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  • Amino Acid Sequence  (6)
  • Evolution, Molecular  (5)
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: The human lens is comprised largely of crystallin proteins assembled into a highly ordered, interactive macro-structure essential for lens transparency and refractive index. Any disruption of intra- or inter-protein interactions will alter this delicate structure, exposing hydrophobic surfaces, with consequent protein aggregation and cataract formation. Cataracts are the most common cause of blindness worldwide, affecting tens of millions of people, and currently the only treatment is surgical removal of cataractous lenses. The precise mechanisms by which lens proteins both prevent aggregation and maintain lens transparency are largely unknown. Lanosterol is an amphipathic molecule enriched in the lens. It is synthesized by lanosterol synthase (LSS) in a key cyclization reaction of a cholesterol synthesis pathway. Here we identify two distinct homozygous LSS missense mutations (W581R and G588S) in two families with extensive congenital cataracts. Both of these mutations affect highly conserved amino acid residues and impair key catalytic functions of LSS. Engineered expression of wild-type, but not mutant, LSS prevents intracellular protein aggregation of various cataract-causing mutant crystallins. Treatment by lanosterol, but not cholesterol, significantly decreased preformed protein aggregates both in vitro and in cell-transfection experiments. We further show that lanosterol treatment could reduce cataract severity and increase transparency in dissected rabbit cataractous lenses in vitro and cataract severity in vivo in dogs. Our study identifies lanosterol as a key molecule in the prevention of lens protein aggregation and points to a novel strategy for cataract prevention and treatment.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhao, Ling -- Chen, Xiang-Jun -- Zhu, Jie -- Xi, Yi-Bo -- Yang, Xu -- Hu, Li-Dan -- Ouyang, Hong -- Patel, Sherrina H -- Jin, Xin -- Lin, Danni -- Wu, Frances -- Flagg, Ken -- Cai, Huimin -- Li, Gen -- Cao, Guiqun -- Lin, Ying -- Chen, Daniel -- Wen, Cindy -- Chung, Christopher -- Wang, Yandong -- Qiu, Austin -- Yeh, Emily -- Wang, Wenqiu -- Hu, Xun -- Grob, Seanna -- Abagyan, Ruben -- Su, Zhiguang -- Tjondro, Harry Christianto -- Zhao, Xi-Juan -- Luo, Hongrong -- Hou, Rui -- Perry, J Jefferson P -- Gao, Weiwei -- Kozak, Igor -- Granet, David -- Li, Yingrui -- Sun, Xiaodong -- Wang, Jun -- Zhang, Liangfang -- Liu, Yizhi -- Yan, Yong-Bin -- Zhang, Kang -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 30;523(7562):607-11. doi: 10.1038/nature14650. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [3] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Membrane Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. ; 1] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [2] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China. ; State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] CapitalBio Genomics Co., Ltd., Dongguan 523808, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 20080, China. ; Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California 92521, USA. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ; Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 20080, China. ; Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [3] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [4] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [5] Veterans Administration Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200341" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Amyloid/chemistry/drug effects/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Cataract/congenital/*drug therapy/genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Cell Line ; Child ; Crystallins/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Dogs ; Female ; Humans ; Lanosterol/administration & dosage/*pharmacology/*therapeutic use ; Lens, Crystalline/drug effects/metabolism/pathology ; Male ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutant Proteins/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Pedigree ; Protein Aggregates/*drug effects ; Protein Aggregation, Pathological/*drug therapy/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-05-21
    Description: The transmission of information from DNA to RNA is a critical process. We compared RNA sequences from human B cells of 27 individuals to the corresponding DNA sequences from the same individuals and uncovered more than 10,000 exonic sites where the RNA sequences do not match that of the DNA. All 12 possible categories of discordances were observed. These differences were nonrandom as many sites were found in multiple individuals and in different cell types, including primary skin cells and brain tissues. Using mass spectrometry, we detected peptides that are translated from the discordant RNA sequences and thus do not correspond exactly to the DNA sequences. These widespread RNA-DNA differences in the human transcriptome provide a yet unexplored aspect of genome