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  • DISEASE  (27)
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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; RISKS ; AGE ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; TOBACCO ; GLUCOSE ; BODY ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; nutrition ; pancreatic cancer ; RELATIVE RISK ; physical activity ; MASS INDEX ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; WAIST ; INTERVAL ; pancreatic ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; PARTICIPANTS ; anthropometry ; prospective ; RISK-FACTOR ; BODY-FAT DISTRIBUTION ; hip ; MALE SMOKERS
    Abstract: Tobacco smoking is the only established risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Results from several epidemiologic studies have suggested that increased body mass index and/or lack of physical activity may be associated with an increased risk of this disease. We examined the relationship between anthropometry and physical activity recorded at baseline and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (n = 438,405 males and females age 19-84 years and followed for a total of 2,826,070 person-years). Relative risks (RR) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and country and adjusted for smoking and self-reported diabetes and, where appropriate, height. In total, there were 324 incident cases of pancreatic cancer diagnosed in the cohort over an average of 6 years of follow-up. There was evidence that the RR of pancreatic cancer was associated with increased height [RR, 1.74; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.20-2.52] for highest quartile compared with lowest quartile (P-trend = 0.001). However, this trend was primarily due to a low risk in the lowest quartile, as when this group was excluded, the trend was no longer statistically significant (P = 0.27). A larger waist-to-hip ratio and waist circumference were both associated with an increased risk of developing the disease (RR per 0.1, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.04-1.48; P-trend = 0.02 and RR per 10 cm, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.01-1.26; P-trend = 0.03, respectively). There was a nonsignificant increased risk of pancreatic cancer with increasing body mass index (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.95-1.24 per 5 kg/m(2)), and a nonsignificant decreased risk with total physical activity (RR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.50-1.35 for most active versus inactive). Future studies should consider including measurements of waist and hip circumference, to further investigate the relationship between central adiposity and the risk of pancreatic cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16702364
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; CELL ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SYSTEM ; cohort study ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; LYMPHOMA ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; etiology ; risk factors ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; B-CELL LYMPHOMA ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; ONCOLOGY ; DIETARY FACTORS ; ASSOCIATIONS ; IMMUNE-SYSTEM ; non-Hodgkin lymphoma ; INTERVAL ; FRUITS ; methods ; function ; prospective ; prospective study ; RISK-FACTOR ; HODGKIN LYMPHOMA ; B-CELL ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; DRINKING-WATER NITRATE
    Abstract: Introduction Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant diseases of cells of the immune system. The best-established risk factors are related to dys-regulation of immune function, and evidence suggests that factors such as dietary or lifestyle habits may be involved in the etiology. Material and methods In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 849 lymphoma cases were identified in a median follow-up period of 6.4 years. Fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated from validated dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association between fruit and vegetable intake with the risk of lymphomas overall and subentities. Results There was no overall association between total fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphoma [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-1.15 comparing highest with lowest quartile]. However, the risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) tended to be lower in participants with a high intake of total vegetables (HR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.23-1.02). Conclusion In this large prospective study, an inverse associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphomas overall could not be confirmed. Associations with lymphoma subentities such as DLBCL warrant further investigation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17443415
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; DISEASE ; POPULATION ; validation ; COMPLEX ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; ACID ; PLASMA ; MEN ; CENTERS ; EPIC ; nutrition ; FOOD-INTAKE ; nutrient intake ; SERUM PHOSPHOLIPIDS ; EPIC CALIBRATION ; 24-HOUR DIET RECALL ; prospective ; biological markers ; INVESTIGATE ; PROCESSED FOODS
    Abstract: Background: Plasma phospholipid fatty acids have been correlated with food intakes in populations with homogeneous dietary patterns. However, few data are available on populations with heterogeneous dietary patterns. Objective: The objective was to investigate whether plasma phospholipid fatty acids are suitable biomarkers of dietary intakes across populations involved in a large European multicenter study. Design: A cross-sectional study design nested to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) was conducted to determine plasma fatty acid profiles in 〉 3000 subjects from 16 centers, who had also completed 24-h dietary recalls and dietary questionnaires. Plasma fatty acids were assessed by capillary gas chromatography. Ecological and individual correlations were calculated between fatty acids and select food groups. Results: The most important determinant of plasma fatty acids was region, which suggests that the variations across regions are largely due to different food intakes. Strong ecological correlations were observed between fish intake and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (r = 0.78, P 〈 0.01), olive oil and oleic acid (r = 0.73, P 〈 0.01), and margarine and elaidic acid (r = 0.76, P 〈 0.01). Individual correlations varied across the regions, particularly between olive oil and oleic acid and between alcohol and the saturation index, as an indicator of stearoyl CoA desaturase activity. Conclusions: These findings indicate that specific plasma phospholipid fatty acids are suitable biomarkers of some food intakes in the EPIC Study. Moreover, these findings suggest complex interactions between alcohol intake and fatty acid metabolism, which warrants further attention in epidemiologic studies relating dietary fatty acids to alcohol-related cancers and other chronic diseases. Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 89: 331-46
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19056549
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; COMBINATION ; Germany ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; EXPOSURE ; POPULATION ; RISK ; CONTRAST ; ASSOCIATION ; ACID ; PATTERNS ; COUNTRIES ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; REGION ; FRANCE ; REGIONS ; POPULATIONS ; NETHERLANDS ; FUTURE ; PROJECT ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; nutrient intake ; VITAMIN-E ; RETINOL ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PATTERN ; SCIENCE ; methods ; dietary patterns ; prospective ; vitamin D ; VITAMIN-D ; ERRORS ; RATIONALE ; Vitamin E ; Exposure assessment
    Abstract: Until recently, the study of nutrient patterns was hampered at an international level by a lack of standardization of both dietary methods and nutrient databases. We aimed to describe the diversity of nutrient patterns in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study at population level as a starting point for future nutrient pattern analyses and their associations with chronic diseases in multi-center studies. In this cross-sectional study, 36,034 persons aged 35-74 y were administered a single, standardized 24-h dietary recall. Intake of 25 nutrients (excluding intake from dietary supplements) was estimated using a standardized nutrient database. We used a graphic presentation of mean nutrient intakes by region and sex relative to the overall EPIC means to contrast patterns within and between 10 European countries. In Mediterranean regions, including Greece, Italy, and the southern centers of Spain, the nutrient pattern was dominated by relatively high intakes of vitamin E and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), whereas intakes of retinol and vitamin D were relatively low. In contrast, in Nordic countries, including Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, reported intake of these same nutrients resulted in almost the opposite pattern. Population groups in Germany, The Netherlands, and the UK shared a fatty acid pattern of relatively high intakes of PUFA and SFA and relatively low intakes of MUFA, in combination with a relatively high intake of sugar. We confirmed large variability in nutrient intakes across the EPIC study populations and identified 3 main region-specific patterns with a geographical gradient within and between European countries. J. Nutr. 140: 1280-1286, 2010
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20484545
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  • 5
    Keywords: COHORT ; DISEASE ; RISK ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; DIET ; CALIBRATION ; RED MEAT ; CERTIFICATES ; 21-YEAR FOLLOW-UP ; VEGETARIANS
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Recently, some US cohorts have shown a moderate association between red and processed meat consumption and mortality supporting the results of previous studies among vegetarians. The aim of this study was to examine the association of red meat, processed meat, and poultry consumption with the risk of early death in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: Included in the analysis were 448,568 men and women without prevalent cancer, stroke, or myocardial infarction, and with complete information on diet, smoking, physical activity and body mass index, who were between 35 and 69 years old at baseline. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the association of meat consumption with all-cause and cause-specific mortality. RESULTS: As of June 2009, 26,344 deaths were observed. After multivariate adjustment, a high consumption of red meat was related to higher all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01 to 1.28, 160+ versus 10 to 19.9 g/day), and the association was stronger for processed meat (HR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.24 to 1.66, 160+ versus 10 to 19.9 g/day). After correction for measurement error, higher all-cause mortality remained significant only for processed meat (HR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.25, per 50 g/d). We estimated that 3.3% (95% CI 1.5% to 5.0%) of deaths could be prevented if all participants had a processed meat consumption of less than 20 g/day. Significant associations with processed meat intake were observed for cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and 'other causes of death'. The consumption of poultry was not related to all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our analysis support a moderate positive association between processed meat consumption and mortality, in particular due to cardiovascular diseases, but also to cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23497300
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; BLOOD ; CELL ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; cohort study ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; HISTORY ; LONG-TERM ; POPULATION ; RISK ; SAMPLES ; HEART ; RISK-FACTORS ; CYCLE ; ASSOCIATION ; FREQUENCY ; FREQUENCIES ; HEALTH ; PLASMA ; WOMEN ; MEN ; risk factors ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; COMPONENT ; DATABASE ; PRESSURE ; DIET ; nutrition ; SERUM ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; fat distribution ; development ; EVENTS ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; prospective ; prospective study ; DIETARY ASSESSMENT METHODS ; RISK-FACTOR ; study protocol ; CORONARY-ARTERY-DISEASE ; EPIC heart ; HIGH BLOOD-PRESSURE ; NORFOLK COHORT
