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  • 1
    ISSN: 1573-7225
    Keywords: China ; Hawaii ; Japan ; migrant studies ; the Philippines ; thyroid neoplasms ; United States
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: We compared incidence rates of primary cancer of the thyroid among United States-born and foreign-born Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino residents of the US with rates among US-born Whites. Thyroid cancers diagnosed between 1973 and 1986 occurring among individuals 15 to 84 years of age residing in western Washington state, the San Francisco-Oakland (California) area, or the state of Hawaii were included in the analysis. Population estimates by age, gender, ethnicity, and country of birth were obtained for these areas from the US Bureau of the Census. Filipino women born in the Philippines had 3.2 (95 percent confidence interval=2.7–3.8) times the rate of thyroid cancer of US-born White women, while US-born Filipino women were not at any increased risk. Philippine-born Filipino men also had a relatively high rate of thyroid cancer (relative risk [RR]=2.6), more so than US-born Filipino men (RR=1.5). Among Japanese, risk of thyroid cancer varied by birthplace, but the direction of the association differed by gender and by histologic type of cancer. No clear association with birthplace was noted among Chinese men or women. These data suggest that persons residing in one or more regions from which Filipino-Americans migrated have been exposed to environmental influences that have increased their subsequent risk of thyroid cancer.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1573-7225
    Keywords: Asian-Americans ; China ; Japan ; migrants ; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma ; Philippines ; United States
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: We examined the incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino residents of the United States to obtain further clues about the etiology of the disease. The age, race, and birthplace of residents of Hawaii, San Francisco/Oakland (California), and western Washington who had received a diagnosis of NHL during the period 1973–86 were obtained from population-based cancer registries, and a special tabulation from the 1980 Census was used to estimate the number of person-years at risk for each category of resident. The incidence of NHL in each of the Asian groups examined was 35 to 85 percent that of US-born Whites. However, there was no consistent trend of increasing incidence with increasing generation of residence in any of the groups. In Asian-Americans, the risk of small cell lymphocytic and plasmacytoid lymphoma was 10 to 85 percent that of Whites, although no clear trends of risk with generation of residence in the US were observed. They also were at a reduced risk of follicular lymphoma, and in Chinese and Japanese persons, the risk was lower in first generation than in later generation migrants (Chinese: Asian-born relative risk [RR]=0.11, US-born, RR=0.84; Japanese: Asian-born, RR=0.15, US-born, RR 0.36). The risk of diffuse lymphoma was similar in Chinese-and Japanese-Americans and US-born Whites. We conclude that, with the exception of follicular lymphoma, the basis for the relatively low incidence of NHL in Asian-Americans does not lie in exposures or characteristics that differ between the migrants themselves and their descendants.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1573-7225
    Keywords: China ; gastric carcinoma ; Japan ; migrant ; subsite ; the Philippines
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Objectives: We examined the incidence of gastric carcinoma in Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino residents of the United States to obtain additional information about the etiology of this disease. Methods: The age, race, and birthplace of residents of Hawaii, San Francisco/Oakland, and northwestern Washington who were diagnosed with gastric carcinoma during the period 1973–1986 were obtained from population-based registries, and a special tabulation from the 1980 Census was used to estimate the number of person-years at risk for each category of resident. Results: The incidence of gastric carcinoma in Japanese- Americans was three to six times higher than that of US-born whites, with the highest rates occurring in those persons born in Japan. The rate in US-born Chinese and Chinese men who immigrated to the US was similar to that of whites, whereas the rate in Chinese female migrants was twice that of white American women. Filipino men, regardless of birthplace, were only at 60% the risk of US-born white men, while their female counterparts had a rate very similar to that of US-born white women. The high incidence observed among Japanese- Americans and Chinese female immigrants was largely restricted to sites other than the gastric cardia. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that dietary and other lifestyle differences between the different generations of Japanese- Americans, and between Japanese residents of the US and Japan may provide clues regarding the etiologies of stomach cancers that arise beyond the gastric cardia.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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