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18385738
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SUPPORT ; DEATH ; RISK ; RISKS ; TIME ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; RECRUITMENT ; PREDICTION ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; RELATIVE RISK ; BODIES ; REGRESSION ; WEIGHT ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; LEVEL ; analysis ; methods ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY ; alcohol consumption ; USA ; prospective ; BMI ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION ; MEDICINE ; NOV ; body mass ; RATIO ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; PREDICTING MORTALITY ; ROC CURVE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND Previous studies have relied predominantly on the body-mass index (BMI, the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) to assess the association of adiposity with the risk of death, but few have examined whether the distribution of body fat contributes to the prediction of death. METHODS We examined the association of BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio with the risk of death among 359,387 participants from nine countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We used a Cox regression analysis, with age as the time variable, and stratified the models according to study center and age at recruitment, with further adjustment for educational level, smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and height. RESULTS During a mean follow-up of 9.7 years, 14,723 participants died. The lowest risks of death related to BMI were observed at a BMI of 25.3 for men and 24.3 for women. After adjustment for BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were strongly associated with the risk of death. Relative risks among men and women in the highest quintile of waist circumference were 2.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.80 to 2.33) and 1.78 (95% CI, 1.56 to 2.04), respectively, and in the highest quintile of waist-to-hip ratio, the relative risks were 1.68 (95% CI, 1.53 to 1.84) and 1.51 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.66), respectively. BMI remained significantly associated with the risk of death in models that included waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio (P〈0.001). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that both general adiposity and abdominal adiposity are associated with the risk of death and support the use of waist circumference or waist-tohip ratio in addition to BMI in assessing the risk of death
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19005195
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; RISK ; INFECTION ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; HEALTH ; MEN ; COUNTRIES ; DIET ; NETHERLANDS ; STOMACH ; adenocarcinoma ; EPIC ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; physical activity ; ONCOLOGY ; POPULATION-BASED COHORT ; SCALE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; METAANALYSIS ; SUBTYPES ; prospective ; CANCERS ; VARIABLES ; Helicobacter pylori ; stomach cancer ; BODY-MASS ; tumours ; gastric adenocarcinoma ; Type ; EURGAST ; REGISTER ; Oesophagus cancer
    Abstract: To analyse the association between types of physical activity (occupational, recreational and household, vigorous and overall) and risk of primary oesophageal (OAC) or gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC). From nine European countries, 420,449 participants were recruited between 1991 and 2000 and followed-up for a mean of 8.8 years to register incident GAC and OAC. Information on physical activity (PA), diet, lifestyle and health-related variables was obtained at baseline. Helicobacter pylori infection status was considered in a subset of 1,211 participants. Analyses were repeated by tumour site (cardia/non-cardia) and histological type (intestinal/diffuse). During the follow-up, 410 GAC and 80 OAC occurred. A lower risk of overall and non-cardia GAC was found for increasing levels of a PA index which combined occupational PA with weekly time spent in sports and cycling. The hazard ratio (HR) of GAC was 0.69, 95% CI: 0.50-0.94, for the comparison between active and inactive participants according to the PA index (HR = 0.44, 95% CI:0.26-0.74, for non-cardia GAC). No effect was found for cardia tumours or histological subtypes of GAC. PA of any kind was not associated with OAC. Overall and distal (non-cardia) gastric tumours were inversely associated with time spent on cycling and sports and a total PA index. No association was found for any type of PA and risk of cardia cancers of the stomach
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20052611
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; INTERVENTION ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; DESIGN ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; DIET ; FAT ; BLOOD-PRESSURE ; ALCOHOL ; PROJECT ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; CALIBRATION ; MANAGEMENT ; physical activity ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PATTERN ; WEIGHT ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; LOW-CARBOHYDRATE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; dietary patterns ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; WEIGHT CHANGE ; RANDOMIZED CLINICAL-TRIAL ; Lead ; Follow up ; weight gain ; OBESE ADULTS ; PLASMA LEPTIN ; PROTEIN DIET
    Abstract: Background: Meat intake may be related to weight gain because of its high energy and fat content. Some observational studies have shown that meat consumption is positively associated with weight gain, but intervention studies have shown mixed results. Objective: Our objective was to assess the association between consumption of total meat, red meat, poultry, and processed meat and weight gain after 5 y of follow-up, on average, in the large European population who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol, Cessation of Smoking, Eating Out of Home and Obesity (EPIC-PANACEA) project. Design: A total of 103,455 men and 270,348 women aged 25-70 y were recruited between 1992 and 2000 in 10 European countries. Diet was assessed at baseline with the use of country-specific validated questionnaires. A dietary calibration study was conducted in a representative subsample of the cohort. Weight and height were measured at baseline and self-reported at follow-up in most centers. Associations between energy from meat (kcal/d) and annual weight change (g/y) were assessed with the use of linear mixed models, controlled for age, sex, total energy intake, physical activity, dietary patterns, and other potential confounders. Results: Total meat consumption was positively associated with weight gain in men and women, in normal-weight and overweight subjects, and in smokers and nonsmokers. With adjustment for estimated energy intake, an increase in meat intake of 250 g/d (eg, one steak at approximate to 450 kcal) would lead to a 2-kg higher weight gain after 5 y (95% CI: 1.5, 2.7 kg). Positive associations were observed for red meat, poultry, and processed meat. Conclusion: Our results suggest that a decrease in meat consumption may improve weight management. Am J Clin Nutr 2010; 92: 398-407
