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  • EPIC  (5)
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; PROTECTION ; colorectal cancer ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; FIBER ; DIETARY ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; FOOD
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15283114
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; COMBINATION ; Germany ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; EXPOSURE ; POPULATION ; RISK ; CONTRAST ; ASSOCIATION ; ACID ; PATTERNS ; COUNTRIES ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; REGION ; FRANCE ; REGIONS ; POPULATIONS ; NETHERLANDS ; FUTURE ; PROJECT ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; nutrient intake ; VITAMIN-E ; RETINOL ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PATTERN ; SCIENCE ; methods ; dietary patterns ; prospective ; vitamin D ; VITAMIN-D ; ERRORS ; RATIONALE ; Vitamin E ; Exposure assessment
    Abstract: Until recently, the study of nutrient patterns was hampered at an international level by a lack of standardization of both dietary methods and nutrient databases. We aimed to describe the diversity of nutrient patterns in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study at population level as a starting point for future nutrient pattern analyses and their associations with chronic diseases in multi-center studies. In this cross-sectional study, 36,034 persons aged 35-74 y were administered a single, standardized 24-h dietary recall. Intake of 25 nutrients (excluding intake from dietary supplements) was estimated using a standardized nutrient database. We used a graphic presentation of mean nutrient intakes by region and sex relative to the overall EPIC means to contrast patterns within and between 10 European countries. In Mediterranean regions, including Greece, Italy, and the southern centers of Spain, the nutrient pattern was dominated by relatively high intakes of vitamin E and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), whereas intakes of retinol and vitamin D were relatively low. In contrast, in Nordic countries, including Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, reported intake of these same nutrients resulted in almost the opposite pattern. Population groups in Germany, The Netherlands, and the UK shared a fatty acid pattern of relatively high intakes of PUFA and SFA and relatively low intakes of MUFA, in combination with a relatively high intake of sugar. We confirmed large variability in nutrient intakes across the EPIC study populations and identified 3 main region-specific patterns with a geographical gradient within and between European countries. J. Nutr. 140: 1280-1286, 2010
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20484545
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SUPPORT ; incidence ; RISK ; RISKS ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; LYMPHOMA ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; INDIVIDUALS ; PREVALENCE ; body mass index ; EPIC ; nutrition ; B-CELL LYMPHOMA ; FOLLICULAR LYMPHOMA ; RELATIVE RISK ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; BODIES ; multiple myeloma ; WEIGHT ; prospective studies ; HEIGHT ; methods ; diffuse large B-cell lymphoma ; SUBTYPES ; MASS ; prospective ; prospective study ; NOR ; B-CELL ; body mass ; RATIO ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; non-Hodgkin ; CONFIDENCE-INTERVALS
    Abstract: The incidences of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma are increasing steadily. It has been hypothesized that this may be due, in part, to the parallel rising prevalence of obesity. It is biologically plausible that anthropometric characteristics can infuence the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. DESIGN AND METHODS: In the context of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), anthropometric characteristics were assessed in 371,983 cancer-free individuals at baseline. During the 8.5 years of follow-up, 1,219 histologically confirmed incident cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma occurred in 609 men and 610 women. Gender-specific proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of development of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in relation to the anthropometric characteristics. RESULTS: Height was associated with overall non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in women (RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.14-1.98) for highest versus lowest quartile; p-trend 〈 0.01) but not in men. Neither obesity (weight and body mass index) nor abdominal fat (waist-to-hip ratio, waist or hip circumference) measures were positively associated with overall non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Relative risks for highest versus lowest body mass index quartile were 1.09 (95% CI 0.85-1.38) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.71-1.19) for men and women, respectively. Women in the upper body mass index quartile were at greater risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (RR 2.18, 95% CI 1.05-4.53) and taller women had an elevated risk of follicular lymphoma (RR 1.25, 95% CI 0.59-2.62). Among men, height and body mass index were non-significantly, positively related to follicular lymphoma. Multiple myeloma risk alone was elevated for taller women (RR 2.34, 95% CI 1.29-4.21) and heavier men (RR 1.77, 95% CI 1.02-3.05). CONCLUSIONS: The EPIC analyses support an association between height and overall non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma among women and suggest heterogeneous subtype associations. This is one of the first prospective studies focusing on central adiposity and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma subtypes
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18835833
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; lung cancer ; SUPPORT ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; HETEROCYCLIC AMINES ; ASSOCIATION ; WOMEN ; FISH ; DIET ; FAT ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; meat ; CALIBRATION ; DIETARY HABITS ; RECALLS ; HEME IRON ; MUTAGENS
    Abstract: Evidence from case-control studies, but less so from cohort studies, suggests a positive association between meat intake and risk of lung cancer. Therefore, this association was evaluated in the frame of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, EPIC. Data from 478,021 participants, recruited from 10 European countries, who completed a dietary questionnaire in 1992-2000 were evaluated; 1,822 incident primary lung cancer cases were included in the present evaluation. Relative risk estimates were calculated for categories of meat intake using multi-variably adjusted Cox proportional hazard models. In addition, the continuous intake variables were calibrated by means of 24-h diet recall data to account for part of the measurement error. There were no consistent associations between meat consumption and the risk of lung cancer. Neither red meat (RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.89-1.27 per 50 g intake/day; calibrated model) nor processed meat (RR = 1.13, 95% CI 0.95-1.34 per 50 g/day; calibrated model) was significantly related to an increased risk of lung cancer. Also, consumption of white meat and fish was not associated with the risk of lung cancer. These findings do not support the hypothesis that a high intake of red and processed meat is a risk factor for lung cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21479828
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; LUNG ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; incidence ; MORTALITY ; NEW-YORK ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; MEN ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; POPULATIONS ; DIET ; DIETARY ; NETHERLANDS ; case-control studies ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; EPIC study ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; SMOKERS ; VEGETABLES ; EUROPE ; FOOD ; RELATIVE RISK ; cancer,diet,epidemiology,fruits,vegetables,lung cancer,smoking ; FLAVONOIDS ; NONSMOKING WOMEN
    Abstract: Intake of fruits and vegetables is thought to protect against the development of lung cancer. However, some recent cohort and case-control studies have shown no protective effect. We have assessed the relation between fruit and vegetable intake and lung cancer incidence in the large prospective investigation on diet and cancer, the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We studied data from 478,021 individuals that took part in the EPIC study, who were recruited from 10 European countries and who completed a dietary questionnaire during 1992-1998. Follow-up was to December 1998 or 1999, but for some centres with active follow-up to June 2002. During follow-up, 1,074 participants were reported to have developed lung cancer, of whom 860 were eligible for our analysis. We used the Cox proportional hazard model to determine the effect of fruit and vegetable intake on the incidence of lung cancer. We paid particular attention to adjustment for smoking. Relative risk estimates were obtained using fruit and vegetable intake categorised by sex-specific, cohort-wide quintiles. After adjustment for age, smoking, height, weight and gender, there was a significant inverse association between fruit consumption and lung cancer risk: the hazard ratio for the highest quintile of consumption relative to the lowest being 0.60 (95% Confidence Interval 0.46-0.78), p for trend 0.0099. The association was strongest in the Northern Europe centres, and among current smokers at baseline, and was strengthened when the 293 lung cancers diagnosed in the first 2 years of follow-up were excluded from the analysis. There was no association between vegetable consumption or vegetable subtypes and lung cancer risk. The findings from this analysis can be regarded as re-enforcing recommendations with regard to enhanced fruit consumption for populations. However, the effect is likely to be small compared to smoking cessation. (C) 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14639614
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