Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • DATABASE  (8)
  • ESTROGEN  (8)
  • 1
    Keywords: RISK ; MELANOMA ; DATABASE ; MUTATIONS ; CANCER RISKS ; AUSTRALIA ; INCIDENCE RATES ; SPOUSES
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12873883
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG-CANCER ; RISK ; SITES ; TIME ; SKIN ; lifestyle ; WOMEN ; risk factors ; MELANOMA ; DATABASE ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; ATTRIBUTABLE RISKS ; CARCINOID-TUMORS ; causes of cancer ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; environmental risks ; EPSTEIN-BARR-VIRUS ; LIFE-STYLE ; sociol factors ; SWEDISH POPULATION
    Abstract: It is well known that certain cancers have shown clustering in socioeconomic groups, but limited data are available on recent results and time trends in such clustering. We determined standardized incidence ratios (SIR) for cancer, adjusted for age, period, region, parity and age at first childbirth among men and women in 6 socioeconomic groups based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. Persons had to be identified with the same socioeconomic status in the census of years 1960 and 1970, or of years 1960, 1970 and 1980; the comparison group was all people according to the same censuses. Cancers were followed from years 1970 to 1998 or from 1980 to 1998. Both increased and decreased SIRs were found, and a consistent pattern emerged, although the overall SIRs for cancer did not differ much, the lowest being for farmers (0.8S) and the highest for professional men (1.07) and women (1.11). At individual sites, manual workers were at risk of tobacco-, alcohol- and occupation- and human papilloma virus-related cancers and at a decreased risk at most other cancers. Manual workers and farmers showed an excess of stomach cancer; professionals had an excess of melanoma and squamous cell skin cancer. Male and female SIRs correlated highly for manual and blue-collar workers and for professionals. The overall population- attributable fraction for selected sites was 16.7% for men and 10.9% for women and it was highest, over 50%, for lung cancer in both genders
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12740920
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; NEW-YORK ; RISK ; SKIN ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; IN-SITU ; RATES ; MELANOMA ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; NATIONWIDE ; CUTANEOUS MELANOMA ; OCULAR MELANOMA ; FAMILY-CANCER DATABASE ; 2ND PRIMARY CANCERS ; MALIGNANT- MELANOMA
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELL ; Germany ; LUNG ; neoplasms ; PROSTATE ; COMMON ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; DISEASE ; HISTORY ; incidence ; NEW-YORK ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; SITES ; renal ; SKIN ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; BREAST-CANCER ; AGE ; genetics ; etiology ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; leukemia ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; SIR ; familial risk ; NATIONWIDE ; ATTRIBUTABLE RISKS ; FAMILY-CANCER DATABASE ; NONPOLYPOSIS COLORECTAL-CANCER ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; GUIDELINES ; familial cancers,heritable cancer,clinical counseling,familial risk ; GENOMIC MEDICINE ; HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; TESTICULAR CANCER
    Abstract: Familial risks for cancer are important for clinical counseling and understanding cancer etiology. Medically verified data on familial risks have not been available for all types of cancer. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes all Swedes born in 1932 and later (0-to 68-year-old offspring) with their parents, totaling over 10.2 million individuals. Cancer cases were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry up to year 2000. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence limits (Cl) were calculated for age-specific familial risk in offspring by an exact proband status. The familial risks for offspring cancer were increased at 24/25 sites from concordant cancer in only the parent, at 20/21 sites from a sibling proband and at 12/12 sites from a parent and sibling proband. The highest SIRs by parent were for Hodgkin's disease (4.88) and testicular (4.26), non-medullary thyroid (3.26), ovarian (3.15) and esophageal (3.14) cancer and for multiple myeloma (3.33). When a sibling was affected, even prostate, renal, squamous cell skin, endocrine, gastric and lung cancer and leukemia showed SIRs in excess of 3.00. The highest cumulative risks were found for familial breast (5.5%) and prostate (4.2%) cancers. We identified reliable familial risks for 24 common neoplasms, most of which lack guidelines for clinical counseling or action level. If, for example, a familial SIR of 2.2 would be use as an action level, counseling would be needed for most cancers at some diagnostic age groups. The present data provide the basis for clinical counseling. (C) 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14618624
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Keywords: COHORT ; VARIANTS ; WOMEN ; HEIGHT ; METAANALYSIS ; bias ; ESTROGEN ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; PROGESTERONE-RECEPTOR STATUS ; INOSITOL POLYPHOSPHATES
