Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • EPIC  (16)
Collection
Keywords
  • 1
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; TRIAL ; hormone ; HEALTH ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; OBESITY ; risk factors ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; RISK FACTOR ; EPIC ; EPIC study ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; MASS INDEX ; PH ; WEIGHT ; body weight ; fat distribution ; HEIGHT ; ADIPOSITY ; breast neoplasm ; HORMONE-REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; METAANALYSIS
    Abstract: The evidence for anthropometric factors influencing breast cancer risk is accumulating, but uncertainties remain concerning the role of fat distribution and potential effect modifiers. We used data from 73,542 premenopausal and 103,344 postmenopausal women from 9 European countries, taking part in the EPIC study. RRs from Cox regression models were calculated, using measured height, weight, BMI and waist and hip circumferences; categorized by cohort wide quintiles; and expressed as continuous variables, adjusted for study center, age and other risk factors. During 4.7 years of follow-up, 1,879 incident invasive breast cancers were identified. In postmenopausal women, current HRT modified the body size-breast cancer association. Among nonusers, weight, BMI and hip circumference were positively associated with breast cancer risk (all P-trend less than or equal to 0.002); obese women (BMI 〉 30) had a 31% excess risk compared to women with BMI 〈 25. Among HRT users, body measures were inversely but nonsignificantly associated with breast cancer. Excess breast cancer risk with HRT was particularly evident among lean women. Pooled RRs per height increment of 5 cm were 1.05 (95% CI 1.00-1.16) in premenopausal and 1.10 (95% CI 1.05-1.16) in postmenopausal women. Among premenopausal women, hip circumference was the only other measure significantly related to breast cancer (P-trend = 0.03), after accounting for BMI. In postmenopausal women not taking exogenous hormones, general obesity is a significant predictor of breast cancer, while abdominal fat assessed as waist-hip ratio or waist circumference was not related to excess risk when adjusted for BMI. Among premenopausal women, weight and BMI showed nonsignificant inverse associations with breast cancer. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15252848
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; IMMUNOASSAYS ; immunoassay ; LIFE-STYLE FACTORS ; dehydroepiandrosterone ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; EPIC PROJECT ; LEVEL ; methods ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM-LEVELS ; alcohol consumption ; PREMENOPAUSAL ; prospective ; BINDING GLOBULIN ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; intake ; steroids ; HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS ; alcohol intake ; ESTRADIOL LEVELS ; post-menopausal women ; pre-menopausal ; SERUM HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS ; sex steroids
    Abstract: Objective Women with a moderate intake of alcohol have higher concentrations of sex steroids in serum, and higher risk of developing breast cancer, compared to non-drinkers. In the present study, we investigate the relationships between alcohol consumption and serum levels of sex steroids and sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in 790 pre- and 1,291 post-menopausal women, who were part of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods Serum levels of testosterone (T), androstenedione (Delta(4)), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), estrone (E-1), estradiol (E-2) and SHBG were measured by direct immunoassays. Free T (fT) and free E-2 (fE(2)) were calculated according to mass action laws. Current alcohol intake exposure to alcohol was assessed from dietary questionnaires. Results Pre-menopausal women who consumed more than 25 g/day of alcohol had about 30% higher DHEAS, T and fT, 20% higher Delta(4) and about 40% higher E-1, concentrations compared to women who were non-consumers. E-2, fE(2) and SHBG concentrations showed no association with current alcohol intake. In post-menopausal women, DHEAS, fT, T, Delta(4), and E-1 concentrations were between 10% and 20% higher in women who consumed more than 25 g/day of alcohol compared to non-consumers. E-2 or fE(2) were not associated with alcohol intake at all. SHBG levels were about 15% lower in alcohol consumers compared to non-consumers. Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis of an influence of alcohol intake on sex hormone concentrations in blood
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16933054
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; Germany ; RISK ; METABOLISM ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; DESIGN ; NUMBER ; AGE ; WOMEN ; REPRODUCIBILITY ; etiology ; cancer risk ; EPIC ; nutrition ; ESTRADIOL ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM ; ONCOLOGY ; REGRESSION ; ESTROGEN ; LEVEL ; analysis ; PHASE ; PREMENOPAUSAL ; TESTOSTERONE ; prospective ; STEROID-HORMONES ; VARIABLES ; CANCER-RISK ; BINDING GLOBULIN ; ENGLAND ; steroids ; SEX-HORMONES ; postmenopausal ; androgens ; FREE TESTOSTERONE ; ESTROGENS
