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  • Chemical Engineering  (330)
  • Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy  (243)
  • Animals  (201)
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-06-16
    Description: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of conditions characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and restricted and repetitive behaviours. ASD is a highly heritable disorder involving various genetic determinants. Shank2 (also known as ProSAP1) is a multi-domain scaffolding protein and signalling adaptor enriched at excitatory neuronal synapses, and mutations in the human SHANK2 gene have recently been associated with ASD and intellectual disability. Although ASD-associated genes are being increasingly identified and studied using various approaches, including mouse genetics, further efforts are required to delineate important causal mechanisms with the potential for therapeutic application. Here we show that Shank2-mutant (Shank2(-/-)) mice carrying a mutation identical to the ASD-associated microdeletion in the human SHANK2 gene exhibit ASD-like behaviours including reduced social interaction, reduced social communication by ultrasonic vocalizations, and repetitive jumping. These mice show a marked decrease in NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) glutamate receptor (NMDAR) function. Direct stimulation of NMDARs with D-cycloserine, a partial agonist of NMDARs, normalizes NMDAR function and improves social interaction in Shank2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, treatment of Shank2(-/-) mice with a positive allosteric modulator of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), which enhances NMDAR function via mGluR5 activation, also normalizes NMDAR function and markedly enhances social interaction. These results suggest that reduced NMDAR function may contribute to the development of ASD-like phenotypes in Shank2(-/-) mice, and mGluR modulation of NMDARs offers a potential strategy to treat ASD.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Won, Hyejung -- Lee, Hye-Ryeon -- Gee, Heon Yung -- Mah, Won -- Kim, Jae-Ick -- Lee, Jiseok -- Ha, Seungmin -- Chung, Changuk -- Jung, Eun Suk -- Cho, Yi Sul -- Park, Sae-Geun -- Lee, Jung-Soo -- Lee, Kyungmin -- Kim, Daesoo -- Bae, Yong Chul -- Kaang, Bong-Kiun -- Lee, Min Goo -- Kim, Eunjoon -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jun 13;486(7402):261-5. doi: 10.1038/nature11208.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biological Sciences, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701, Korea.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22699620" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/*genetics ; Animals ; Antimetabolites/pharmacology ; *Autistic Disorder/genetics/metabolism ; Behavior, Animal/*drug effects/physiology ; Benzamides/*pharmacology ; Cycloserine/*pharmacology ; Disease Models, Animal ; Female ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Nerve Tissue Proteins/*genetics ; Pyrazoles/*pharmacology ; Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate/*agonists/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-01-19
    Description: Many procedures in modern clinical medicine rely on the use of electronic implants in treating conditions that range from acute coronary events to traumatic injury. However, standard permanent electronic hardware acts as a nidus for infection: bacteria form biofilms along percutaneous wires, or seed haematogenously, with the potential to migrate within the body and to provoke immune-mediated pathological tissue reactions. The associated surgical retrieval procedures, meanwhile, subject patients to the distress associated with re-operation and expose them to additional complications. Here, we report materials, device architectures, integration strategies, and in vivo demonstrations in rats of implantable, multifunctional silicon sensors for the brain, for which all of the constituent materials naturally resorb via hydrolysis and/or metabolic action, eliminating the need for extraction. Continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure and temperature illustrates functionality essential to the treatment of traumatic brain injury; the measurement performance of our resorbable devices compares favourably with that of non-resorbable clinical standards. In our experiments, insulated percutaneous wires connect to an externally mounted, miniaturized wireless potentiostat for data transmission. In a separate set-up, we connect a sensor to an implanted (but only partially resorbable) data-communication system, proving the principle that there is no need for any percutaneous wiring. The devices can be adapted to sense fluid flow, motion, pH or thermal characteristics, in formats that are compatible with the body's abdomen and extremities, as well as the deep brain, suggesting that the sensors might meet many needs in clinical medicine.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Seung-Kyun -- Murphy, Rory K J -- Hwang, Suk-Won -- Lee, Seung Min -- Harburg, Daniel V -- Krueger, Neil A -- Shin, Jiho -- Gamble, Paul -- Cheng, Huanyu -- Yu, Sooyoun -- Liu, Zhuangjian -- McCall, Jordan G -- Stephen, Manu -- Ying, Hanze -- Kim, Jeonghyun -- Park, Gayoung -- Webb, R Chad -- Lee, Chi Hwan -- Chung, Sangjin -- Wie, Dae Seung -- Gujar, Amit D -- Vemulapalli, Bharat -- Kim, Albert H -- Lee, Kyung-Mi -- Cheng, Jianjun -- Huang, Younggang -- Lee, Sang Hoon -- Braun, Paul V -- Ray, Wilson Z -- Rogers, John A -- F31MH101956/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Feb 4;530(7588):71-6. doi: 10.1038/nature16492. Epub 2016 Jan 18.