    Abstract: A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (p(int)) 〈1.1 x 10(-3). None of the observed interactions was significant after accounting for multiple testing. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability was used to rank the findings, which indicated three interactions as being noteworthy at 1% prior probability of interaction. SNP rs6828523 was associated with increased ER-negative BC risk in women 170 cm (OR = 1.22, p = 0.017), but inversely associated with ER-negative BC risk in women 〈160 cm (OR = 0.83, p = 0.039, p(int) = 1.9 x 10(-4)). The inverse association between rs4808801 and overall BC risk was stronger for women who had had four or more pregnancies (OR = 0.85, p = 2.0 x 10(-4)), and absent in women who had had just one (OR = 0.96, p = 0.19, p(int) = 6.1 x 10(-4)). SNP rs11242675 was inversely associated with overall BC risk in never/former smokers (OR = 0.93, p = 2.8 x 10(-5)), but no association was observed in current smokers (OR = 1.07, p = 0.14, p(int) = 3.4 x 10(-4)). In conclusion, recently identified BC susceptibility loci are not strongly modified by established risk factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies. What's new? The recent discovery of 47 susceptibility loci associated with all or estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer provided new opportunities for genetic risk prediction but it remained unclear how exposure levels of environmental (non-genetic) risk factors influenced the risk assessment. In this gene-environment study, the international team examined interactions between the single nucleotide polymorphisms and 13 established environmental risk factors including parity, height and alcohol consumption. Notably, relative risks of breast cancer associated with the susceptibility loci were not strongly modified by environmental risk factors, a finding that, if confirmed, has important implications for the risk assessment in breast cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25227710
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Keywords: RISK ; BRCA1 ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; METAANALYSIS ; ESTROGEN ; ALLELES ; CHEK2-ASTERISK-1100DELC ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; COMMON VARIANTS ; GENOTYPE IMPUTATION
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining approximately 14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls together with 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 211,155-marker custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to women of European ancestry. We generated genotypes for more than 11 million SNPs by imputation using the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel, and we identified 15 new loci associated with breast cancer at P 〈 5 x 10(-8). Combining association analysis with ChIP-seq chromatin binding data in mammary cell lines and ChIA-PET chromatin interaction data from ENCODE, we identified likely target genes in two regions: SETBP1 at 18q12.3 and RNF115 and PDZK1 at 1q21.1. One association appears to be driven by an amino acid substitution encoded in EXO1.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25751625
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; PROSTATE ; DISEASE ; HISTORY ; incidence ; NEW-YORK ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; SITES ; GENE ; GENES ; PATIENT ; kidney ; FAMILY ; MEMBER ; MEMBERS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST-CANCER ; etiology ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; SIR ; familial risk ; NATIONWIDE ; FAMILY-CANCER DATABASE ; GUIDELINES ; GENOMIC MEDICINE ; TESTICULAR CANCER ; CELL TUMORS ; familial cancers,heritable cancer,clinical counseling,urology ; LINDAU-DISEASE
    Abstract: Familial risks for cancer are important for clinical counseling and understanding cancer etiology. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes all Swedes born in 1932 and later (0 to 68-year-old offspring) with their parents, totaling over 10.2 million individuals. Urological cancer cases were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry up to year 2000. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence limits (CI) were calculated for age-specific familial risk in offspring by an exact proband status. The familial risks for offspring cancer were increased at all urological sites from concordant cancer in the parent and in a sibling proband. The highest SIRs by parent were for testicular and prostate cancer (4.26 and 2.45). When a sibling was affected, even kidney cancer (4.74) showed a high SIR. For kidney cancers, and also for prostate and testicular cancers, the SIRs were higher among siblings than among offspring and parents, which may indicate the involvement of recessive effects. Family members of patients with prostate cancer or von Hippel Lindau disease can expect organized clinical counseling, but family members of patients with other urological cancers are probably not counseled. Guidelines for clinical counseling or action level should be developed for all urological cancers because of the established familial risks. Urological cancers also offer a challenge to molecular geneticists attempting to identify the susceptibility genes underlying the familial clustering
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14615900
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; tumor ; CELL ; RISK ; PROTEIN ; transcription ; DIFFERENTIATION ; TUMORS ; TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ; MARKER ; REDUCTION ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; BRCA1 ; WOMEN ; MUTATION ; SNP ; MARKERS ; cancer risk ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; PROGENITOR CELLS ; CARRIERS ; case-control studies ; PROJECT ; MORPHOGENESIS ; ER ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR ; SINGLE ; case control study ; case-control study ; BRCA2 ; TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR ; VARIANT ; MAMMARY-GLAND ; MUTATION CARRIERS ; ESTROGEN ; biomarker ; estrogen receptor ; pooled analysis ; USA ; CANCER-RISK ; CONSORTIUM ; tumor suppressor ; 3 ; Genetic ; TRANSCRIPTION-FACTOR ; BRCA1 and BRCA2 ; GATA3 ; LUMINAL CELL FATE
