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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Chichester : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Physical Organic Chemistry 11 (1998), S. 536-539 
    ISSN: 0894-3230
    Keywords: enzyme design ; enzyme mechanism ; genetic engineering ; Chemistry ; Theoretical, Physical and Computational Chemistry
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: Aspartate aminotransferase (AATase) and aminocyclopropane carboxylate synthase (ACC synthase) are pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes whose common junction of mechanistic divergence is after the formation of a Cα carbanion from the amino acid substrate bound to PLP as a Schiff base (aldimine). AATase catalyzes the reversible interconversion of α-amino acids and α-keto acids, while ACC synthase effects the irreversible decomposition of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) and 5′-methylthioadenosine (MTA). ACC is subsequently converted to ethylene, the plant ripening and senescence hormone, by ACC oxidase, the next enzyme in the pathway. AATase and ACC synthase exhibit many similar phenomenological characteristics that result from different detailed mechanistic origins. The kcat/KM versus pH profiles for both enzymes are similar (AATase, acidic pKa = 6.9, basic pKa = 9.6; ACC synthase, acidic pKa = 7.5, basic pKa = 8.9); however the acidic pKa of AATase reflects the ionization of an enzyme proton from the internal Schiff base, and the basic one is that of the α-amino group of the substrate, while the opposite situation obtains for ACC synthase, i.e. the apparent pKa of 7.4 is due to the α-amino group of SAM, whereas that of 9 reflects the Schiff base pKa. The mechanistic imperative underlying this reversal is dictated by the reaction mechanism and the low pKa of the α-amino group of SAM. The low pKa of SAM requires that the enzyme pKa be moved upward in order to have sufficient quantities of the reacting species at neutral pH. It is shown by viscosity variation experiments with wild-type and active site mutant controls of both enzymes that the reaction of SAM with ACC synthase is 100% diffusion controlled (kcat/KM = 1.2 × 106 l mol-1 s-1) while the corresponding reaction for the combination of L-aspartate with AATase is insensitive to viscosity, and is therefore chemically not diffusion limited. Tyr225 (AATase) or Tyr233 (ACC synthase) forms a hydrogen bond with the PLP in both enzymes, but that formed with the former enzyme is stronger and accounts for the lower pKa of the Schiff base. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Additional Material: 7 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    New York, NY [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Process Safety Progress 14 (1995), S. 257-265 
    ISSN: 1066-8527
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Chemical Engineering
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Dust layers on the bottom of mine tunnels, on factory floors, or on the floors of grain elevator passages are the most frequent cause of highly destructive dust explosions. Typically, such layered dust explosions involve a high velocity, accelerating, turbulent flame which is fed by the dust layer and results in high destructive static and dynamic pressures. In some cases transition to detonation has been observed, and such explosions are the most destructive. Scientific studies of such layered dust explosions, conducted at the University of Michigan, are discussed.
    Additional Material: 9 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    New York, NY [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Applied Polymer Science 46 (1992), S. 1375-1379 
    ISSN: 0021-8995
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Polymer and Materials Science
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Physics
    Notes: A dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer (DMTA) was used to monitor changes of dynamic mechanical properties during thermal degradation of two types of epoxy/silica composites, both of which are used as electrical insulation in power apparatus. It was found that the peak value of the dynamic loss factor (tan δ), glass transition temperature (Tg), and dynamic storage modulus (E′) above Tg changed considerably with increasing thermal degradation, while E′ at the glassy state only underwent a moderate change with increased thermal degradation. It is concluded that the DMTA technique is very sensitive to the structural changes in the investigated epoxy composites due to the thermal degradation. It is also confirmed by DMTA tests that further cross-linking and loss of dangling chains are occurring slowly during the stage prior to the onset of the severe degradation. © 1992 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Additional Material: 9 Ill.
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  • 4
    ISSN: 0377-0486
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The Raman spectra of gaseous, liquid and solid 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-methoxypropane, (CF3)2 CHOCH3, and the corresponding methoxy-d3 isotope, (CF3)2 CHOCD3, together with the infrared spectra of the gases and solids, have been recorded from 3500 to 30 cm-1. A comparison of the vibrational spectra obtained for the fluid phases with those obtained for the amorphous and annealed solids indicates the predominance of a single conformer at ambient temperature in the fluid phases with the same conformer present in the solid state. Based on the lack of depolarized Raman lines in the fluid phases, and a predominance of nondescript infrared band contours, it is concluded that the stable conformer is the gauche form which has the methoxy group rotated approximately 60° from eclipsing the secondary carbon—hydrogen bond. Thirty-eight of the 39 normal modes have been assigned based on group frequencies, isotopic shifts, depolarization values and infrared band contours. There appears to be coupling of the CF3 and methoxy torsional modes. Utilizing a coupled-top barrier calculation, the barrier to internal rotation of the perfluoromethyl groups is estimated to be 2858 ± 100 cm-1 (8.2 ± 0.3 kcal mol-1) based on the torsional frequencies of 107 and 64 cm-1 observed in the solid phase. Several of the fundamentals appear as doublets in the spectra of the solids, which indicates that there are at least two molecules per primitive cell. These results are compared with similar data for some corresponding molecules.
