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  • COMMON VARIANTS  (16)
  • DISEASE  (9)
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELL ; Germany ; LUNG ; neoplasms ; PROSTATE ; COMMON ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; DISEASE ; HISTORY ; incidence ; NEW-YORK ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; SITES ; renal ; SKIN ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; BREAST-CANCER ; AGE ; genetics ; etiology ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; leukemia ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; SIR ; familial risk ; NATIONWIDE ; ATTRIBUTABLE RISKS ; FAMILY-CANCER DATABASE ; NONPOLYPOSIS COLORECTAL-CANCER ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; GUIDELINES ; familial cancers,heritable cancer,clinical counseling,familial risk ; GENOMIC MEDICINE ; HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; TESTICULAR CANCER
    Abstract: Familial risks for cancer are important for clinical counseling and understanding cancer etiology. Medically verified data on familial risks have not been available for all types of cancer. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes all Swedes born in 1932 and later (0-to 68-year-old offspring) with their parents, totaling over 10.2 million individuals. Cancer cases were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry up to year 2000. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence limits (Cl) were calculated for age-specific familial risk in offspring by an exact proband status. The familial risks for offspring cancer were increased at 24/25 sites from concordant cancer in only the parent, at 20/21 sites from a sibling proband and at 12/12 sites from a parent and sibling proband. The highest SIRs by parent were for Hodgkin's disease (4.88) and testicular (4.26), non-medullary thyroid (3.26), ovarian (3.15) and esophageal (3.14) cancer and for multiple myeloma (3.33). When a sibling was affected, even prostate, renal, squamous cell skin, endocrine, gastric and lung cancer and leukemia showed SIRs in excess of 3.00. The highest cumulative risks were found for familial breast (5.5%) and prostate (4.2%) cancers. We identified reliable familial risks for 24 common neoplasms, most of which lack guidelines for clinical counseling or action level. If, for example, a familial SIR of 2.2 would be use as an action level, counseling would be needed for most cancers at some diagnostic age groups. The present data provide the basis for clinical counseling. (C) 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14618624
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; POPULATION ; RISK ; TUMORS ; COMPLEX ; RISK-FACTORS ; BRCA1 ; ovarian cancer ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONSORTIUM ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; COMMON VARIANTS ; TUMOR SUBTYPES ; 14Q24.1 RAD51L1
    Abstract: The 19p13.1 breast cancer susceptibility locus is a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is also associated with risk of ovarian cancer. Here we investigated 19p13.1 variation and risk of breast cancer subtypes, defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) status, using 48,869 breast cancer cases and 49,787 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Variants from 19p13.1 were not associated with breast cancer overall or with ER-positive breast cancer but were significantly associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk [rs8170 Odds Ratio (OR)=1.10, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.05 - 1.15, p=3.49 x 10-5] and triple negative (TN) (ER, PR and HER2 negative) breast cancer [rs8170 OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.13 - 1.31, p=2.22 x 10-7]. However, rs8170 was no longer associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk when TN cases were excluded [OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.89 - 1.07, p=0.62]. In addition, a combined analysis of TN cases from BCAC and the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (n=3,566) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8170 and TN breast cancer risk [OR=1.25, 95% CI 1.18 - 1.33, p=3.31 x 10-13]. Thus, 19p13.1 is the first triple negative-specific breast cancer risk locus and the first locus specific to a histological subtype defined by ER, PR, and HER2 to be identified. These findings provide convincing evidence that genetic susceptibility to breast cancer varies by tumor subtype and that triple negative tumors and other subtypes likely arise through distinct etiologic pathways.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22331459
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  • 3
    Keywords: RISK ; ALLELES ; GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ; LOCI ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; COMMON VARIANTS ; EPISTASIS ; IDENTIFIES 2 ; ERAP1
    Abstract: Part of the substantial unexplained familial aggregation of breast cancer may be due to interactions between common variants, but few studies have had adequate statistical power to detect interactions of realistic magnitude. We aimed to assess all two-way interactions in breast cancer susceptibility between 70 917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected primarily based on prior evidence of a marginal effect. Thirty-eight international studies contributed data for 46 450 breast cancer cases and 42 461 controls of European origin as part of a multi-consortium project (COGS). First, SNPs were preselected based on evidence (P 〈 0.01) of a per-allele main effect, and all two-way combinations of those were evaluated by a per-allele (1 d.f.) test for interaction using logistic regression. Second, all 2.5 billion possible two-SNP combinations were evaluated using Boolean operation-based screening and testing, and SNP pairs with the strongest evidence of interaction (P 〈 10(-4)) were selected for more careful assessment by logistic regression. Under the first approach, 3277 SNPs were preselected, but an evaluation of all possible two-SNP combinations (1 d.f.) identified no interactions at P 〈 10(-8). Results from the second analytic approach were consistent with those from the first (P 〉 10(-10)). In summary, we observed little evidence of two-way SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility, despite the large number of SNPs with potential marginal effects considered and the very large sample size. This finding may have important implications for risk prediction, simplifying the modelling required. Further comprehensive, large-scale genome-wide interaction studies may identify novel interacting loci if the inherent logistic and computational challenges can be overcome.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24242184