    Abstract: GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA3) is a transcription factor that is crucial to mammary gland morphogenesis and differentiation of progenitor cells, and has been suggested to have a tumor suppressor function. The rs570613 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in intron 4 of GATA3 was previously found to be associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility project and in pooled analysis of two case-control studies from Norway and Poland (P (trend) = 0.004), with some evidence for a stronger association with estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumours [Garcia-Closas M et al. (2007) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 16:2269-2275]. We genotyped GATA3 rs570613 in 6,388 cases and 4,995 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and 5,617 BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). We found no association between this SNP and breast cancer risk in BCAC cases overall (ORper-allele = 1.00, 95% CI 0.94-1.05), in ER negative BCAC cases (ORper-allele = 1.02, 95% CI 0.91-1.13), in BRCA1 mutation carriers RRper-allele = 0.99, 95% CI 0.90-1.09) or BRCA2 mutation carriers (RRper-allele = 0.93, 95% CI 0.80-1.07). We conclude that there is no evidence that either GATA3 rs570613, or any variant in strong linkage disequilibrium with it, is associated with breast cancer risk in women
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19082709
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Keywords: POLYMORPHISMS ; HEALTH ; BREAST-CANCER RISK ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; TAMOXIFEN ; ESTROGEN ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; PHOSPHOLIPASE C-GAMMA-2 ; SUSCEPTIBILITY VARIANTS ; PROLACTIN LEVELS
    Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Mammographic density is an established breast cancer risk factor with a strong genetic component and can be increased in women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT). Here, we aimed to identify genetic variants that may modify the association between MHT use and mammographic density. METHODS: The study comprised 6,298 postmenopausal women from the Mayo Mammography Health Study and nine studies included in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We selected for evaluation 1327 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) showing the lowest P-values for interaction (P int) in a meta-analysis of genome-wide gene-environment interaction studies with MHT use on risk of breast cancer, 2541 SNPs in candidate genes (AKR1C4, CYP1A1-CYP1A2, CYP1B1, ESR2, PPARG, PRL, SULT1A1-SULT1A2 and TNF) and ten SNPs (AREG-rs10034692, PRDM6-rs186749, ESR1-rs12665607, ZNF365-rs10995190, 8p11.23-rs7816345, LSP1-rs3817198, IGF1-rs703556, 12q24-rs1265507, TMEM184B-rs7289126, and SGSM3-rs17001868) associated with mammographic density in genome-wide studies. We used multiple linear regression models adjusted for potential confounders to evaluate interactions between SNPs and current use of MHT on mammographic density. RESULTS: No significant interactions were identified after adjustment for multiple testing. The strongest SNP-MHT interaction (unadjusted P int 〈0.0004) was observed with rs9358531 6.5kb 5' of PRL. Furthermore, three SNPs in PLCG2 that had previously been shown to modify the association of MHT use with breast cancer risk were found to modify also the association of MHT use with mammographic density (unadjusted P int 〈0.002), but solely among cases (unadjusted P int SNPxMHTxcase-status 〈0.02). CONCLUSIONS: The study identified potential interactions on mammographic density between current use of MHT and SNPs near PRL and in PLCG2, which require confirmation. Given the moderate size of the interactions observed, larger studies are needed to identify genetic modifiers of the association of MHT use with mammographic density.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26275715
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; neoplasms ; RISK ; RISKS ; TIME ; FAMILY ; tumour ; SKIN ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; IN-SITU ; MELANOMA ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; SIR ; CUTANEOUS MELANOMA ; Bowen's disease ; in situ carcinoma ; multiple skin cancer ; multiple skin cancers ; NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION-REPAIR ; OCULAR MELANOMA ; PRIMARY CANCERS
    Abstract: We used the updated nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to examine familial risks in data from 1961 to 1998 on 1252 invasive and 2474 in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin among offspring, and over 10 times more among parents. In 259 families a parent and an offspring had skin SCC. The familial standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) were 2.72 for invasive and 2.40 for in situ skin cancers in offspring. Multiple skin cancers in parents were associated with increased SIRs for invasive SCC in offspring, being 2.55 for one and up to 14.93 for two invasive and two in situ cancers in parents; the corresponding in situ SCC risks were 2.28 and 7.49. The population attributable fraction for any familial skin SCC, invasive or in situ, was 4.1%. Melanoma was the only discordant tumour that was associated with invasive and in situ skin SCC. These results provide evidence that there is an underlying hereditary susceptibility for at least a part of the familial clustering for skin SCC. (C) 2003 Cancer Research UK
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12778064
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...