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20592131
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Keywords: RISK ; HEALTH ; OBESITY ; COUNTRIES ; VALIDITY ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE ; PARTICIPANTS ; LIFE EXPECTANCY ; COLLEGE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: The higher risk of death resulting from excess adiposity may be attenuated by physical activity (PA). However, the theoretical number of deaths reduced by eliminating physical inactivity compared with overall and abdominal obesity remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether overall and abdominal adiposity modified the association between PA and all-cause mortality and estimated the population attributable fraction (PAF) and the years of life gained for these exposures. DESIGN: This was a cohort study in 334,161 European men and women. The mean follow-up time was 12.4 y, corresponding to 4,154,915 person-years. Height, weight, and waist circumference (WC) were measured in the clinic. PA was assessed with a validated self-report instrument. The combined associations between PA, BMI, and WC with mortality were examined with Cox proportional hazards models, stratified by center and age group, and adjusted for sex, education, smoking, and alcohol intake. Center-specific PAF associated with inactivity, body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) (〉30), and WC (〉/=102 cm for men, 〉/=88 cm for women) were calculated and combined in random-effects meta-analysis. Life-tables analyses were used to estimate gains in life expectancy for the exposures. RESULTS: Significant interactions (PA x BMI and PA x WC) were observed, so HRs were estimated within BMI and WC strata. The hazards of all-cause mortality were reduced by 16-30% in moderately inactive individuals compared with those categorized as inactive in different strata of BMI and WC. Avoiding all inactivity would theoretically reduce all-cause mortality by 7.35% (95% CI: 5.88%, 8.83%). Corresponding estimates for avoiding obesity (BMI 〉30) were 3.66% (95% CI: 2.30%, 5.01%). The estimates for avoiding high WC were similar to those for physical inactivity. CONCLUSION: The greatest reductions in mortality risk were observed between the 2 lowest activity groups across levels of general and abdominal adiposity, which suggests that efforts to encourage even small increases in activity in inactive individuals may be beneficial to public health.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25733647
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; RISK ; ENZYMES ; GENE ; GENES ; ACTIVATION ; DNA ; CARCINOGENESIS ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; AGE ; CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; COUNTRIES ; GENOTYPES ; COLORECTAL CANCERS ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; adenocarcinoma ; case-control studies ; TOBACCO ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; case-control study ; VARIANT ; TOBACCO-SMOKE ; GSTM1 ; GSTT1 ; gastric cancer ; S-TRANSFERASE M1 ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; ENZYME ; GENETIC-POLYMORPHISM ; LOCUS ; FAMILY-HISTORY ; prospective ; ALLELE FREQUENCIES ; COMPOUND ; EPOXIDE HYDROLASE POLYMORPHISMS ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; HIGH-INCIDENCE AREA ; INCREASED RISK ; NEVER SMOKERS ; odds ratio ; T1 NULL GENOTYPES ; tobacco smoke ; UNIT
    Abstract: Metabolizing enzymes, which often display genetic polymorphisms, are involved in the activation of compounds present in tobacco smoke that may be relevant to gastric carcinogenesis. We report the results of a study looking at the association between risk of gastric adenocarcinoma and polymorphisms in genes CYP1A1, CYP1A2, EPHX1, and GSTT1. A nested case-control study was carried out within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, developed in 10 European countries. The study includes 243 newly diagnosed cases of histologically confirmed gastric adenocarcinoma and 946 controls matched by center, age, sex, and date of blood collection. Genotypes were determined in nuclear DNA from WBCs. We found an increased risk of gastric cancer for homozygotes for C (histidine) variant in Y113H of EPHX1 (odds ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.07) compared with subjects with TC/TT. There was also a significant increased risk for smokers carrying at least one variant allele A in Ex7+129C 〉 A (m4) of CYP1A1 and never smokers with null GSTT1 and allele A in the locus -3859G 〉 A of CYP1A2. Most of these genes are involved in the activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, suggesting a potential role of these compounds in gastric carcinogenesis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17164366
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; cohort study ; RISK ; SITE ; INFECTION ; ASSOCIATION ; antibodies ; WOMEN ; MEN ; COUNTRIES ; DIET ; STOMACH ; adenocarcinoma ; case-control studies ; CARDIA ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; case-control study ; INCREASE ; case control studies ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI INFECTION ; prospective ; Helicobacter pylori ; intake ; FOODS