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  • 4
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; tumor ; POPULATION ; chromosome ; LYMPHOCYTES ; OUTCOMES ; LOCUS ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; COMMON VARIANTS
    Abstract: Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2p36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49-2.19); P for trend=1.90 x 10(-9)). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24937182
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  • 5
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; BINDING ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR-ALPHA ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; RISK LOCUS ; COMMON VARIANTS ; FUNCTIONAL VARIANTS ; FOXA1 ; ANALYSES REVEAL
    Abstract: We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further 5795 cases and 6624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (odds ratios [OR] = 0.90 [0.88-0.92]; P-value = 1.58 x 10(-25)). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs865686, that spans 14.5 kb. We identified two additional independent association signals demarcated by SNPs rs10816625 (OR = 1.12 [1.08-1.17]; P-value = 7.89 x 10(-09)) and rs13294895 (OR = 1.09 [1.06-1.12]; P-value = 2.97 x 10(-11)). SNP rs10816625, but not rs13294895, was also associated with risk of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR = 1.12 [1.06-1.18]; P-value = 2.77 x 10(-05)). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone-dependent breast cancer, including ER-alpha, FOXA1 and GATA-3. In vitro analyses indicate that rs10816625 and rs13294895 have allele-specific effects on enhancer activity and suggest chromatin interactions with the KLF4 gene locus. These results demonstrate the power of dense genotyping in large studies to identify independent susceptibility variants. Analysis of associations using subjects with different ancestry, combined with bioinformatic and genomic characterisation, can provide strong evidence for the likely causative alleles and their functional basis.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25652398
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  • 6
    Keywords: TUMORS ; STABILITY ; ARCHITECTURE ; mammographic density ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; AUTOPHAGY ; COMMON VARIANTS ; BRCA2 MUTATION CARRIERS ; GENOTYPE IMPUTATION ; ZNF365
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies have identified SNPs near ZNF365 at 10q21.2 that are associated with both breast cancer risk and mammographic density. To identify the most likely causal SNPs, we fine mapped the association signal by genotyping 428 SNPs across the region in 89,050 European and 12,893 Asian case and control subjects from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We identified four independent sets of correlated, highly trait-associated variants (iCHAVs), three of which were located within ZNF365. The most strongly risk-associated SNP, rs10995201 in iCHAV1, showed clear evidence of association with both estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (OR = 0.85 10.82-0.881) and ER-negative (OR = 0.87 [0.82-0.911) disease, and was also the SNP most strongly associated with percent mammographic density. iCHAV2 (lead SNP, chr10: 64,258,684:0) and iCHAV3 (lead SNP, rs7922449) were also associated with ER-positive (OR = 0.93 10.91-0.951 and OR = 1.06 [1.03-1.091) and ER-negative (OR = 0.95 [0.91-0.98] and OR = 1.08 [1.04-1.131) disease. There was weaker evidence for iCHAV4, located 5' of ADO, associated only with ER-positive breast cancer (OR = 0.93 [0.90-0.961). We found 12, 17, 18, and 2 candidate causal SNPs for breast cancer in iCHAVs 1-4, respectively. Chromosome conformation capture analysis showed that iCHAV2 interacts with the ZNF365 and NRBF2 (more than 600 kb away) promoters in normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells. Luciferase assays did not identify SNPs that affect transactivation of ZNF365, but identified a protective haplotype in iCHAV2, associated with silencing of the NRBF2 promoter, implicating this gene in the etiology of breast cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26073781
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  • 7
    Keywords: RISK ; BRCA1 ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; METAANALYSIS ; ESTROGEN ; ALLELES ; CHEK2-ASTERISK-1100DELC ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; COMMON VARIANTS ; GENOTYPE IMPUTATION
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining approximately 14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls together with 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 211,155-marker custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to women of European ancestry. We generated genotypes for more than 11 million SNPs by imputation using the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel, and we identified 15 new loci associated with breast cancer at P 〈 5 x 10(-8). Combining association analysis with ChIP-seq chromatin binding data in mammary cell lines and ChIA-PET chromatin interaction data from ENCODE, we identified likely target genes in two regions: SETBP1 at 18q12.3 and RNF115 and PDZK1 at 1q21.1. One association appears to be driven by an amino acid substitution encoded in EXO1.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25751625