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; Department of Neurological Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, Republic of Korea. ; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA. ; Institute of High Performance Computing, Singapore 138632, Singapore. ; Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, South Korea. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-713, South Korea. ; Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, The Center for Implantable Devices, Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA. ; School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA. ; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Skin Disease Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA. ; Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-703, South Korea. ; Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26779949" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Absorbable Implants/adverse effects ; Administration, Cutaneous ; Animals ; Body Temperature ; Brain/*metabolism/surgery ; Electronics/*instrumentation ; Equipment Design ; Hydrolysis ; Male ; Monitoring, Physiologic/adverse effects/*instrumentation ; Organ Specificity ; Pressure ; *Prostheses and Implants/adverse effects ; Rats ; Rats, Inbred Lew ; *Silicon ; Telemetry/instrumentation ; Wireless Technology/instrumentation
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    ISSN: 0935-6304
    Keywords: Capillary GC ; Enantiomer resolution ; Chiral stationary phase ; Derivated cyclodextrins ; Chemistry ; Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: Three new β-cyclodextrin derivatives, heptakis(6-O-isopropyldi-methylsilyl-2,3-di-O-ethyl)-β-cyclodextrin, heptakis(6-O-thexyldi-methylsilyl-2,3-di-O-ethyl)-β-cyclodextrin, and heptakis(6-O-cy-clohexyldimethyl-2,3-di-O-ethyl)-β-cyclodextrin (IPDE-β-CD, TXDE-β-CD, and CHDE-β-CD), were synthesized and the enan-tioselectivities of these three CD derivatives and heptakis(6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-di-O-ethyl)-β-cyclodextrin (TBDE-β-CD) were compared for GC separation of a range of chiral test com-pounds. In particular TXDE-β-CD showed much higher enentio-selectivity than TBDE-β-CD. Enentioselectivities of IPDE-β-CD and CHDE-β-CD are somewhat lower than that of TXDE-β-CD and CHDE-β-Cd are somewhat lower than that of TXDE-β-CD. These observations are indicative of significant effects of subtle changes in the structure of the 6-O-substituent on the enantioselec-tivity of the β-CD derivatives. The difference in enantioselectivities of the 6-O-substituted CD derivatives were explained in terms of relative contributions of the effects of hydrophobicity and steric hindrance of the substituent to the inclusion process. CHDE-β-CD showed the lowest enantioselectivity among the threederivatives. It is likely that the unfavorable steric hindrance of the bulky cyclo-hexyl group plays a greater role than the favorable hydrophobicity effect of the cyclohexyl group in the inclusion process in CHDE-β-CD. IPDE-β-CD showed lower selectivity than TXDE-β-CD and TBDE-β-CD. In the case of these CD derivatives having acyclic substituents the relative hydrophobicity of the substituent seems to be a dominant factor affecting the inclusion process. Isopropyl groups factor affecting the inclusion process. Isopropyl groups are less hydrophobic than thexyl and tert-butyl groups.
    Additional Material: 4 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Hoboken, NJ : Wiley-Blackwell
    AIChE Journal 31 (1985), S. 667-675 
    ISSN: 0001-1541
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Chemical Engineering
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: A scheme of on-line optimizing control is presented for a nonadiabatic fixed bed reactor which experiences a highly exothermic reaction. The control scheme has been devised to perform adaptive control of bed temperature and on-line steady state optimization simultaneously.Experiments were conducted with a pilot scale fixed bed reactor where partial oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride occurs. The reactor system was interfaced with a microcomputer for real-time control and optimization. With an objective function consisting of a net profit by producing maleic anhydride plus a penalty term on high bed temperature, it was clearly shown that the reaction conditions were driven to the expected optimum region.
    Additional Material: 14 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    ISSN: 0032-3888
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Chemical Engineering
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Physics
    Notes: Experimental results on reactions forming polyurethanes and polyurethane-polyester Interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) are discussed with particular interest in rheological and kinetic changes before the gel point. In the IPN formation, viscosity rise is affected by the amount of styrene and polyester in the reaction system. Plots of reduced viscosity vs. conversion do not fall into a single curve. The results may be explained by the concept of having intra-molecular reaction or ring formation. The existence of hydroxyl group at the end of polyester molecule causes the graft reaction between the polyurethane phase and the polyester phase, which may speed up the viscosity rise of the reactive system. A simple method which based on rheological measurements only is proposed. This method of plotting reduced viscosity vs. reduced reaction time provides similar results as in the plots of reduced viscosity vs. conversion.
    Additional Material: 14 Ill.