    Abstract: EPIC-Heart is the cardiovascular component of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ( EPIC), a multi-centre prospective cohort study investigating the relationship between nutrition and major chronic disease outcomes. Its objective is to advance understanding about the separate and combined influences of lifestyle ( especially dietary), environmental, metabolic and genetic factors in the development of cardiovascular diseases by making best possible use of the unusually informative database and biological samples in EPIC. Between 1992 and 2000, 519,978 participants ( 366,521 women and 153,457 men, mostly aged 35 - 70 years) in 23 centres in 10 European countries commenced follow-up for causespecific mortality, cancer incidence and major cardiovascular morbidity. Dietary information was collected with quantitative questionnaires or semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires, including a 24-h dietary recall sub-study to help calibrate the dietary measurements. Information was collected on physical activity, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, occupational history, socio-economic status, and history of previous illnesses. Anthropometric measurements and blood pressure recordings were made in the majority of participants. Blood samples were taken from 385,747 individuals, from which plasma, serum, red cells, and buffy coat fractions were separated and aliquoted for long-term storage. By 2004, an estimated 10,000 incident fatal and non-fatal coronary and stroke events had been recorded. The first cycle of EPIC-Heart analyses will assess associations of coronary mortality with several prominent dietary hypotheses and with established cardiovascular risk factors. Subsequent analyses will extend this approach to non-fatal cardiovascular outcomes and to further dietary, biochemical and genetic factors
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17295097
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; PROSTATE ; FOLLOW-UP ; DISEASE ; RISK ; RISKS ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; HEALTH ; DESIGN ; PLASMA ; AGE ; MEN ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; RECRUITMENT ; DIETARY ; ALCOHOL ; BODY ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; tocopherols ; RELATIVE RISK ; BETA-CAROTENE ; VITAMIN-E ; HETEROGENEITY ; physical activity ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; carotenoids ; LYCOPENE ; MASS INDEX ; MASSES ; RETINOL ; SERUM ; BODIES ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE ; SUPPLEMENTATION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; LEVEL ; USA ; prospective ; UNIT ; CANCER-RISK ; GAMMA-TOCOPHEROL ; nested case-control study ; micronutrients ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; BODY-MASS ; BODY-MASS-INDEX
    Abstract: Background: Previous studies suggest that high plasma concentrations of carotenoids, retinol, or tocopherols may reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Objective: We aimed to examine the associations between plasma concentrations of 7 carotenoids, retinol, a-tocopherol, and,gamma-tocopherol and prostate cancer risk. Design: A total of 137 001 men in 8 European countries participated. After a mean of 6 y, 966 incident cases of prostate cancer with plasma were available. A total of 1064 control subjects were selected and were matched for study center, age, and date of recruitment. The relative risk of prostate cancer was estimated by conditional logistic regression, which was adjusted for smoking status, alcohol intake, body mass index, marital status, physical activity, and education level. Results: Overall, none of the micronutrients examined were significantly associated with prostate cancer risk. For lycopene and the sum of carotenoids, there was evidence of heterogeneity between the associations with risks of localized and advanced disease. These carotenoids were not associated with the risk of localized disease but were inversely associated with the risk of advanced disease. The risk of advanced disease for men in the highest fifth of plasma concentrations compared with men in the lowest fifth was 0.40 (95% CI: 0. 19, 0.88) for lycopene and 0.35 (95% CI: 0. 17, 0.78) for the sum of carotenoids. Conclusions: We observed no associations between plasma concentrations of carotenoids, retinol, or tocopherols and overall prostate cancer risk. The inverse associations of lycopene and the sum of carotenoids with the risk of advanced disease may involve a protective effect, an association of dietary choice with delayed detection of prostate cancer, reverse causality, or other factors
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17823432
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; evaluation ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; EXPOSURE ; incidence ; RISK ; validation ; IMPACT ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; FISH ; REGION ; MEASUREMENT ERROR ; FRANCE ; REGIONS ; VARIABILITY ; DIET ; DIETARY ; SERIES ; OUTCOMES ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; FOOD ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; HETEROGENEITY ; MULTICENTER COHORT ; REGRESSION ; INCREASE ; DIETARY QUESTIONNAIRE ASSESSMENTS ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; LEVEL ; methods ; NUTRITIONAL EPIDEMIOLOGY ; CANCER INCIDENCE ; prospective ; ENGLAND ; SET ; outcome ; ERRORS ; RATIO ; VALUES ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; hazard ratio ; CONFIDENCE-INTERVALS ; multicentre study ; TIME-SCALE