    Additional Material: 6 Ill.
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  • 5
    ISSN: 0377-0486
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Notes: The Raman spectrum of gaseous nitrocyclopropane, c—C3H5NO2 has been recorded from 3500 to 30 cm-1. The interesting internal NO2 torsion was observed at 85±2cm-1 from which a barrier to internal rotation in the vapor state of 1680±70 cm-1 (4.8±0.2 kcal mol-1) was calculated. It is shown that this torsional frequency is consistent with the relative intensities of the vibrational excited states in the microwave spectrum. This barrier value is compared to those for several other NO2 substituted hydrocarbons as well as for the corresponding isoelectronic BF2 substituted molecules. The high barrier value supports the structural arguments that there is significant pseudo-conjugation between the cyclopropane ring orbitals and the substituent NO2 group. A revised vibrational assignment is presented which is compared to the one previously given for the isoelectronic molecule, c-C3H5BF2, as well as for c-C3H5BCI2.
    Additional Material: 2 Ill.
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  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Stamford, Conn. [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Polymer Engineering and Science 31 (1991), S. 1157-1163 
    ISSN: 0032-3888
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Chemical Engineering
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Physics
    Notes: A knowledge of flow behavior is important in the study of laminar flow in twin-screw extrusion processes to predict the velocity distribution and to understand the mixing process. The flow of a power law fluid in self-wiping twin-screw extruders is examined using a two-dimensional finite element analysis of a mid-channel section of intermeshing screws. Theory is compared with experiment using food biopolymer and plastic materials. Comparisons showing overprediction of throughputs, but similarities in behavior, suggest that this model could provide an upper limit for melt conveying. For most of the throughput range examined, pumping of intermeshing self-wiping screws appears to be almost independent of the power law flow index of the melt extruded, but the value of the flow index determines the degree of influence intermeshing has on the overall pressure gradient generated in the extruder.
    Additional Material: 6 Ill.
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-06-29
    Description: Chiral amines are widely used as catalysts in asymmetric synthesis to activate carbonyl groups for α-functionalization. Carbonyl catalysis reverses that strategy by using a carbonyl group to activate a primary amine. Inspired by biological carbonyl catalysis, which is exemplified by reactions of pyridoxal-dependent enzymes, we developed an N-quaternized pyridoxal catalyst for the asymmetric Mannich reaction of glycinate with aryl N -diphenylphosphinyl imines. The catalyst exhibits high activity and stereoselectivity, likely enabled by enzyme-like cooperative bifunctional activation of the substrates. Our work demonstrates the catalytic utility of the pyridoxal moiety in asymmetric catalysis.
    Keywords: Chemistry
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: The human lens is comprised largely of crystallin proteins assembled into a highly ordered, interactive macro-structure essential for lens transparency and refractive index. Any disruption of intra- or inter-protein interactions will alter this delicate structure, exposing hydrophobic surfaces, with consequent protein aggregation and cataract formation. Cataracts are the most common cause of blindness worldwide, affecting tens of millions of people, and currently the only treatment is surgical removal of cataractous lenses. The precise mechanisms by which lens proteins both prevent aggregation and maintain lens transparency are largely unknown. Lanosterol is an amphipathic molecule enriched in the lens. It is synthesized by lanosterol synthase (LSS) in a key cyclization reaction of a cholesterol synthesis pathway. Here we identify two distinct homozygous LSS missense mutations (W581R and G588S) in two families with extensive congenital cataracts. Both of these mutations affect highly conserved amino acid residues and impair key catalytic functions of LSS. Engineered expression of wild-type, but not mutant, LSS prevents intracellular protein aggregation of various cataract-causing mutant crystallins. Treatment by lanosterol, but not cholesterol, significantly decreased preformed protein aggregates both in vitro and in cell-transfection experiments. We further show that lanosterol treatment could reduce cataract severity and increase transparency in dissected rabbit cataractous lenses in vitro and cataract severity in vivo in dogs. Our study identifies lanosterol as a key molecule in the prevention of lens protein aggregation and points to a novel strategy for cataract prevention and treatment.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhao, Ling -- Chen, Xiang-Jun -- Zhu, Jie -- Xi, Yi-Bo -- Yang, Xu -- Hu, Li-Dan -- Ouyang, Hong -- Patel, Sherrina H -- Jin, Xin -- Lin, Danni -- Wu, Frances -- Flagg, Ken -- Cai, Huimin -- Li, Gen -- Cao, Guiqun -- Lin, Ying -- Chen, Daniel -- Wen, Cindy -- Chung, Christopher -- Wang, Yandong -- Qiu, Austin -- Yeh, Emily -- Wang, Wenqiu -- Hu, Xun -- Grob, Seanna -- Abagyan, Ruben -- Su, Zhiguang -- Tjondro, Harry Christianto -- Zhao, Xi-Juan -- Luo, Hongrong -- Hou, Rui -- Perry, J Jefferson P -- Gao, Weiwei -- Kozak, Igor -- Granet, David -- Li, Yingrui -- Sun, Xiaodong -- Wang, Jun -- Zhang, Liangfang -- Liu, Yizhi -- Yan, Yong-Bin -- Zhang, Kang -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 30;523(7562):607-11. doi: 10.1038/nature14650. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [3] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Membrane Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. ; 1] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [2] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China. ; State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] CapitalBio Genomics Co., Ltd., Dongguan 523808, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 20080, China. ; Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California 92521, USA. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ; Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 20080, China. ; Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [3] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [4] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [5] Veterans Administration Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200341" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Amyloid/chemistry/drug effects/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Cataract/congenital/*drug therapy/genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Cell Line ; Child ; Crystallins/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Dogs ; Female ; Humans ; Lanosterol/administration & dosage/*pharmacology/*therapeutic use ; Lens, Crystalline/drug effects/metabolism/pathology ; Male ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutant Proteins/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Pedigree ; Protein Aggregates/*drug effects ; Protein Aggregation, Pathological/*drug therapy/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2011-05-21
