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  • 1
    Keywords: measurement ; tumor ; Germany ; LUNG ; CT ; IMAGES ; DISEASE ; NEW-YORK ; TUMORS ; PATIENT ; REDUCTION ; CONTRAST ; MRI ; CYCLE ; SEQUENCE ; NO ; DIFFERENCE ; REGION ; LOCALIZATION ; LENGTH ; COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY ; CURVES ; 3-DIMENSIONAL RECONSTRUCTION ; MOTION ; HEALTHY ; ORIENTATION ; LOCATION ; dynamic MRI ; ADULT ; ADULTS ; STRENGTH ; TRUEFISP ; HEALTHY-VOLUNTEERS ; PULMONARY-FUNCTION ; HEART-FAILURE ; EXPIRATION ; LUNG-VOLUMES ; breathing cycle ; diaphragmatic function
    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to assess diaphragmatic length and shortening during the breathing cycle in healthy volunteers and patients with a lung tumor using dynamic MRI (dMRI). In 15 healthy volunteers and 28 patients with a solitary lung tumor, diaphragmatic motion and length were measured during the breathing cycle using a trueFISP sequence (three images per second in the coronal and sagittal plane). Time-distance curves and maximal length reduction (= shortening) of the diaphragm were calculated. The influence of tumor localization on diaphragmatic shortening was examined. In healthy volunteers maximal diaphragmatic shortening was 30% in the coronal and 34% in the sagittal orientation, with no difference between both hemithoraces. Tumors of the upper and middle lung region did not affect diaphragmatic shortening. In contrast, tumors of the lower lung region changed shortening significantly (P〈0.05). In hemithoraces with a tumor in the lower region, shortening was 18% in the coronal and 19% in the sagittal plane. The ratio of diaphragmatic length change from inspiration to expiration changed significantly from healthy subjects (inspiration length &MGT; expiratory length, P〈0.05) to patients with a tumor in the lower lung region (inspiratory length = expiratory length). dMRI is a simple, non-invasive method to evaluate diaphragmatic motion and shortening in volunteers and patients during the breathing cycle. Tumors of the lower lung region have a significant influence on shortening of the diaphragm
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15127220
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  • 2
    Keywords: CT ; MICE ; MRI ; INFANTS ; YOUNG-CHILDREN ; RESOLUTION COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY ; CHEST RADIOGRAPH ; AIRWAY INFLAMMATION ; INHALED HYPERTONIC SALINE ; CLEARANCE INDEX
    Abstract: Rationale: Studies demonstrating early structural lung damage in infants and preschool children with cystic fibrosis (CF) suggest that noninvasive monitoring will be important to identify patients who may benefit from early therapeutic intervention. Previous studies demonstrated that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects structural and functional abnormalities in lungs from older patients with CF without radiation exposure. Objectives: To evaluate the potential of MRI to detect abnormal lung structure and perfusion in infants and preschool children with CF, and to monitor the response to therapy for pulmonary exacerbation. Methods: MRI studies were performed in 50 children with CF (age, 3.1 +/- 2.1 yr; range, 0-6 yr) in stable clinical condition (n = 40) or pulmonary exacerbation before and after antibiotic treatment (n = 10), and in 26 non-CF control subjects (age, 2.9 +/- 1.9 yr). T1-and T2-weighted sequences before and after intravenous contrast and first-pass perfusion imaging were acquired, and assessed on the basis of a dedicated morphofunctional score. Measurements and Main Results: MRI demonstrated bronchial wall thickening/bronchiectasis, mucus plugging, and perfusion deficits from the first year of life in most stable patients with CF (global score, 10.0 +/- 4.0), but not in non-CF control subjects (score, 0.0 +/- 0.0; P, 0.001). In patients with exacerbations, the global MRI score was increased to 18.0 +/- 2.0 (P, 0.001), and was significantly reduced to 12.0 +/- 3.0 (P, 0.05) after antibiotic therapy. Conclusions: MRI detected abnormalities in lung structure and perfusion, and response to therapy for exacerbations in infants and preschool children with CF. These results support the development of MRI for noninvasive monitoring and as an end point in interventional trials for early CF lung disease. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00760071).