    Abstract: Background International multicentre studies on diet and cancer are relatively new in epidemiological research. They offer a series of challenging methodological issues for the evaluation of the association between dietary exposure and disease outcomes, which can both be quite heterogeneous across different geographical regions. This requires considerable work to standardize dietary measurements at the food and the nutrient levels. Methods Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a calibration study was set up to express individual dietary intakes according to the same reference scale. A linear regression calibration model was used to correct the association between diet and disease for measurement errors in dietary exposures. In the present work, we describe an approach for analysing the EPIC data, using as an example the evaluation of the association between fish intake and colorectal cancer incidence. Results Sex- and country-specific attenuation factors ranged from 0.083 to 0.784, with values overall higher for men compared with women. Hazard ratio estimates of colorectal cancer for a 10 g/day increase in fish intake were 0.97 [95 confidence interval (CI): 0.950.99] and 0.93 (0.880.98), before and after calibration, respectively. Conclusions In a multicentre study, the diet/disease association can be evaluated by exploiting the whole variability of intake over the entire study. Calibration may reduce between-centre heterogeneity in the dietdisease relationship caused by differential impact of measurement errors across cohorts
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18180242
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; PATTERNS ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; cancer risk ; RISK FACTOR ; DIET ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; HETEROGENEITY ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; PRODUCTS ; DIETARY-INTAKE MEASUREMENTS ; RELATIVE VALIDITY ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; MEAT CONSUMPTION ; TEMPERATURE ; USA ; prospective ; RED MEAT ; UNIT ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; processed meat ; DAIRY-PRODUCTS ; breast cancer risk ; hazard ratio ; INVESTIGATE ; PROPORTION ; RECEPTOR STATUS ; DIFFERENT COUNTRIES ; LIFE-STYLE CHANGES
    Abstract: Background: A Western diet is associated with breast cancer risk. Objective: We investigated the relation of meat, egg, and dairy product consumption with breast cancer risk by using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Design: Between 1992 and 2003, information on diet was collected from 319,826 women. Disease hazard ratios were estimated with multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Results: Breast cancer cases (n = 7119) were observed during 8.8 y (median) of follow-up. No consistent association was found between breast cancer risk and the consumption of any of the food groups under study, when analyzed by both categorical and continuous exposure variable models. High processed meat consumption was associated with a modest increase in breast cancer risk in the categorical model (hazard ratio: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.20; highest compared with lowest quintile: P for trend = 0.07). Subgroup analyses suggested an association with butter consumption, limited to premenopausal women (hazard ratio: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.53; highest compared with lowest quintile: P for trend = 0.21). Between-country heterogeneity was found for red meat (Q statistic = 18.03; P = 0.05) and was significantly explained (P = 0.023) by the proportion of meat cooked at high temperature. Conclusions: We have not consistently identified intakes of meat, eggs, or dairy products as risk factors for breast cancer. Future studies should investigate the possible role of high-temperature cooking in the relation of red meat intake with breast cancer risk. Am J Clin Nutr 2009;90:602-12
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19491385
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; RISK ; METABOLISM ; CARCINOGENESIS ; PHOSPHORUS ; NEOPLASIA ; HEALTH ; AGE ; WOMEN ; COUNTRIES ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; DIETARY ; CALCIUM ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; EUROPE ; FOOD ; nutrient intake ; EPIC CALIBRATION ; RECALL ; IRON ; 24-HOUR DIET RECALL ; POTASSIUM ; MAINTENANCE ; 24-h dietary recall ; RATIONALE ; EPIC-soft ; magnesium ; minerals ; nutrient intakes
    Abstract: Background/objectives: Adequate mineral intake is important for the maintenance of bone health, cellular function and general metabolism, and possibly in the aetiology of cancer and other chronic diseases. This study aimed at investigating variation in intakes of selected minerals across 10 European countries participating in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) study. Methods: Nutrient intakes for 36 034 subjects, aged between 35 and 74 years, in 27 centres were obtained using standardized 24-h dietary recall software (EPIC-SOFT). Mean intakes of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron and potassium were calculated by centre and weighted by season and day of the week and were also stratified by age group. The contribution of food groups to total nutrient intake was calculated. Results: There was clear geographical variability in intakes, with differences ranging from 35% for magnesium to 90% for iron in men and 36% for potassium to 75% for calcium in women, and a twofold difference in sources of haem iron (meat and fish). There was a geographical gradient in iron intake, with higher intakes in Southern than in Northern Europe and also around a twofold north-south gradient in the contribution of fruits and vegetables to potassium intake. Compared with reference intakes, the majority of age groups and centres had intakes above the recommended levels. Dairy foods and products contributed the most to calcium and phosphorus intake in almost all centres. Cereals and cereal products contributed the most to magnesium and iron intakes, except in Greece and Germany. Conclusions: Intakes of minerals vary substantially throughout Europe, with some geographical variability in their food sources.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19888269
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