variation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3204392/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3204392/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Mingyao -- Wang, Isabel X -- Li, Yun -- Bruzel, Alan -- Richards, Allison L -- Toung, Jonathan M -- Cheung, Vivian G -- R01 HG005854/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG005854-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jul 1;333(6038):53-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1207018. Epub 2011 May 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21596952" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Aged ; Amino Acid Sequence ; B-Lymphocytes ; Base Sequence ; Cell Line ; Cerebral Cortex/cytology ; DNA/chemistry/*genetics ; Exons ; Expressed Sequence Tags ; Fibroblasts ; Gene Expression Profiling ; *Genetic Variation ; *Genome, Human ; Genotype ; Humans ; Mass Spectrometry ; Middle Aged ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Protein Biosynthesis ; Proteins/chemistry ; Proteome/chemistry ; RNA, Messenger/chemistry/*genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Sequence Analysis, RNA ; Skin/cytology ; Untranslated Regions
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2011-05-10
    Description: Vascular plants appeared ~410 million years ago, then diverged into several lineages of which only two survive: the euphyllophytes (ferns and seed plants) and the lycophytes. We report here the genome sequence of the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii (Selaginella), the first nonseed vascular plant genome reported. By comparing gene content in evolutionarily diverse taxa, we found that the transition from a gametophyte- to a sporophyte-dominated life cycle required far fewer new genes than the transition from a nonseed vascular to a flowering plant, whereas secondary metabolic genes expanded extensively and in parallel in the lycophyte and angiosperm lineages. Selaginella differs in posttranscriptional gene regulation, including small RNA regulation of repetitive elements, an absence of the trans-acting small interfering RNA pathway, and extensive RNA editing of organellar genes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3166216/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3166216/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Banks, Jo Ann -- Nishiyama, Tomoaki -- Hasebe, Mitsuyasu -- Bowman, John L -- Gribskov, Michael -- dePamphilis, Claude -- Albert, Victor A -- Aono, Naoki -- Aoyama, Tsuyoshi -- Ambrose, Barbara A -- Ashton, Neil W -- Axtell, Michael J -- Barker, Elizabeth -- Barker, Michael S -- Bennetzen, Jeffrey L -- Bonawitz, Nicholas D -- Chapple, Clint -- Cheng, Chaoyang -- Correa, Luiz Gustavo Guedes -- Dacre, Michael -- DeBarry, Jeremy -- Dreyer, Ingo -- Elias, Marek -- Engstrom, Eric M -- Estelle, Mark -- Feng, Liang -- Finet, Cedric -- Floyd, Sandra K -- Frommer, Wolf B -- Fujita, Tomomichi -- Gramzow, Lydia -- Gutensohn, Michael -- Harholt, Jesper -- Hattori, Mitsuru -- Heyl, Alexander -- Hirai, Tadayoshi -- Hiwatashi, Yuji -- Ishikawa, Masaki -- Iwata, Mineko -- Karol, Kenneth G -- Koehler, Barbara -- Kolukisaoglu, Uener -- Kubo, Minoru -- Kurata, Tetsuya -- Lalonde, Sylvie -- Li, Kejie -- Li, Ying -- Litt, Amy -- Lyons, Eric -- Manning, Gerard -- Maruyama, Takeshi -- Michael, Todd P -- Mikami, Koji -- Miyazaki, Saori -- Morinaga, Shin-ichi -- Murata, Takashi -- Mueller-Roeber, Bernd -- Nelson, David R -- Obara, Mari -- Oguri, Yasuko -- Olmstead, Richard G -- Onodera, Naoko -- Petersen, Bent Larsen -- Pils, Birgit -- Prigge, Michael -- Rensing, Stefan A -- Riano-Pachon, Diego Mauricio -- Roberts, Alison W -- Sato, Yoshikatsu -- Scheller, Henrik Vibe -- Schulz, Burkhard -- Schulz, Christian -- Shakirov, Eugene V -- Shibagaki, Nakako -- Shinohara, Naoki -- Shippen, Dorothy E -- Sorensen, Iben -- Sotooka, Ryo -- Sugimoto, Nagisa -- Sugita, Mamoru -- Sumikawa, Naomi -- Tanurdzic, Milos -- Theissen, Gunter -- Ulvskov, Peter -- Wakazuki, Sachiko -- Weng, Jing-Ke -- Willats, William W G T -- Wipf, Daniel -- Wolf, Paul G -- Yang, Lixing -- Zimmer, Andreas D -- Zhu, Qihui -- Mitros, Therese -- Hellsten, Uffe -- Loque, Dominique -- Otillar, Robert -- Salamov, Asaf -- Schmutz, Jeremy -- Shapiro, Harris -- Lindquist, Erika -- Lucas, Susan -- Rokhsar, Daniel -- Grigoriev, Igor V -- GM065383/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM84051/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- HG004164/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM043644/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM084051/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM084051-01A1/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004164/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004164-02/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004164-03/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004164-04/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007757/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32-HG00035/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 May 20;332(6032):960-3. doi: 10.1126/science.1203810. Epub 2011 May 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. banksj@purdue.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21551031" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Angiosperms/chemistry/genetics ; *Biological Evolution ; Bryopsida/genetics ; Chlamydomonas/chemistry/genetics ; DNA Transposable Elements ; Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant ; Genes, Plant ; *Genome, Plant ; MicroRNAs/genetics ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Phylogeny ; Plant Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Proteome/analysis ; RNA Editing ; RNA, Plant/genetics ; Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid ; Selaginellaceae/*genetics/growth & development/metabolism ; Sequence Analysis, DNA
