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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; COMBINATION ; LUNG ; MODEL ; MODELS ; TOXICITY ; CLASSIFICATION ; liver ; GENE ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; microarray ; validation ; QUALITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; PERFORMANCE ; gene expression ; MICROARRAY DATA ; HUMANS ; microarrays ; PREDICTION ; PROJECT ; FOLLICULAR LYMPHOMA ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; rodent ; neuroblastoma ; development ; methods ; GENE-EXPRESSION DATA ; DNA MICROARRAYS ; rodents ; RECOMMENDATIONS ; EXPRESSION DATA ; CONTROL MAQC PROJECT ; PUBLISHED MICROARRAY ; RISK-STRATIFICATION
    Abstract: Gene expression data from microarrays are being applied to predict preclinical and clinical endpoints, but the reliability of these predictions has not been established. In the MAQC-II project, 36 independent teams analyzed six microarray data sets to generate predictive models for classifying a sample with respect to one of 13 endpoints indicative of lung or liver toxicity in rodents, or of breast cancer, multiple myeloma or neuroblastoma in humans. In total, 〉30,000 models were built using many combinations of analytical methods. The teams generated predictive models without knowing the biological meaning of some of the endpoints and, to mimic clinical reality, tested the models on data that had not been used for training. We found that model performance depended largely on the endpoint and team proficiency and that different approaches generated models of similar performance. The conclusions and recommendations from MAQC-II should be useful for regulatory agencies, study committees and independent investigators that evaluate methods for global gene expression analysis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 2
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; tumor ; POPULATION ; chromosome ; LYMPHOCYTES ; OUTCOMES ; LOCUS ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; COMMON VARIANTS
    Abstract: Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2p36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49-2.19); P for trend=1.90 x 10(-9)). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24937182
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  • 3
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; screening ; DISEASE ; CDNA ; GENE ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; GENES ; HYBRIDIZATION ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; RNA ; TISSUE ; DNA ; MARKER ; DOMAIN ; BINDING ; BIOLOGY ; cell cycle ; CELL-CYCLE ; CYCLE ; SEQUENCE ; IN-SITU ; PATTERNS ; CHROMATIN ; gene expression ; IN-SITU HYBRIDIZATION ; MARKERS ; DATABASE ; DNA-BINDING ; XENOPUS ; PREDICTION ; epidermis ; FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS ; REGULATOR ; ENDOPLASMIC-RETICULUM ; EMBRYOS ; TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION ; embryogenesis ; CLUSTER ; clustering ; in situ hybridization ; molecular ; Xenopus laevis ; XENOPUS-LAEVIS ; EXPRESSED SEQUENCE TAGS ; SCREEN ; endoplasmic reticulum ; LAEVIS ; synexpression ; SYNEXPRESSION GROUP ; cluster analysis ; EXPRESSION PATTERNS ; GENE ONTOLOGY ; EXPRESSION PROFILES ; protein domain ; amphibian ; cDNA sequencing ; partial cDNA sequencing ; pattern formation ; regionalization
    Abstract: We have carried out a large-scale, semi-automated whole-mount in situ hybridization screen of 8369 cDNA clones in Xenopus laevis embryos. We confirm that differential gene expression is prevalent during embryogenesis since 24% of the clones are expressed nonubiquitously and 8% are organ or cell type specific marker genes. Sequence analysis and clustering yielded 723 unique genes displaying a differential expression pattern. Of these, 18% were already described in Xenopus, 47% have homologs and 35% are lacking significant sequence similarity in databases. Many of them encode known developmental regulators. We classified 363 of the 723 genes for which a Gene Ontology annotation for molecular function could be attributed and found 'DNA binding' and 'enzyme' the most represented terms. The most common protein domains encoded in these embryonic, differentially expressed genes are the homeobox and RNA Recognition Motif (RRM). Fifty-nine Putative orthologs of human disease genes, and 254 organ or cell specific marker genes were identified. Markers were found for nasal placode and archenteron roof, organs for which a specific marker was previously unavailable. Markers were also found for novel subdomains of various other organs. The tissues for which most markers were found are muscle and epidermis. Expression of cell cycle regulators fell in two classes, containing proliferation-promoting and anti-proliferative genes, respectively. We identified 66 new members of the BMP4, chromatin, endoplasmic reticulum, and karyopherin synexpression groups, thus providing a first glimpse of their probable cellular roles. Cluster analysis of tissues to measure tissue relatedness yielded some unorthodox affinities besides expectable lineage relationships. In conclusion, this study represents an atlas of gene expression patterns, which reveals embryonic regionalization, provides novel marker genes, and makes predictions about the functional role of unknown genes. (c) 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15763213