    Abstract: Epidemiological data show that reproductive and hormonal factors are involved in the etiology of endometrial cancer, but there is little data on the association with endogenous sex hormone levels. We analyzed the association between prediagnostic serum concentrations of sex steroids and endometrial cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition using a nested case-control design of 247 incident endometrial cancer cases and 481 controls, matched on center, menopausal status, age, variables relating to blood collection, and, for premenopausal women, phase of menstrual cycle. Using conditional regression analysis, endometrial cancer risk among postmenopausal women was positively associated with increasing levels of total testosterone, free testosterone, estrone, total estradiol, and free estradiol. The odds ratios (ORs) for the highest versus lowest tertile were 2.66 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.50-4.72; P=0.002 for a continuous linear trend) for estrone, 2.07 (95% Cl 1.20-3.60; P=0.001) for estradiol, and 1.66 (95% Cl 0.98-2.82; P=0.001) for free estradiol. For total and free testosterone, ORs for the highest versus lowest tertile were 1.44 (95% Cl 0.88-2.36; P=0.05) and 2.05 (95% Cl 1.23-3.42; P=0.005) respectively. Androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate were not associated with risk. Sex hormone-binding globulin was significantly inversely associated with risk (OR for the highest versus lowest tertile was 0.57, 95% Cl 0.34-0.95; P=0.004). In premenopausal women, serum sex hormone concentrations were not clearly associated with endometrial cancer risk, but numbers were too small to draw firm conclusions. In conclusion, relatively high blood concentrations of estrogens and free testosterone are associated with an increased endometrial cancer risk in postmenopausal women
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18509001
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; PROSTATE ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; RISK ; CELL-LINES ; ASSOCIATION ; ALPHA ; NO ; STAGE ; TRIAL ; prevention ; DESIGN ; DIFFERENCE ; PLASMA ; MEN ; smoking ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; MULTIVARIATE ; case-control studies ; PREDICTORS ; EPIC ; nutrition ; NESTED CASE-CONTROL ; RELATIVE RISK ; VITAMIN-E ; case-control study ; GRADE ; SUPPLEMENTATION ; USA ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; ENGLAND ; SUBSEQUENT RISK ; DIETARY SELENIUM ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; SERUM SELENIUM
    Abstract: Background: Some evidence indicates that a low selenium intake may be associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasma selenium concentration with subsequent prostate cancer risk and to examine this association by stage and grade of disease and other factors. Design: A nested case-control study was performed among men in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The association between plasma selenium concentration and prostate cancer risk was assessed in 959 men with incident prostate cancer and 1059 matched controls. Results: Overall, plasma selenium concentration was not associated with prostate cancer risk; the multivariate relative risk for men in the highest fifth of selenium concentration compared with the lowest fifth was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.70, 1.31; P for trend = 0.25). There were no significant differences in the association of plasma selenium with risk when analyzed by stage or grade of disease. Similarly, the association of selenium with risk did not differ by smoking status or by plasma alpha- or gamma-tocopherol concentration. Conclusion: Plasma selenium concentration was not associated with prostate cancer risk in this large cohort of European men. Am J Clin Nutr 2008; 88:1567-75
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19064517
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; HISTORY ; RISK ; TIME ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; smoking ; cancer risk ; ethanol ; NETHERLANDS ; ALCOHOL ; PROJECT ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; pancreatic cancer ; LIFE-STYLE FACTORS ; pancreas ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; WEIGHT ; DIETARY-INTAKE MEASUREMENTS ; BEER ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; MALE SMOKERS ; BEVERAGE CONSUMPTION ; COFFEE CONSUMPTION
    Abstract: To examine the association of baseline and lifetime ethanol intake with cancer of the pancreas in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Included in this analysis were 478,400 subjects, of whom detailed information on the intake of alcoholic beverages at baseline and over lifetime was collected between 1992 and 2000. During a median follow-up time of 8.9 years, 555 non-endocrine pancreatic cancer cases were observed. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association of ethanol intake at recruitment and average lifetime ethanol intake and pancreatic cancer adjusting for smoking, height, weight, and history of diabetes. Overall, neither ethanol intake at recruitment (relative risk (RR) = 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69-1.27 comparing 30+ g/d vs. 0.1-4.9 g/d) nor average lifetime ethanol intake (RR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.65-1.39) was associated with pancreatic cancer risk. High lifetime ethanol intake from spirits/liquor at recruitment tended to be associated with a higher risk (RR = 1.40, 95% CI 0.93-2.10 comparing 10+ g/d vs. 0.1-4.9 g/d), but no associations were observed for wine and beer consumption. These results suggest no association of alcohol consumption with the risk of pancreatic cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19145468
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; RISK ; INFECTION ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; HEALTH ; MEN ; COUNTRIES ; DIET ; NETHERLANDS ; STOMACH ; adenocarcinoma ; EPIC ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; physical activity ; ONCOLOGY ; POPULATION-BASED COHORT ; SCALE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; METAANALYSIS ; SUBTYPES ; prospective ; CANCERS ; VARIABLES ; Helicobacter pylori ; stomach cancer ; BODY-MASS ; tumours ; gastric adenocarcinoma ; Type ; EURGAST ; REGISTER ; Oesophagus cancer