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24564281
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  • 3
    Keywords: Germany ; LUNG ; PERFUSION ; THERAPY ; CT ; FOLLOW-UP ; imaging ; VENTILATION ; DISEASE ; EXPOSURE ; LONG-TERM ; POPULATION ; radiation ; prognosis ; FLOW ; MRI ; PROGRESSION ; MUTATION ; GAS ; MUTATIONS ; FREQUENT ; CHILDREN ; HYPERPOLARIZED HE-3 ; MR imaging ; review ; monitoring ; CHEST-X-RAY ; HUMAN LUNG ; cystic fibrosis ; CHILD ; proton MRI ; INTERVENTIONS ; MODALITY ; Follow up
    Abstract: Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is caused by mutations in the CFTR-gene and remains one of the most frequent lethal inherited diseases in the Caucasian population. Given the progress in CF therapy and the consecutive improvement in prognosis, monitoring of disease progression and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions with repeated imaging of the CF lung plays an increasingly important role. So far, the chest radiograph has been the most widely used imaging modality to monitor morphological changes in the CF lung. CT is the gold standard for assessment of morphological changes of airways and lung parenchyma. Considering the necessity of life-long repeated imaging studies, the cumulative radiation doses reached with CT is problematic for CF patients. A sensitive, non-invasive and quantitative technique without radiation exposure is warranted for monitoring of disease activity. In previous studies, MRI proved to be comparable to CT regarding the detection of morphological changes in the CF lung without using ionising radiation. Furthermore, MRI was shown to be superior to CT regarding assessment of functional changes of the lung. This review presents the typical morphological and functional MR imaging findings with respect to MR-based follow-up of CF lung disease. MRI offers a variety of techniques for morphological and functional imaging of the CF lung. Using this radiation free technique short- and long-term follow-up studies are possible enabling an individualised guidance of the therapy
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20432002
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  • 4
    Keywords: PERFUSION ; CT ; COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY ; REGIONAL VENTILATION
    Abstract: Purpose: To compare unenhanced lung ventilation-weighted (VW) and perfusion-weighted (QW) imaging based on Fourier decomposition (FD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with the clinical reference standard single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) in an animal experiment. Materials and Methods: The study was approved by the local animal care committee. Lung ventilation and perfusion was assessed in seven anesthetized pigs by using a 1.5-T MR imager and SPECT/CT. For time-resolved FD MR imaging, sets of lung images were acquired by using an untriggered two-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession sequence (repetition time, 1.9 msec; echo time, 0.8 msec; acquisition time per image, 118 msec; acquisition rate, 3.33 images per second; flip angle, 75 degrees; section thickness, 12 mm; matrix, 128 x 128). Breathing displacement was corrected with nonrigid image registration. Parenchymal signal intensity was analyzed pixelwise with FD to separate periodic changes of proton density induced by respiration and periodic changes of blood flow. Spectral lines representing respiratory and cardiac frequencies were integrated to calculate VW and QW images. Ventilation and perfusion SPECT was performed after inhalation of dispersed technetium 99m ((99m)Tc) and injection of (99m)Tc-labeled macroaggregated albumin. FD MR imaging and SPECT data were independently analyzed by two physicians in consensus. A regional statistical analysis of homogeneity and pathologic signal changes was performed. Results: Images acquired in healthy animals by using FD MR imaging and SPECT showed a homogeneous distribution of VW and QW imaging and pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, respectively. The gravitation-dependent signal distribution of ventilation and perfusion in all animals was similarly observed at FD MR imaging and SPECT. Incidental ventilation and perfusion defects were identically visualized by using both modalities. Conclusion: This animal experiment demonstrated qualitative agreement in the assessment of regional lung ventilation and perfusion between contrast media-free and radiation-free FD MR imaging and conventional SPECT/CT.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21586678
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  • 5
    Keywords: CT ; FLOW ; COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY ; PULMONARY-EMBOLISM ; proton MRI ; INITIAL-EXPERIENCE ; DUAL-ENERGY TECHNIQUE