    Description: The transmission of information from DNA to RNA is a critical process. We compared RNA sequences from human B cells of 27 individuals to the corresponding DNA sequences from the same individuals and uncovered more than 10,000 exonic sites where the RNA sequences do not match that of the DNA. All 12 possible categories of discordances were observed. These differences were nonrandom as many sites were found in multiple individuals and in different cell types, including primary skin cells and brain tissues. Using mass spectrometry, we detected peptides that are translated from the discordant RNA sequences and thus do not correspond exactly to the DNA sequences. These widespread RNA-DNA differences in the human transcriptome provide a yet unexplored aspect of genome variation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3204392/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3204392/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Mingyao -- Wang, Isabel X -- Li, Yun -- Bruzel, Alan -- Richards, Allison L -- Toung, Jonathan M -- Cheung, Vivian G -- R01 HG005854/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG005854-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jul 1;333(6038):53-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1207018. Epub 2011 May 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21596952" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Aged ; Amino Acid Sequence ; B-Lymphocytes ; Base Sequence ; Cell Line ; Cerebral Cortex/cytology ; DNA/chemistry/*genetics ; Exons ; Expressed Sequence Tags ; Fibroblasts ; Gene Expression Profiling ; *Genetic Variation ; *Genome, Human ; Genotype ; Humans ; Mass Spectrometry ; Middle Aged ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Protein Biosynthesis ; Proteins/chemistry ; Proteome/chemistry ; RNA, Messenger/chemistry/*genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Sequence Analysis, RNA ; Skin/cytology ; Untranslated Regions
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2014-03-05
    Description: Recognition of modified histones by 'reader' proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of chromatin. H3K36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) is deposited onto the nucleosomes in the transcribed regions after RNA polymerase II elongation. In yeast, this mark in turn recruits epigenetic regulators to reset the chromatin to a relatively repressive state, thus suppressing cryptic transcription. However, much less is known about the role of H3K36me3 in transcription regulation in mammals. This is further complicated by the transcription-coupled incorporation of the histone variant H3.3 in gene bodies. Here we show that the candidate tumour suppressor ZMYND11 specifically recognizes H3K36me3 on H3.3 (H3.3K36me3) and regulates RNA polymerase II elongation. Structural studies show that in addition to the trimethyl-lysine binding by an aromatic cage within the PWWP domain, the H3.3-dependent recognition is mediated by the encapsulation of the H3.3-specific 'Ser 31' residue in a composite pocket formed by the tandem bromo-PWWP domains of ZMYND11. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing shows a genome-wide co-localization of ZMYND11 with H3K36me3 and H3.3 in gene bodies, and its occupancy requires the pre-deposition of H3.3K36me3. Although ZMYND11 is associated with highly expressed genes, it functions as an unconventional transcription co-repressor by modulating RNA polymerase II at the elongation stage. ZMYND11 is critical for the repression of a transcriptional program that is essential for tumour cell growth; low expression levels of ZMYND11 in breast cancer patients correlate with worse prognosis. Consistently, overexpression of ZMYND11 suppresses cancer cell growth in vitro and tumour formation in mice. Together, this study identifies ZMYND11 as an H3.3-specific reader of H3K36me3 that links the histone-variant-mediated transcription elongation control to tumour suppression.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wen, Hong -- Li, Yuanyuan -- Xi, Yuanxin -- Jiang, Shiming -- Stratton, Sabrina -- Peng, Danni -- Tanaka, Kaori -- Ren, Yongfeng -- Xia, Zheng -- Wu, Jun -- Li, Bing -- Barton, Michelle C -- Li, Wei -- Li, Haitao -- Shi, Xiaobing -- CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 10;508(7495):263-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13045. Epub 2014 Mar 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3]. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [3]. ; 1] Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2]. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Genes and Development Graduate Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Teaxs 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590075" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Breast Neoplasms/*genetics/metabolism/*pathology ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Chromatin/genetics/metabolism ; Co-Repressor Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disease-Free Survival ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Histones/chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Lysine/*metabolism ; Methylation ; Mice ; Mice, Nude ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Oncogenes/genetics ; Prognosis ; Protein Binding ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; RNA Polymerase II/*metabolism ; Substrate Specificity ; *Transcription Elongation, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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