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  • 6
    ISSN: 0032-3888
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Chemical Engineering
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Physics
    Notes: The morphology and dynamic mechanical properties of blends of poly(ether imide) (PEI) and nylon 66 over the full composition range have been invesigated. Torque changes during mixing were also measured. Lowertorque values than those calculated by the log-additivity rule were ontained, resulting from the slip at the interface due to low interaction between the componeents. The particle size of the dispersed phase and morphology of the blends were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The composition of each phase was calculated. The blends of PEI and nylon 66 showed phase-seoarated structures with small spherical domains of 0.3 ∼ 0.7 μm. The glass transition temperatures (Tgg) of the blends were shifted inward, compared with those of the homopolymers, which implied that the blends were partially imiscible over a range of compositions. Tg1, corresponding to nylon 66-rich phase. This indicated that the fraction of PEI mixed into nylon 66-rich phase increased with decreasing PEI content and that nylon 66 was rerely mixed into the PEI-rich phase. The effect of composition of the secondary relaxations was examined. Both Tβ, corresponding to the motion of amide groups in nylon 66. and Tγ′, corresponding to that of either groups in PEI, were shifted to higher temperature, probably because of the formation of intermolecular interactions between the components.
    Additional Material: 4 Ill.
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  • 7
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Hoboken, NJ : Wiley-Blackwell
    AIChE Journal 39 (1993), S. 1093-1096 
    ISSN: 0001-1541
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Chemical Engineering
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Additional Material: 6 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Stamford, Conn. [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Polymer Engineering and Science 34 (1994), S. 742-749 
    ISSN: 0032-3888
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Chemical Engineering
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Physics
    Notes: A new graphical estimation technique is proposed for the determination of the kinetic parameters describing an autocatalytic reaction. A differential scanning calorimeter was used to monitor the reaction kinetics of an epoxy-based vinyl ester resin. The method utilizes information from a zero initial reaction rate, conversation at vitrification, the ratio of reaction rate constants under different isothermal conditions, and characteristics of the phenomenological kinetic model with assumptions being made about the overall reaction order. By fitting data to the integrated reaction rate equation with adjustments for the isothermal conditions, the kinetic parameters are estimated without using a linear or nonlinear regression method. Different kinetic parameters can be estimated from data before and after the gel point which was obtained from the relationship between the glass transition temperature and the degree of cure.
    Additional Material: 13 Ill.
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  • 9
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Stamford, Conn. [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Polymer Engineering and Science 35 (1995), S. 1629-1635 
    ISSN: 0032-3888
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Chemical Engineering
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Physics
    Notes: Copoly(ehtylene terephthalate/imide)s (PETI) were prepared by melt polycodensation of bis(2-hydroxyethyl)terephthalate (BHET) and imide containing comonomer, 4,4′-bis[(4-carbo-2-hydroxyethoxy)phthalimido]diphenylmethane (BHEI) with Sb2O3 as catalyst at 280°C under vacuum (∼ 1 mm Hg). The change of Tm with an increase of the BHEI repeat unit in the PETI copolymer was analyzed by the Flory equation. On isothermal crystallization, a longer induction time and a lower activation energy than for the PET homopolymer were observed with an increasing amount of BHEI repeat unit. The Avrami exponent, n, increased from 1.5 to 2.3 as the content of BHEI or crystallization temperature was increased. The Avrami rate constant K decreased with the increase of the BHEL unit. On nonisothermal crystallization, the Ozawa equation and Lawton plot were used to investigate the effect of BHEI units on the crystallization kinetics of PETI copolymers. From the change of the cooling crystallization function and the result of the Lawton plot, it was found that the BHEI unit effectively decreases the rate of crystallization.
    Additional Material: 10 Ill.
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  • 10
    ISSN: 0935-6304
    Keywords: Capillary GC ; Enantiomer resolution ; Chiral stationary phases ; Derivatized cyclodextrins ; Chemistry ; Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: Three new chiral selectors, 6-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-diethyl-a-cyclodextrin, 6-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-diethyl- and dipropyl-β-cyclodextrin (TBDE-α-CD, TBDE-β-CD, TBDP-β-CD) were synthesized and tested as chiral stationary phases in capillary gas chromatography. TBDE-β-CD in particular showed a high enan-tioselectivity for test chiral compounds due to good solubility in a polar polysiloxane (OV-1701). Enantioselectivity obtained with TBDE-β-CD was compared with that of 6-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin (TBDM-β-CD). Better enantiose-lectivity was obtained with TBDE-P-CD than with TBDM-β-CD for the test chiral compounds studied. This is probably due to greater effect of the increased hydrophobicity of TBDE-β-CD which favors inclusion of the analytes than the effect of increased steric hindrance. With TBDP-β-CD the less polar lactones are well separated due most likely to increased hydrophobicity of the propyl groups while the more polar are not well resolved. For TBDP-β-CD it is likely that the unfavorable steric hindrance is predominant over the favorable hydrophobicity of the propyl groups, thus hindering the formation of inclusion complexes of the alcohols with TBDP-β-CD. TBDE-α-CD was also a valuable chiral selector for the separation of small chiral molecules such as simple secondary alcohols and nitro-substituted alcohols.
    Additional Material: 3 Ill.
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