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  • 4
    Keywords: CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; Germany ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; RISK ; PROTEIN ; ASSOCIATION ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; VARIANTS ; PROMOTER ; SNP ; OBESITY ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; EPITHELIAL-CELLS ; cholesterol ; case-control studies ; BODY ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; SMALL-INTESTINE ; TYPE-2 ; INITIATION ; case-control study ; VARIANT ; INCREASE ; SNPs ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; BMI ; SUBSTITUTION ; type 2 diabetes ; LINKAGE-DISEQUILIBRIUM ; HUMAN CELL LINES ; ALA54THR POLYMORPHISM ; FATTY-ACID-BINDING ; PROTEIN-2 GENE ; PROMOTER POLYMORPHISMS ; ATCC STOCKS ; CODON-54 ; fatty acid-binding protein ; SEAP assay
    Abstract: Fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2) is a cytosolic protein expressed exclusively in epithelial cells of the small intestine. Some, albeit not conclusive, evidence indicates that the Thr-allele of FABP2 Ala54Thr polymorphism is associated with type 2 diabetes. More recently, common FABP2 promoter polymorphisms have shown association with postprandial increase of triglycerides, body composition and plasma lipid levels. Therefore, we reasoned that variants in the FABP2 promoter may also predispose to type 2 diabetes mellitus. In our Caucasian study population, we found three SNPs and three insertion-deletion polymorphisms that are in complete linkage disequilibrium defining promoter haplotype A and B within 1kb5' of the FABP2 initiation codon. Haplotype calculations indicated that the FABP2 promoter and Ala54Thr variants were strongly linked. Functional analysis of promoter fragments demonstrated that haplotype difference is caused by polymorphisms within 260 bp downstream of the FABP2 initiation codon. Using a prospective case-control study nested within the EPIC-Potsdam cohort of 192 incident type 2 diabetes cases and 384 sex-/age-matched controls, male subjects carrying the FABP2 haplotype B allele showed significantly decreased risk of type 2 diabetes when adjusted for BMI (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.28-0.87, p 〈 0.05) and additional covariates (OR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.22-0.81, p 〈 0.01). Further adjustment for the Ala54Thr polymorphism revealed an OR of 0.18 (95% CI 0.06-0.49, p 〈 0.001). Similarly, Ala/Ala homozygote males carrying the promoter haplotype B had decreased risk (0.33, 0.11-0.94, p 〈 0.05) of type 2 diabetes after stratification for the Ala54Thr polymorphism. FABP2 promoter haplotypes or genotype combinations defined by the promoter and Ala54Thr polymorphism were not associated with BMI, body fat, leptin, HbA(1c), total cholesterol or HDL. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the functional FABP2 promoter haplotype may contribute to type 2 diabetes in a sex-specific manner
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16718625
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  • 5
    Keywords: PEPTIDE ; RECEPTOR ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; COMMON ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; RISK ; SITE ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; RELEASE ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; ACID ; NO ; AGE ; MUTATION ; SNP ; OBESITY ; risk factors ; REGION ; REGIONS ; EPIC-GERMANY ; insulin ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; VARIANT ; ALLELE ; SNPs ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE ; AMINO-ACID ; interaction ; pancreatic ; GENOTYPE ; metabolic syndrome ; RISK-FACTOR ; cardiovascular disease ; EPIC-Potsdam ; DEPENDENT INSULINOTROPIC POLYPEPTIDE ; diabetes type 2 ; GASTRIC-INHIBITORY POLYPEPTIDE ; GIP receptor ; gluocose-dependent insulinotropic peptide