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-03-05
    Description: Recognition of modified histones by 'reader' proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of chromatin. H3K36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) is deposited onto the nucleosomes in the transcribed regions after RNA polymerase II elongation. In yeast, this mark in turn recruits epigenetic regulators to reset the chromatin to a relatively repressive state, thus suppressing cryptic transcription. However, much less is known about the role of H3K36me3 in transcription regulation in mammals. This is further complicated by the transcription-coupled incorporation of the histone variant H3.3 in gene bodies. Here we show that the candidate tumour suppressor ZMYND11 specifically recognizes H3K36me3 on H3.3 (H3.3K36me3) and regulates RNA polymerase II elongation. Structural studies show that in addition to the trimethyl-lysine binding by an aromatic cage within the PWWP domain, the H3.3-dependent recognition is mediated by the encapsulation of the H3.3-specific 'Ser 31' residue in a composite pocket formed by the tandem bromo-PWWP domains of ZMYND11. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing shows a genome-wide co-localization of ZMYND11 with H3K36me3 and H3.3 in gene bodies, and its occupancy requires the pre-deposition of H3.3K36me3. Although ZMYND11 is associated with highly expressed genes, it functions as an unconventional transcription co-repressor by modulating RNA polymerase II at the elongation stage. ZMYND11 is critical for the repression of a transcriptional program that is essential for tumour cell growth; low expression levels of ZMYND11 in breast cancer patients correlate with worse prognosis. Consistently, overexpression of ZMYND11 suppresses cancer cell growth in vitro and tumour formation in mice. Together, this study identifies ZMYND11 as an H3.3-specific reader of H3K36me3 that links the histone-variant-mediated transcription elongation control to tumour suppression.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wen, Hong -- Li, Yuanyuan -- Xi, Yuanxin -- Jiang, Shiming -- Stratton, Sabrina -- Peng, Danni -- Tanaka, Kaori -- Ren, Yongfeng -- Xia, Zheng -- Wu, Jun -- Li, Bing -- Barton, Michelle C -- Li, Wei -- Li, Haitao -- Shi, Xiaobing -- CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 10;508(7495):263-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13045. Epub 2014 Mar 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3]. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [3]. ; 1] Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2]. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Genes and Development Graduate Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Teaxs 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590075" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Breast Neoplasms/*genetics/metabolism/*pathology ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Chromatin/genetics/metabolism ; Co-Repressor Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disease-Free Survival ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Histones/chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Lysine/*metabolism ; Methylation ; Mice ; Mice, Nude ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Oncogenes/genetics ; Prognosis ; Protein Binding ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; RNA Polymerase II/*metabolism ; Substrate Specificity ; *Transcription Elongation, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2013-07-28
    Description: The essential bacterial protein FtsZ is a guanosine triphosphatase that self-assembles into a structure at the division site termed the "Z ring". During cytokinesis, the Z ring exerts a constrictive force on the membrane by using the chemical energy of guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis. However, the structural basis of this constriction remains unresolved. Here, we present the crystal structure of a guanosine diphosphate-bound Mycobacterium tuberculosis FtsZ protofilament, which exhibits a curved conformational state. The structure reveals a longitudinal interface that is important for function. The protofilament curvature highlights a hydrolysis-dependent conformational switch at the T3 loop that leads to longitudinal bending between subunits, which could generate sufficient force to drive cytokinesis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3816583/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3816583/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Ying -- Hsin, Jen -- Zhao, Lingyun -- Cheng, Yiwen -- Shang, Weina -- Huang, Kerwyn Casey -- Wang, Hong-Wei -- Ye, Sheng -- 1F32GM100677-01A1/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- DP2 OD006466/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP2OD006466/OD/NIH HHS/ -- F32 GM100677/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Jul 26;341(6144):392-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1239248.