    Abstract: To analyse the association between types of physical activity (occupational, recreational and household, vigorous and overall) and risk of primary oesophageal (OAC) or gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC). From nine European countries, 420,449 participants were recruited between 1991 and 2000 and followed-up for a mean of 8.8 years to register incident GAC and OAC. Information on physical activity (PA), diet, lifestyle and health-related variables was obtained at baseline. Helicobacter pylori infection status was considered in a subset of 1,211 participants. Analyses were repeated by tumour site (cardia/non-cardia) and histological type (intestinal/diffuse). During the follow-up, 410 GAC and 80 OAC occurred. A lower risk of overall and non-cardia GAC was found for increasing levels of a PA index which combined occupational PA with weekly time spent in sports and cycling. The hazard ratio (HR) of GAC was 0.69, 95% CI: 0.50-0.94, for the comparison between active and inactive participants according to the PA index (HR = 0.44, 95% CI:0.26-0.74, for non-cardia GAC). No effect was found for cardia tumours or histological subtypes of GAC. PA of any kind was not associated with OAC. Overall and distal (non-cardia) gastric tumours were inversely associated with time spent on cycling and sports and a total PA index. No association was found for any type of PA and risk of cardia cancers of the stomach
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20052611
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; BLOOD ; LUNG ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; RISK ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; EPIC ; nutrition ; molecular epidemiology ; physical activity ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; biomarker ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; NEVER SMOKERS ; BLOOD GLUTATHIONE CONCENTRATIONS ; BULKY DNA-ADDUCTS ; EX-SMOKERS ; FORMER SMOKERS ; LIFE HABITS ; SMOKING-RELATED DISEASE
    Abstract: The association between physical activity, potential intermediate biomarkers and lung cancer risk was investigated in a study of 230 cases and 648 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer and Nutrition. Data on white blood cell aromatic-DNA adducts by 〈SU32〈/SUP-post-labelling and glutathione (GSH) in red blood cells were available from a subset of cases and controls. Compared with the first quartile, the fourth quartile of recreational physical activity was associated with a lower lung cancer risk (odds ratio (OR) 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.35-0.90), higher GSH levels (+1.87 mu mol GSH g〈SU-1〈/SU haemoglobin, p = 0.04) but not with the presence of high levels of adducts (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.38-2.86). Despite being associated with recreational physical activity, in these small-scale pilot analyses GSH levels were not associated with lung cancer risk (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.84-1.07 per unit increase in GSH levels). Household and occupational activity was not associated with lung cancer risk or biomarker levels.〈/
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20050820
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; DNA adducts ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; DNA ; BIOMARKERS ; colon ; RATS ; CONTRAST ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; BLADDER-CANCER ; cancer risk ; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS ; COLON-CANCER ; MULTIVARIATE ; ADDUCTS ; CARCINOGENS ; DIET ; DIETARY ; ALCOHOL ; EPIC ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; FOOD ; GUIDELINES ; VITAMIN-E ; DNA-ADDUCTS ; REGRESSION ; air pollution ; prospective studies ; N-NITROSAMINES ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; analysis ; prospective ; prospective study ; correlation ; BMI ; CANCER-RISK ; ENGLAND ; non-smokers ; AMINE ; gastrointestinal ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; fibre intake ; haemoglobin adducts ; RESISTANT STARCH
    Abstract: In contrast to some extensively examined food mutagens, for example, aflatoxins, N-nitrosamines and heterocyclic amines, some other food contaminants, in particular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and other aromatic compounds, have received less attention. Therefore, exploring the relationships between dietary habits and the levels of biomarkers related to exposure to aromatic compounds is highly relevant. We have investigated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort the association between dietary items (food groups and nutrients) and aromatic DNA adducts and 4-aminobiphenyl-Hb adducts. Both types of adducts are biomarkers of carcinogen exposure and possibly of cancer risk, and were measured, respectively, in leucocytes and erythrocytes of 1086 (DNA adducts) and 190 (Hb adducts) non-smokers. An inverse. statistically significant, association has been found between DNA adduct levels and dietary fibre intake (P=0.02), vitamin E (P =0.04) and alcohol (P=0.03) but not with other nutrients or food groups. Also, an inverse association between fibre and fruit intake, and BMI and 4-aminobiphenyl-Hb adducts (P=0.03, 0.04, and 0.03 respectively) was observed. After multivariate regression analysis these inverse correlations remained statistically significant, except for the correlation adducts v. fruit intake. The present study suggests that fibre intake in the usual range can modify the level of DNA or Hb aromatic adducts, but Such role seems to be quantitatively modest. Fibres could reduce the formation of DNA adducts in different manners, by diluting potential food mutagens and carcinogens in the gastrointestinal tract, by speeding their transit through the colon and by binding carcinogenic substances