    Abstract: It is considered that fruit and vegetable (F&V) protect against oesophagus and gastric cancer (GC). However, 2 recent meta-analyses suggest that the strength of association on GC seems to he weaker for vegetables than for fruit and weaker in cohort than in case-control studies. No evidence exists from cohort studies about adenocarcinoma of oesophagus (ACO). In 521,457 men and women participating in the EPIC cohort in 10 European countries, information of diet and lifestyle was collected at baseline. After an average of 6.5 years of follow-up, a total of 330 GC and 65 ACO, confirmed and classified by a panel of pathologists, was used for the analysis. We examined the relation between F&V intake and GC and ACO. A calibration study in a sub-sample was used to control diet measurement errors. In a sub-sample of cases and a random sample of controls, antibodies against Helicobacter pylori (Hp) were measured and interactions with F&V were examined in a nested case-control study. We observed no association with total vegetable intake or specific groups of vegetables and GC risk, except for the intestinal type, where a negative association is possible regarding total vegetable (calibrated HR 0.66; 95% CI 0.35-1.22 per 100 g increase) and onion and garlic intake (calibrated HR 0.70; 95% CI 0.38-1.29 per 10 g increase). No evidence of association between fresh fruit intake and GC risk was observed. We found a negative but non significant association between citrus fruit intake and the cardia site (calibrated HR 0.77; 95% CI 0.47-1.22 per 100 g increase) while no association was observed with the non-cardia site. Regarding ACO, we found a non significant negative association for vegetable intake and for citrus intake (calibrated HRs 0.72; 95% Cl 0.32-1.64 and 0.77; 95% CI 0.46-1.28 per 100 and 50 g increase, respectively). It seems that lip infection does not modify the effect of F&V intake. Our study supports a possible protective role of vegetable intake in the intestinal type of GC and the ACO. Citrus fruit consumption may have a role in the protection against cardia GC and ACO. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16380980
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Keywords: CELLS ; DISEASE ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK-FACTORS ; hepatocarcinogenesis ; prevention ; COUNTRIES ; PROJECT ; nutrition ; LIVER-CANCER
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Vegetable and/or fruit intakes in association with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk have been investigated in case-control studies conducted in specific European countries and cohort studies conducted in Asia, with inconclusive results. No multi-centre European cohort has investigated the indicated associations. METHODS: In 486 799 men/women from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition, we identified 201 HCC cases after 11 years median follow-up. We calculated adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for HCC incidence for sex-specific quintiles and per 100 g d(-1) increments of vegetable/fruit intakes. RESULTS: Higher vegetable intake was associated with a statistically significant, monotonic reduction of HCC risk: HR (100 g d(-1) increment): 0.83; 95% CI: 0.71-0.98. This association was consistent in sensitivity analyses with no apparent heterogeneity across strata of HCC risk factors. Fruit intake was not associated with HCC incidence: HR (100 g d(-1) increment): 1.01; 95% CI: 0.92-1.11. CONCLUSIONS: Vegetable, but not fruit, intake is associated with lower HCC risk with no evidence for heterogeneity of this association in strata of important HCC risk factors. Mechanistic studies should clarify pathways underlying this association. Given that HCC prognosis is poor and that vegetables are practically universally accessible, our results may be important, especially for those at high risk for the disease.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25742480
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; LUNG ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; incidence ; MORTALITY ; NEW-YORK ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; MEN ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; POPULATIONS ; DIET ; DIETARY ; NETHERLANDS ; case-control studies ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; EPIC study ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; SMOKERS ; VEGETABLES ; EUROPE ; FOOD ; RELATIVE RISK ; cancer,diet,epidemiology,fruits,vegetables,lung cancer,smoking ; FLAVONOIDS ; NONSMOKING WOMEN
    Abstract: Intake of fruits and vegetables is thought to protect against the development of lung cancer. However, some recent cohort and case-control studies have shown no protective effect. We have assessed the relation between fruit and vegetable intake and lung cancer incidence in the large prospective investigation on diet and cancer, the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We studied data from 478,021 individuals that took part in the EPIC study, who were recruited from 10 European countries and who completed a dietary questionnaire during 1992-1998. Follow-up was to December 1998 or 1999, but for some centres with active follow-up to June 2002. During follow-up, 1,074 participants were reported to have developed lung cancer, of whom 860 were eligible for our analysis. We used the Cox proportional hazard model to determine the effect of fruit and vegetable intake on the incidence of lung cancer. We paid particular attention to adjustment for smoking. Relative risk estimates were obtained using fruit and vegetable intake categorised by sex-specific, cohort-wide quintiles. After adjustment for age, smoking, height, weight and gender, there was a significant inverse association between fruit consumption and lung cancer risk: the hazard ratio for the highest quintile of consumption relative to the lowest being 0.60 (95% Confidence Interval 0.46-0.78), p for trend 0.0099. The association was strongest in the Northern Europe centres, and among current smokers at baseline, and was strengthened when the 293 lung cancers diagnosed in the first 2 years of follow-up were excluded from the analysis. There was no association between vegetable consumption or vegetable subtypes and lung cancer risk. The findings from this analysis can be regarded as re-enforcing recommendations with regard to enhanced fruit consumption for populations. However, the effect is likely to be small compared to smoking cessation. (C) 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14639614
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...