    Abstract: PURPOSE: To assess the reproducibility of Fourier decomposition (FD) based ventilation- and perfusion-weighted lung MRI. METHODS: Sixteen healthy volunteers were examined on a 1.5 T whole-body MR-scanner with 4-6 sets of coronal slices over the chest volume with a non-contrast enhanced steady-state free precession sequence. The identical protocol was repeated after 24h. Reconstructed perfusion- and ventilation-weighted images were obtained through non-rigid registration and FD post-processing of images. Analysis of signal in segmented regions of interest was performed for both native and post-processed data. Two blinded chest radiologists rated image quality of perfusion- and ventilation-weighted images using a 3-point scale. RESULTS: Reproducibility of signal between the two time points was very good with intra-class correlation coefficients of 0.98, 0.94 and 0.86 for native, perfusion- and ventilation-weighted images, respectively. Perfusion- and ventilation-weighted images were of overall good quality with proportions of diagnostic images of 87-95% and 69-75%, respectively. Lung signal decreased from posterior to anterior slices with image quality of ventilation-weighted images in anterior areas rated worse than in posterior or perfusion-weighted images. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of image quality was good for perfusion and ventilation. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrates high reproducibility of ventilation- and perfusion-weighted FD lung MRI.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23295084
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  • 6
    Keywords: Germany ; LUNG ; PERFUSION ; THERAPY ; CT ; imaging ; PATIENT ; MRI ; SEQUENCE ; MAGNETIC-RESONANCE ; magnetic resonance imaging ; AGE ; STATISTICAL-ANALYSIS ; MORPHOLOGY ; PULMONARY PERFUSION ; BODY ; CHILDREN ; SEGMENTS ; FEASIBILITY ; BREATH-HOLD ; LUNG PERFUSION ; fibrosis ; WEIGHT ; IMPAIRMENT ; CYSTIC-FIBROSIS ; cystic fibrosis ; SMALL AIRWAYS ; DEFECT ; GRAPPA ; CIRCULATION ; lung morphology
    Abstract: This paper is a feasibility study of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lung perfusion in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) using contrast-enhanced 3D MRI. Correlation assessment of perfusion changes with structural abnormalities. Eleven CF patients (9 f, 2 m; median age 16 years) were examined at 1.5 T. Morphology: HASTE coronal, transversal (TR/TE/alpha/ST: 600 ms/28 ms/180 degrees/6 mm), breath-hold 18 s. Perfusion: Time-resolved 3D GRE pulse sequence (FLASH, TE/TR/alpha: 0.8/1.9 ms/40 degrees), parallel imaging (GRAPPA, PAT 2). Twenty-five data sets were acquired after intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight of gadodiamide, 3-5 ml/s. A total of 198 lung segments were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus and scored for morphological and perfusion changes. Statistical analysis was performed by Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test. Results showed that perfusion defects were observed in all patients and present in 80% of upper, and 39% of lower lobes. Normal lung parenchyma showed homogeneous perfusion (86%, P 〈 0.0001). Severe morphological changes led to perfusion defects (97%, P 〈 0.0001). Segments with moderate morphological changes showed normal (53%) or impaired perfusion (47%). In conclusion, pulmonary perfusion is easy to judge in segments with normal parenchyma or severe changes. In moderately damaged segments, MRI of lung perfusion may help to better assess actual functional impairment. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRI of lung perfusion has the potential for early vascular functional assessment and therapy control in CF patients
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16673092
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  • 7
    Keywords: Germany ; LUNG ; chest ; CT ; DIAGNOSIS ; FOLLOW-UP ; imaging ; DISEASE ; EXPOSURE ; RESOLUTION ; radiation ; PATIENT ; IMPACT ; prognosis ; MRI ; MAGNETIC-RESONANCE ; magnetic resonance imaging ; MORPHOLOGY ; COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY ; FUNCTION TESTS ; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ; CHILDREN ; HRCT ; fibrosis ; ADULTS ; LIFE ; CYSTIC-FIBROSIS ; TESTS ; technique ; function ; cystic fibrosis ; RADIATION EXPOSURE ; lungs ; improvement of ; gold ; mucoviscidosis
    Abstract: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease with major impact on the lungs. Pulmonary manifestation is crucial for the prognosis and life expectancy of patients. Imaging modalities and lung function tests reflect the pulmonary status in these patients. The standard imaging modality for diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary changes is chest x-ray. The gold standard for the detection of parenchymal lung changes remains high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), but this is not used routinely for CF-patients due to radiation exposure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used to be of no importance in monitoring cystic fibrosis lung disease, as shown in studies from the 1980s and early 1990s. The continuing improvement of MRI techniques, however, has allowed for an adequate application of this non-radiation method in diagnosing the major pulmonary findings in CF, in addition to the assessment of lung function
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16437239
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  • 8
    Keywords: CT ; TRIAL ; SPIRAL COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY ; RECRUITMENT