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; SURVIVAL ; carcinoma ; KINASE ; MODEL ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; DISEASE ; GENE ; PROTEIN ; ACTIVATION ; BASE ; protein kinase ; PROTEIN-KINASE ; treatment ; ASSOCIATION ; FREQUENCY ; polymorphism ; SIGNAL ; FREQUENCIES ; ACID ; STAGE ; DESIGN ; MUTATION ; MELANOMA ; METASTATIC MELANOMA ; SWEDEN ; MUTATIONS ; PARAMETERS ; MULTIVARIATE ; MALIGNANT-MELANOMA ; CANCER-RESEARCH ; B-RAF ; BRAF ; HIGH-FREQUENCY ; KINASE PATHWAYS ; N-RAS
    Abstract: Purpose: The RAS-RAF-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways mediate the cellular response to growth signals. In melanocytes, BRAF is involved in cAMP-dependent growth signals. Recently, activating mutations in the BRAF gene, were reported in a large proportion of melanomas. We have studied mutations in the BRAF gene and their association with clinical parameters. Experimental Design: We analyzed exons 1, 11, and 15 of the BRAF gene and exons 1 and 2 of the N-ras gene for mutations in 38 metastatic melanomas by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing. Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate analyses were used to correlate mutations with various clinical parameters. Results: Mutations in exon 15 of the BRAF gene were detected in 26 (68%) melanomas. In 25 cases, mutation involved the "hot spot" codon 600(2) of the BRAF gene. Three melanomas without a BRAF mutation carried amino acid substituting base changes at codon 61 of the N-ras gene. In a multivariate proportional hazard (Cox) model, BRAF mutation, along with the stage of metastatic melanomas, showed a statistically significant hazard ratio of 2.16 (95% confidence interval 1.02-4.59; chi(2) for the model 6.94, degrees of freedom 2, P = 0.03) for diminished duration of response to the treatment. In a Kaplan-Meier survival model, cases with BRAF mutation showed longer disease-free survival (median of 12 months) than cases without mutation (median of 5 months), although this association was not statistically significant (Log-rank test P = 0.13). Conclusions: Our results, besides confirming the high frequency of BRAF mutations in metastatic melanomas, also underline the potential importance of these mutations in disease outcome
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12960123
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; PROSTATE ; DISEASE ; HISTORY ; incidence ; NEW-YORK ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; SITES ; GENE ; GENES ; PATIENT ; kidney ; FAMILY ; MEMBER ; MEMBERS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST-CANCER ; etiology ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; SIR ; familial risk ; NATIONWIDE ; FAMILY-CANCER DATABASE ; GUIDELINES ; GENOMIC MEDICINE ; TESTICULAR CANCER ; CELL TUMORS ; familial cancers,heritable cancer,clinical counseling,urology ; LINDAU-DISEASE
    Abstract: Familial risks for cancer are important for clinical counseling and understanding cancer etiology. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes all Swedes born in 1932 and later (0 to 68-year-old offspring) with their parents, totaling over 10.2 million individuals. Urological cancer cases were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry up to year 2000. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence limits (CI) were calculated for age-specific familial risk in offspring by an exact proband status. The familial risks for offspring cancer were increased at all urological sites from concordant cancer in the parent and in a sibling proband. The highest SIRs by parent were for testicular and prostate cancer (4.26 and 2.45). When a sibling was affected, even kidney cancer (4.74) showed a high SIR. For kidney cancers, and also for prostate and testicular cancers, the SIRs were higher among siblings than among offspring and parents, which may indicate the involvement of recessive effects. Family members of patients with prostate cancer or von Hippel Lindau disease can expect organized clinical counseling, but family members of patients with other urological cancers are probably not counseled. Guidelines for clinical counseling or action level should be developed for all urological cancers because of the established familial risks. Urological cancers also offer a challenge to molecular geneticists attempting to identify the susceptibility genes underlying the familial clustering
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14615900
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; SURVIVAL ; MODEL ; MODELS ; GENERATION ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; MORTALITY ; POPULATION ; RISKS ; TIME ; FAMILY ; PHENOTYPES ; MELANOMA ; SWEDEN ; PHENOTYPE ; CHILDHOOD ; FRAMEWORK ; FAMILIES ; heritability ; familial aggregation ; TWINS ; function ; ONSET ; CANCERS ; population-based ; modelling ; RARE ; CHILD ; SURVIVAL-DATA ; ENVIRONMENTAL-FACTORS ; GIBBS SAMPLING APPROACH ; GLMM ; hierarchical likelihood ; quantitative genetics ; VARIANCE-COMPONENTS
    Abstract: Estimation of genetic and environmental contributions to cancers falls in the framework of generalized linear mixed modelling with several random effect components. Computational challenges remain, however, in dealing with binary or survival phenotypes. In this paper, we consider the analysis of melanoma onset in a population of 2.6 million nuclear families in Sweden, for which none of the current survival-based methodologies is feasible. We treat the disease outcome as a binary phenotype, so that the standard proportional hazard model leads to a generalized linear model with the complementary-log link function. For rare diseases this link is very close to the probit link, and thus allows the use of marginal likelihood for the estimation of the variance components. We correct for the survival length bias by censoring the parent generation within each family at the time they attain the same cumulative hazard as the child generation, thus improving the validity of the estimates. Our finding that childhood shared environment in addition to genetic factors had a considerable effect on the development of melanoma is consistent with epidemiological studies. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16372390
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