    Abstract: Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) stimulates insulin release via interaction with its pancreatic receptor (GIP receptor (GIPR)). GIP also acts as vasoactive protein. To investigate whether variations in GIP and GIPR genes are associated with risk factors of the metabolic syndrome we sequenced gene regions and identified two coding SNPs (GIP Ser103Gly, GIPR Glu354Gln) and one splice site SNP (GIP rs2291726) in 47 subjects. Interestingly, in silico analyses revealed that splice site SNP rs2291726 results in a truncated protein and classified GIPR variant Glu354Gln as a functional amino acid change. Association analyses were performed in a case-cohort study of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) nested in the EPIC-Potsdam cohort. No significant associations between incident CVD and GIP Ser103Gly and rs2291726 were found. For GIPR Glu354Gln, we obtained a nominal association of heterozygous minor allele carrier with CVD in a codominant model adjusted for BMI, sex, and age (OR: 0.67, Cl: 0.50-0.91,p = 0.01) or additional covariates of CVD (OR: 0.72, Cl: 0.52-0.97,p = 0.03). In conclusion, we identified a common splice site mutation (rs2291726) of the GIP gene which results in a truncated protein and provide preliminary evidence for an association of the heterozygous GIPR Glu354Gln genotype with CVD
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17624916
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  • 6
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; Germany ; segmentation ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; DIFFERENTIATION ; FAMILY ; DOMAIN ; MEMBER ; MEMBERS ; MOUSE ; CLOCK ; EMBRYO ; CONSERVATION ; XENOPUS ; DE-NOVO ; REPRESSION ; CHICKEN ; EMBRYOS ; MORPHOGENESIS ; NOTCH PATHWAY ; PARAXIAL MESODERM ; SOMITE SEGMENTATION ; SOMITOGENESIS
    Abstract: During somitogenesis, the cycling expression of members of the Notch signalling cascade is involved in a segmentation clock that regulates the periodic budding of somites in chicken, mouse, and zebrafish. In frog, genes with cycling expression in the presomitic mesoderm have not been reported. Here, we describe the expression of Xenopus esr9 and esr10, two new members of the Hairy/Enhancer of split related family of bHLH proteins. We show that they are expressed in a highly dynamic fashion, with their mRNA levels oscillating periodically in the presomitic mesoderm during somitogenesis. This dynamic expression is independent of de novo protein synthesis. Thus, expression of esr9 and esr10 is an indicator of the segmentation clock in the amphibian embryo. This confirms the evolutionary conservation of a molecular pathway involved in vertebrate segmentation clock
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12558606
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: The human lens is comprised largely of crystallin proteins assembled into a highly ordered, interactive macro-structure essential for lens transparency and refractive index. Any disruption of intra- or inter-protein interactions will alter this delicate structure, exposing hydrophobic surfaces, with consequent protein aggregation and cataract formation. Cataracts are the most common cause of blindness worldwide, affecting tens of millions of people, and currently the only treatment is surgical removal of cataractous lenses. The precise mechanisms by which lens proteins both prevent aggregation and maintain lens transparency are largely unknown. Lanosterol is an amphipathic molecule enriched in the lens. It is synthesized by lanosterol synthase (LSS) in a key cyclization reaction of a cholesterol synthesis pathway. Here we identify two distinct homozygous LSS missense mutations (W581R and G588S) in two families with extensive congenital cataracts. Both of these mutations affect highly conserved amino acid residues and impair key catalytic functions of LSS. Engineered expression of wild-type, but not mutant, LSS prevents intracellular protein aggregation of various cataract-causing mutant crystallins. Treatment by lanosterol, but not cholesterol, significantly decreased preformed protein aggregates both in vitro and in cell-transfection experiments. We further show that lanosterol treatment could reduce cataract severity and increase transparency in dissected rabbit cataractous lenses in vitro and cataract severity in vivo in dogs. Our study identifies lanosterol as a key molecule in the prevention of lens protein aggregation and points to a novel strategy for cataract prevention and treatment.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhao, Ling -- Chen, Xiang-Jun -- Zhu, Jie -- Xi, Yi-Bo -- Yang, Xu -- Hu, Li-Dan -- Ouyang, Hong -- Patel, Sherrina H -- Jin, Xin -- Lin, Danni -- Wu, Frances -- Flagg, Ken -- Cai, Huimin -- Li, Gen -- Cao, Guiqun -- Lin, Ying -- Chen, Daniel -- Wen, Cindy -- Chung, Christopher -- Wang, Yandong -- Qiu, Austin -- Yeh, Emily -- Wang, Wenqiu -- Hu, Xun -- Grob, Seanna -- Abagyan, Ruben -- Su, Zhiguang -- Tjondro, Harry Christianto -- Zhao, Xi-Juan -- Luo, Hongrong -- Hou, Rui -- Perry, J Jefferson P -- Gao, Weiwei -- Kozak, Igor -- Granet, David -- Li, Yingrui -- Sun, Xiaodong -- Wang, Jun -- Zhang, Liangfang -- Liu, Yizhi -- Yan, Yong-Bin -- Zhang, Kang -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 30;523(7562):607-11. doi: 10.1038/nature14650. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [3] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Membrane Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. ; 1] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [2] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China. ; State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] CapitalBio Genomics Co., Ltd., Dongguan 523808, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 20080, China. ; Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California 92521, USA. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ; Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 20080, China. ; Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [3] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [4] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [5] Veterans Administration Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200341" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Amyloid/chemistry/drug effects/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Cataract/congenital/*drug therapy/genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Cell Line ; Child ; Crystallins/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Dogs ; Female ; Humans ; Lanosterol/administration & dosage/*pharmacology/*therapeutic use ; Lens, Crystalline/drug effects/metabolism/pathology ; Male ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutant Proteins/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Pedigree ; Protein Aggregates/*drug effects ; Protein Aggregation, Pathological/*drug therapy/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2011-05-21
    Description: The transmission of information from DNA to RNA is a critical process. We compared RNA sequences from human B cells of 27 individuals to the corresponding DNA sequences from the same individuals and uncovered more than 10,000 exonic sites where the RNA sequences do not match that of the DNA. All 12 possible categories of discordances were observed. These differences were nonrandom as many sites were found in multiple individuals and in different cell types, including primary skin cells and brain tissues. Using mass spectrometry, we detected peptides that are translated from the discordant RNA sequences and thus do not correspond exactly to the DNA sequences. These widespread RNA-DNA differences in the human transcriptome provide a yet unexplored aspect of genome variation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3204392/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3204392/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Mingyao -- Wang, Isabel X -- Li, Yun -- Bruzel, Alan -- Richards, Allison L -- Toung, Jonathan M -- Cheung, Vivian G -- R01 HG005854/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG005854-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jul 1;333(6038):53-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1207018. Epub 2011 May 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21596952" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Aged ; Amino Acid Sequence ; B-Lymphocytes ; Base Sequence ; Cell Line ; Cerebral Cortex/cytology ; DNA/chemistry/*genetics ; Exons ; Expressed Sequence Tags ; Fibroblasts ; Gene Expression Profiling ; *Genetic Variation ; *Genome, Human ; Genotype ; Humans ; Mass Spectrometry ; Middle Aged ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Protein Biosynthesis ; Proteins/chemistry ; Proteome/chemistry ; RNA, Messenger/chemistry/*genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Sequence Analysis, RNA ; Skin/cytology ; Untranslated Regions
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-03-05
    Description: Recognition of modified histones by 'reader' proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of chromatin. H3K36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) is deposited onto the nucleosomes in the transcribed regions after RNA polymerase II elongation. In yeast, this mark in turn recruits epigenetic regulators to reset the chromatin to a relatively repressive state, thus suppressing cryptic transcription. However, much less is known about the role of H3K36me3 in transcription regulation in mammals. This is further complicated by the transcription-coupled incorporation of the histone variant H3.3 in gene bodies. Here we show that the candidate tumour suppressor ZMYND11 specifically recognizes H3K36me3 on H3.3 (H3.3K36me3) and regulates RNA polymerase II elongation. Structural studies show that in addition to the trimethyl-lysine binding by an aromatic cage within the PWWP domain, the H3.3-dependent recognition is mediated by the encapsulation of the H3.3-specific 'Ser 31' residue in a composite pocket formed by the tandem bromo-PWWP domains of ZMYND11. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing shows a genome-wide co-localization of ZMYND11 with H3K36me3 and H3.3 in gene bodies, and its occupancy requires the pre-deposition of H3.3K36me3. Although ZMYND11 is associated with highly expressed genes, it functions as an unconventional transcription co-repressor by modulating RNA polymerase II at the elongation stage. ZMYND11 is critical for the repression of a transcriptional program that is essential for tumour cell growth; low expression levels of ZMYND11 in breast cancer patients correlate with worse prognosis. Consistently, overexpression of ZMYND11 suppresses cancer cell growth in vitro and tumour formation in mice. Together, this study identifies ZMYND11 as an H3.3-specific reader of H3K36me3 that links the histone-variant-mediated transcription elongation control to tumour suppression.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wen, Hong -- Li, Yuanyuan -- Xi, Yuanxin -- Jiang, Shiming -- Stratton, Sabrina -- Peng, Danni -- Tanaka, Kaori -- Ren, Yongfeng -- Xia, Zheng -- Wu, Jun -- Li, Bing -- Barton, Michelle C -- Li, Wei -- Li, Haitao -- Shi, Xiaobing -- CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 10;508(7495):263-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13045. Epub 2014 Mar 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3]. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [3]. ; 1] Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2]. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Genes and Development Graduate Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Teaxs 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590075" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Breast Neoplasms/*genetics/metabolism/*pathology ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Chromatin/genetics/metabolism ; Co-Repressor Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disease-Free Survival ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Histones/chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Lysine/*metabolism ; Methylation ; Mice ; Mice, Nude ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Oncogenes/genetics ; Prognosis ; Protein Binding ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; RNA Polymerase II/*metabolism ; Substrate Specificity ; *Transcription Elongation, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2013-07-28
    Description: The essential bacterial protein FtsZ is a guanosine triphosphatase that self-assembles into a structure at the division site termed the "Z ring". During cytokinesis, the Z ring exerts a constrictive force on the membrane by using the chemical energy of guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis. However, the structural basis of this constriction remains unresolved. Here, we present the crystal structure of a guanosine diphosphate-bound Mycobacterium tuberculosis FtsZ protofilament, which exhibits a curved conformational state. The structure reveals a longitudinal interface that is important for function. The protofilament curvature highlights a hydrolysis-dependent conformational switch at the T3 loop that leads to longitudinal bending between subunits, which could generate sufficient force to drive cytokinesis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3816583/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3816583/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Ying -- Hsin, Jen -- Zhao, Lingyun -- Cheng, Yiwen -- Shang, Weina -- Huang, Kerwyn Casey -- Wang, Hong-Wei -- Ye, Sheng -- 1F32GM100677-01A1/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- DP2 OD006466/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP2OD006466/OD/NIH HHS/ -- F32 GM100677/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Jul 26;341(6144):392-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1239248.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Life Sciences Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 Zhejiang, P.R. China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23888039" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Bacterial Proteins/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Cell Membrane/physiology ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; *Cytokinesis ; Cytoskeletal Proteins/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Escherichia coli/chemistry ; Guanosine Diphosphate/chemistry/metabolism ; Guanosine Triphosphate/metabolism ; Hydrolysis ; Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Dynamics Simulation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mycobacterium tuberculosis/*chemistry/physiology ; Point Mutation ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein Subunits/chemistry/metabolism ; Staphylococcus aureus/chemistry
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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