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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; METABOLISM ; IMPACT ; ASSOCIATION ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; insulin ; MELLITUS ; ONCOLOGY ; ASSOCIATIONS ; UPPER AERODIGESTIVE TRACT ; MOLECULAR-MECHANISMS ; BLOOD-GLUCOSE ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; INCREASED RISK ; HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION ; ORAL-CAVITY ; INHANCE CONSORTIUM
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: A history of diabetes is associated with an increased risk of several types of cancers. Whether diabetes is a risk factor for head and neck cancer (HNC) has received little attention. METHODS: We pooled data from 12 case-control studies including 6,448 cases and 13,747 controls, and estimated OR and 95% CI for the associations between diabetes and HNC, adjusted for age, education level, sex, race/ethnicity, study center, cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and body mass index. RESULTS: We observed a weak association between diabetes and the incidence of HNC overall (OR, 1.09; 95% CI: 0.95-1.24). However, we observed a modest association among never smokers (OR, 1.59; 95% CI: 1.22-2.07), and no association among ever smokers (OR, 0.96; 95% CI: 0.83-1.11); likelihood ratio test for interaction P = 0.001. CONCLUSION: A history of diabetes was weakly associated with HNC overall, but we observed evidence of effect modification by smoking status, with a positive association among those who never smoked cigarettes.Impact: This study suggests that glucose metabolism abnormalities may be a HNC risk factor in subgroups of the population. Prospective studies incorporating biomarkers are needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between diabetes and HNC risk, possibly providing new strategies in the prevention of HNC.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22144496
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1433-0350
    Keywords: Key words Callosotomy ; Corpus callosum ; Lennox-Gastaut syndrome
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract  From September 1989 to August 1996, we performed anterior corpus callosotomy in 83 patients. Unfortunately, 9 patients were lost to follow-up. Among the remaining 74 patients, 59 had Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (evolved from infantile spasms in 22), 9 had complex partial seizures with or without secondary generalized seizures, 1 had multifocal independent epileptogenic foci (MISF) syndrome, 3 had hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy (HHE), and 2 had infantile spasms. All cases were followed up for at least 2 years after surgery. The highest rate of significant improvement (more than 50% reduction in seizure frequency) was noted in the patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures, 82.1% of whom experienced significant improvement, followed by those with generalized tonic seizures (76.7%), atonic seizures (72.7%), myoclonic seizures (64.9%), atypical absences (58.6%), and complex partial seizure with or without secondary generalization (61.5%). Complete freedom from seizures was noted in 14 cases (18.9%). One patient had the anterior half of his right palm amputated following radial artery thrombosis complicated by insertion of an arterial line during anesthesia. Otherwise, there were no major postoperative complications except for brief mutism and multifocal jerks in some patients during the 1st postoperative week. Thus, we conclude that corpus callosotomy is a safe alternative treatment for all kinds of medically intractable seizures, especially generalized epilepsy.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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