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18275627
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; carcinoma ; CELL ; Germany ; human ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; SUPPORT ; COHORT ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; RISKS ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; risk factors ; COUNTRIES ; UNITED-STATES ; BLOOD-PRESSURE ; HYPERTENSION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; RELATIVE RISK ; CELL CARCINOMA ; renal cell carcinoma ; INCREASE ; USA ; RISK-FACTOR ; KIDNEY CANCER ; INCREASES ; ANTIHYPERTENSIVE MEDICATION ; antihypertensive agents ; DIURETICS ; FERRIC NITRILOTRIACETATE ; kidney neoplasms ; RISING INCIDENCE
    Abstract: Elevated blood pressure has been implicated as a risk factor for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but prospective studies were confined to men and did not consider the effect of antihypertensive medication. The authors examined the relation among blood pressure, antihypertensive medication, and RCC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Blood pressure was measured in 296,638 women and men, recruited in eight European countries during 1992-1998, 254,935 of whom provided information on antihypertensive medication. During a mean follow-up of 6.2 years, 250 cases of RCC were identified. Blood pressure was independently associated with risk of RCC. The relative risks for the highest versus the lowest category of systolic (〉= 160 mmHg vs. 〈 120 mmHg) and diastolic (〉= 100 mmHg vs. 〈 80 mmHg) blood pressures were 2.48 (95% confidence interval: 1.53, 4.02) and 2.34 (95% confidence interval: 1.54, 3.55). Risk estimates did not significantly differ according to sex or use of antihypertensive medication. Individuals taking antihypertensive drugs were not at a significantly increased risk unless blood pressure was poorly controlled. These results support the hypothesis that hypertension, rather than its medications, increases the risk of RCC in both sexes, while effective blood pressure control may lower the risk
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18048375
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; proliferation ; BLOOD ; CELL ; CELL-PROLIFERATION ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; colon ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; resistance ; NUMBER ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; OBESITY ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; RATES ; cancer risk ; BINDING-PROTEINS ; DIET ; case-control studies ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; EPIC ; nutrition ; FACTOR-I ; REGRESSION-MODELS ; physical activity ; BINDING PROTEIN ; insulin ; SERUM ; IGF-I ; ONCOLOGY ; BINDING-PROTEIN ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; secretion ; BODY-SIZE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; case control studies ; pancreatic ; BLOOD-GLUCOSE ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; rectum ; USA ; prospective ; rectal cancer ; prospective study ; CANCERS ; CANCER-RISK ; C-PEPTIDE ; IGFBP-1 ; colorectal ; BINDING PROTEINS ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; IGFBP-2 ; FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN-1 ; IGF ; insulin resistance ; GROWTH-FACTOR (IGF)-I
    Abstract: Western style diets and lifestyles are associated with increasing rates of obesity, diabetes and insulin resistance. Higher circulating insulin levels may modulate cell proliferation and apoptosis either directly or indirectly by increasing the bioactivity of IGF-I and decreasing the bioactivity of some of its binding proteins. The objective of this study was to determine the association of increasing levels of serum C-peptide, a biomarker of pancreatic insulin secretion, and IGF binding proteins (IGFBP) -1 and -2 with colorectal cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a large cohort involving 10 Western European countries. A total of 1,078 colorectal cancer cases were matched (age, date of blood donation, fasting status, gender, study center) to an equal number of control subjects. Relative cancer risks were estimated using conditional logistic regression models. Serum C-peptide concentration was positively associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk for the highest versus the lowest quintile (OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.16-2.09, p(trend) 〈 0.01), which was slightly attenuated after adjustment for BMI and physical activity (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.00-1.88, p(trend) = 0.10). When stratified by anatomical site, the cancer risk was stronger in the colon (OR 1.67, 95% CI = 1.14-2.46, p(trend) 〈 0.01) than in the rectum (OR 1.42, 95% CI = 0.90-2.25, p(trend) = 0.35). The cancer risk estimates were not heterogeneous by gender or fasting status. No clear colorectal cancer risk associations were observed for IGFBP-1 or -2. This large prospective study confirms that hyperinsulinemia, as determined by C-peptide levels, is associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk. (C) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17372899
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...