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Life Sciences Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 Zhejiang, P.R. China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23888039" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Bacterial Proteins/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Cell Membrane/physiology ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; *Cytokinesis ; Cytoskeletal Proteins/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Escherichia coli/chemistry ; Guanosine Diphosphate/chemistry/metabolism ; Guanosine Triphosphate/metabolism ; Hydrolysis ; Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Dynamics Simulation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mycobacterium tuberculosis/*chemistry/physiology ; Point Mutation ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein Subunits/chemistry/metabolism ; Staphylococcus aureus/chemistry
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2011-07-12
    Description: Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is the world's most important non-grain food crop and is central to global food security. It is clonally propagated, highly heterozygous, autotetraploid, and suffers acute inbreeding depression. Here we use a homozygous doubled-monoploid potato clone to sequence and assemble 86% of the 844-megabase genome. We predict 39,031 protein-coding genes and present evidence for at least two genome duplication events indicative of a palaeopolyploid origin. As the first genome sequence of an asterid, the potato genome reveals 2,642 genes specific to this large angiosperm clade. We also sequenced a heterozygous diploid clone and show that gene presence/absence variants and other potentially deleterious mutations occur frequently and are a likely cause of inbreeding depression. Gene family expansion, tissue-specific expression and recruitment of genes to new pathways contributed to the evolution of tuber development. The potato genome sequence provides a platform for genetic improvement of this vital crop.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Potato Genome Sequencing Consortium -- Xu, Xun -- Pan, Shengkai -- Cheng, Shifeng -- Zhang, Bo -- Mu, Desheng -- Ni, Peixiang -- Zhang, Gengyun -- Yang, Shuang -- Li, Ruiqiang -- Wang, Jun -- Orjeda, Gisella -- Guzman, Frank -- Torres, Michael -- Lozano, Roberto -- Ponce, Olga -- Martinez, Diana -- De la Cruz, German -- Chakrabarti, S K -- Patil, Virupaksh U -- Skryabin, Konstantin G -- Kuznetsov, Boris B -- Ravin, Nikolai V -- Kolganova, Tatjana V -- Beletsky, Alexey V -- Mardanov, Andrei V -- Di Genova, Alex -- Bolser, Daniel M -- Martin, David M A -- Li, Guangcun -- Yang, Yu -- Kuang, Hanhui -- Hu, Qun -- Xiong, Xingyao -- Bishop, Gerard J -- Sagredo, Boris -- Mejia, Nilo -- Zagorski, Wlodzimierz -- Gromadka, Robert -- Gawor, Jan -- Szczesny, Pawel -- Huang, Sanwen -- Zhang, Zhonghua -- Liang, Chunbo -- He, Jun -- Li, Ying -- He, Ying -- Xu, Jianfei -- Zhang, Youjun -- Xie, Binyan -- Du, Yongchen -- Qu, Dongyu -- Bonierbale, Merideth -- Ghislain, Marc -- Herrera, Maria del Rosario -- Giuliano, Giovanni -- Pietrella, Marco -- Perrotta, Gaetano -- Facella, Paolo -- O'Brien, Kimberly -- Feingold, Sergio E -- Barreiro, Leandro E -- Massa, Gabriela A -- Diambra, Luis -- Whitty, Brett R -- Vaillancourt, Brieanne -- Lin, Haining -- Massa, Alicia N -- Geoffroy, Michael -- Lundback, Steven -- DellaPenna, Dean -- Buell, C Robin -- Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar -- Marshall, David F -- Waugh, Robbie -- Bryan, Glenn J -- Destefanis, Marialaura -- Nagy, Istvan -- Milbourne, Dan -- Thomson, Susan J -- Fiers, Mark -- Jacobs, Jeanne M E -- Nielsen, Kare L -- Sonderkaer, Mads -- Iovene, Marina -- Torres, Giovana A -- Jiang, Jiming -- Veilleux, Richard E -- Bachem, Christian W B -- de Boer, Jan -- Borm, Theo -- Kloosterman, Bjorn -- van Eck, Herman -- Datema, Erwin -- Hekkert, Bas te Lintel -- Goverse, Aska -- van Ham, Roeland C H J -- Visser, Richard G F -- BB/F012640/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/F012640/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- WT 083481/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2011 Jul 10;475(7355):189-95. doi: 10.1038/nature10158.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉BGI-Shenzhen, Chinese Ministry of Agricultural, Key Lab of Genomics, Beishan Industrial Zone, Yantian District, Shenzhen 518083, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21743474" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Duplication ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant ; Genes, Plant/genetics ; