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  • Articles  (3)
  • Disease Models, Animal  (3)
  • Nature Publishing Group (NPG)  (3)
  • American Chemical Society
  • Macmillian Magazines Ltd.
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-11-13
    Description: The role of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in metastasis is a longstanding source of debate, largely owing to an inability to monitor transient and reversible EMT phenotypes in vivo. Here we establish an EMT lineage-tracing system to monitor this process in mice, using a mesenchymal-specific Cre-mediated fluorescent marker switch system in spontaneous breast-to-lung metastasis models. We show that within a predominantly epithelial primary tumour, a small proportion of tumour cells undergo EMT. Notably, lung metastases mainly consist of non-EMT tumour cells that maintain their epithelial phenotype. Inhibiting EMT by overexpressing the microRNA miR-200 does not affect lung metastasis development. However, EMT cells significantly contribute to recurrent lung metastasis formation after chemotherapy. These cells survived cyclophosphamide treatment owing to reduced proliferation, apoptotic tolerance and increased expression of chemoresistance-related genes. Overexpression of miR-200 abrogated this resistance. This study suggests the potential of an EMT-targeting strategy, in conjunction with conventional chemotherapies, for breast cancer treatment.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4662610/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4662610/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Fischer, Kari R -- Durrans, Anna -- Lee, Sharrell -- Sheng, Jianting -- Li, Fuhai -- Wong, Stephen T C -- Choi, Hyejin -- El Rayes, Tina -- Ryu, Seongho -- Troeger, Juliane -- Schwabe, Robert F -- Vahdat, Linda T -- Altorki, Nasser K -- Mittal, Vivek -- Gao, Dingcheng -- 1 F31 CA186510-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F31 CA186510/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA135417/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01 CA188388/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54 CA149196-05/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Nov 26;527(7579):472-6. doi: 10.1038/nature15748. Epub 2015 Nov 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Neuberger Berman Lung Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Department of Systems Medicine and Bioengineering, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Methodist Cancer Center, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, 77030 USA. ; Soonchunhyang Institute of Medi-bio Science (SIMS), Soonchunhyang University, 25 Bongjeong-ro Cheonan-Si, Chungcheongnam-do 31151, South Korea. ; Department of Medicine, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; Institute of Human Nutrition, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26560033" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Apoptosis/drug effects ; Cell Lineage ; Cell Proliferation/drug effects ; Cell Tracking ; Cyclophosphamide/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Disease Models, Animal ; Disease Progression ; *Drug Resistance, Neoplasm/drug effects/genetics ; *Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition/drug effects/genetics ; Female ; Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy/genetics/*pathology/*secondary ; Male ; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/*drug therapy/genetics/*pathology ; Mice ; MicroRNAs/genetics ; Neoplasm Metastasis/drug therapy/genetics/*pathology ; Reproducibility of Results
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-07-22
    Description: Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 are among the most common genetic alterations in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC), a deadly liver cancer. Mutant IDH proteins in IHCC and other malignancies acquire an abnormal enzymatic activity allowing them to convert alpha-ketoglutarate (alphaKG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), which inhibits the activity of multiple alphaKG-dependent dioxygenases, and results in alterations in cell differentiation, survival, and extracellular matrix maturation. However, the molecular pathways by which IDH mutations lead to tumour formation remain unclear. Here we show that mutant IDH blocks liver progenitor cells from undergoing hepatocyte differentiation through the production of 2HG and suppression of HNF-4alpha, a master regulator of hepatocyte identity and quiescence. Correspondingly, genetically engineered mouse models expressing mutant IDH in the adult liver show an aberrant response to hepatic injury, characterized by HNF-4alpha silencing, impaired hepatocyte differentiation, and markedly elevated levels of cell proliferation. Moreover, IDH and Kras mutations, genetic alterations that co-exist in a subset of human IHCCs, cooperate to drive the expansion of liver progenitor cells, development of premalignant biliary lesions, and progression to metastatic IHCC. These studies provide a functional link between IDH mutations, hepatic cell fate, and IHCC pathogenesis, and present a novel genetically engineered mouse model of IDH-driven malignancy.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4499230/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4499230/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Saha, Supriya K -- Parachoniak, Christine A -- Ghanta, Krishna S -- Fitamant, Julien -- Ross, Kenneth N -- Najem, Mortada S -- Gurumurthy, Sushma -- Akbay, Esra A -- Sia, Daniela -- Cornella, Helena -- Miltiadous, Oriana -- Walesky, Chad -- Deshpande, Vikram -- Zhu, Andrew X -- Hezel, Aram F -- Yen, Katharine E -- Straley, Kimberly S -- Travins, Jeremy -- Popovici-Muller, Janeta -- Gliser, Camelia -- Ferrone, Cristina R -- Apte, Udayan -- Llovet, Josep M -- Wong, Kwok-Kin -- Ramaswamy, Sridhar -- Bardeesy, Nabeel -- P50 CA127003/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50CA1270003/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA136567/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK098414/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01CA136567-02/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- England -- Nature. 2014 Sep 4;513(7516):110-4. doi: 10.1038/nature13441. Epub 2014 Jul 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA [2]. ; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] HCC Translational Research Laboratory, Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer Group, Liver Unit, Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Catalonia 08036, Spain [2] Mount Sinai Liver Cancer Program, Division of Liver Diseases, Dept of Medicine. Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York 10029, USA [3] Gastrointestinal Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit, National Cancer Institute, and Department of Experimental Oncology, Milan 20133, Italy. ; HCC Translational Research Laboratory, Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer Group, Liver Unit, Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Catalonia 08036, Spain. ; Mount Sinai Liver Cancer Program, Division of Liver Diseases, Dept of Medicine. Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York 10029, USA. ; Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas 66160, USA. ; University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642, USA. ; Agios Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; 1] HCC Translational Research Laboratory, Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer Group, Liver Unit, Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Catalonia 08036, Spain [2] Mount Sinai Liver Cancer Program, Division of Liver Diseases, Dept of Medicine. Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York 10029, USA [3] Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, Barcelona, Catalonia 08010, Spain [4] University of Barcelona, Catalonia 08036, Spain. ; 1] Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA [2] Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25043045" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Bile Duct Neoplasms/enzymology/genetics/*pathology ; Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic/enzymology/pathology ; Cell Differentiation/*genetics ; Cell Division/genetics ; Cell Lineage/genetics ; Cholangiocarcinoma/enzymology/genetics/*pathology ; Disease Models, Animal ; Female ; Glutarates/metabolism ; Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4/*antagonists & ; inhibitors/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism ; Hepatocytes/enzymology/metabolism/*pathology ; Humans ; Isocitrate Dehydrogenase/*genetics/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Transgenic ; Mutant Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Mutation/genetics ; Neoplasm Metastasis ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Stem Cells/pathology ; ras Proteins/genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-03-31
    Description: Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are common inherited and sporadic vascular malformations that cause strokes and seizures in younger individuals. CCMs arise from endothelial cell loss of KRIT1, CCM2 or PDCD10, non-homologous proteins that form an adaptor complex. How disruption of the CCM complex results in disease remains controversial, with numerous signalling pathways (including Rho, SMAD and Wnt/beta-catenin) and processes such as endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) proposed to have causal roles. CCM2 binds to MEKK3 (refs 7, 8, 9, 10, 11), and we have recently shown that CCM complex regulation of MEKK3 is essential during vertebrate heart development. Here we investigate this mechanism in CCM disease pathogenesis. Using a neonatal mouse model of CCM disease, we show that expression of the MEKK3 target genes Klf2 and Klf4, as well as Rho and ADAMTS protease activity, are increased in the endothelial cells of early CCM lesions. By contrast, we find no evidence of EndMT or increased SMAD or Wnt signalling during early CCM formation. Endothelial-specific loss of Map3k3 (also known as Mekk3), Klf2 or Klf4 markedly prevents lesion formation, reverses the increase in Rho activity, and rescues lethality. Consistent with these findings in mice, we show that endothelial expression of KLF2 and KLF4 is increased in human familial and sporadic CCM lesions, and that a disease-causing human CCM2 mutation abrogates the MEKK3 interaction without affecting CCM complex formation. These studies identify gain of MEKK3 signalling and KLF2/4 function as causal mechanisms for CCM pathogenesis that may be targeted to develop new CCM therapeutics.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4864035/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4864035/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhou, Zinan -- Tang, Alan T -- Wong, Weng-Yew -- Bamezai, Sharika -- Goddard, Lauren M -- Shenkar, Robert -- Zhou, Su -- Yang, Jisheng -- Wright, Alexander C -- Foley, Matthew -- Arthur, J Simon C -- Whitehead, Kevin J -- Awad, Issam A -- Li, Dean Y -- Zheng, Xiangjian -- Kahn, Mark L -- P01 HL075215/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01 HL120846/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01 NS092521/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P01NS092521/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL094326/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01HL-084516/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01HL094326/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01NS075168/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- T32HL07439/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Apr 7;532(7597):122-6. doi: 10.1038/nature17178. Epub 2016 Mar 30.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Medicine and Cardiovascular Institute, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Blvd, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; Laboratory of Cardiovascular Signaling, Centenary Institute, Sydney, New South Wales 2050, Australia. ; Neurovascular Surgery Program, Section of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago Medicine and Biological Sciences, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ; Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; Sydney Microscopy &Microanalysis, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2050, Australia. ; Division of Cell Signaling and Immunology, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UK. ; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and the Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA. ; The Key Laboratory for Human Disease Gene Study of Sichuan Province, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences &Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital, Chengdu, Sichuan 610072, China. ; Faculty of Medicine, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2050, Australia.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27027284" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: ADAM Proteins/metabolism ; Animals ; Animals, Newborn ; Carrier Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Disease Models, Animal ; Endothelial Cells/enzymology/*metabolism ; Female ; Hemangioma, Cavernous, Central Nervous System/etiology/*metabolism/pathology ; Humans ; Kruppel-Like Transcription Factors/deficiency/*metabolism ; MAP Kinase Kinase Kinase 3/deficiency/*metabolism ; *MAP Kinase Signaling System ; Male ; Mice ; Protein Binding ; rho GTP-Binding Proteins/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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