    Abstract: PURPOSE: Low-dose multislice-CT (MSCT) detects many early-stage lung cancers with good prognosis, but whether it decreases lung cancer mortality and at which costs is yet insufficiently explored. Scope of the present study is to examine within a common European effort whether MSCT screening is capable to reduce the lung cancer mortality by at least 20 % and at which amount of undesired side effects this could be achieved. METHODS: Overall 4,052 heavy smoking men and women were recruited by a population-based approach and randomized into a screening arm with five annual MSCT screens and an initial quit-smoking counseling, and a control arm with initial quit-smoking counseling and five annual questionnaire inquiries. RESULTS: In the first screening round, 2,029 participants received a MSCT providing 1,488 negative and 540 suspicious screens with early recalls (early recall rate 26.6 %) leading to 31 biopsies (biopsy rate 1.5 %) and 22 confirmed lung cancers (detection rate 1.1 %). Among the lung cancers, 15 were adenocarcinomas, 3 squamous cell carcinomas, one small-cell lung cancer, and 3 others, whereby 18 were in clinical stage I, one in stage II, and 3 in stage III. One interval cancer occurred. CONCLUSIONS: The indicated performance indicators fit into the range observed in comparable trials. The study continues finalizing the second screening round and for the first participants even the last screening round. The unresolved issue of the precise amount of side effects and the high early recall rate precludes currently the recommendation of MSCT as screening tool for lung cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22526165
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  • 9
    Keywords: Germany ; LUNG ; PERFUSION ; CT ; DIAGNOSIS ; IMAGES ; VISUALIZATION ; DISEASE ; DIFFERENTIATION ; RESOLUTION ; TIME ; PATIENT ; MR ; MRI ; MAGNETIC-RESONANCE ; arteries ; EMBOLISM ; MR-ANGIOGRAPHY ; magnetic resonance angiography ; pathology ; ANGIOGRAPHY ; HYPERTENSION ; contrast media ; MANAGEMENT ; PULMONARY ; PH ; ARTERIAL-HYPERTENSION ; ARTERIAL ; LEVEL ; IMAGE QUALITY ; CONSENSUS ; PULMONARY-ARTERIES ; TEMPORAL RESOLUTION ; HIGH-SPATIAL-RESOLUTION ; CTEPH ; IPAH
    Abstract: Differentiation between different forms of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is essential for correct disease management. The goal of this study was to elucidate the clinical impact of high spatial resolution MR angiography (SR-MRA) and time-resolved MRA (TR-MRA) to differentiate between patients with chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH) and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Ten PH patients and five volunteers were examined. Twenty TR-MRA data sets (TA 1.5 s) and SR-MRA (TA 23 s) were acquired. TR-MRA data sets were subtracted as angiography and perfusion images. Evaluation comprised analysis of vascular pathologies on a segmental basis, detection of perfusion defects, and bronchial arteries by two readers in consensus. Technical evaluation comprised evaluation of image quality, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements, and contrast-media passage time. Visualization of the pulmonary arteries was possible down to a subsegmental (SR-MRA) and to a segmental (TR-MRA) level. SR-MRA outperformed TR-MRA in direct visualization of intravascular changes. Patients with IPAH predominantly showed tortuous pulmonary arteries while in CTEPH wall irregularities and abnormal proximal-to-distal tapering was found. Perfusion images showed a diffuse pattern in IPAH and focal defects in CTEPH. TR-MRA and SR-MRA resulted in the same final diagnosis. Both MRA techniques allowed for differentiation between IPAH and CTEPH. Therefore, TR-MRA can be used in the clinical setting, especially in dyspneic patients
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16041529
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  • 10
    Keywords: Germany ; LUNG ; chest ; CT ; FOLLOW-UP ; imaging ; INFORMATION ; SYSTEM ; TOOL ; DEATH ; POPULATION ; computed tomography ; RESOLUTION ; PATIENT ; IMPACT ; CONTRAST ; MRI ; MAGNETIC-RESONANCE ; magnetic resonance imaging ; COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY ; CHILDREN ; LUNG PERFUSION ; ADULTS ; PHASE ; cystic fibrosis
    Abstract: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent inherited disorder leading to premature death in the Caucasian population. As life expectancy is limited by pulmonary complications, repeated imaging [chest X-ray, multislice high-resolution computed tomography (MS-HRCT)] is required in the follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung parenchyma is a promising new diagnostic tool. Its value for imaging lung changes caused by CF compared with CT is demonstrated. MRI performs well when compared with CT, which serves as the gold standard. Its lack in spatial resolution is obvious, but advantages in contrast and functional assessment compensate for this limitation. Thus, MRI is a reasonable alternative for imaging the CF lung and should be introduced as a radiation-free modality for follow-up studies in CF patients. For further evaluation of the impact of MRI, systematic studies comparing MRI and conventional imaging modalities are necessary. Furthermore, the value of the additional functional MRI (fMRI) information has to be studied, and a scoring system for the morphological and functional aspect of MRI has to be established
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16941092
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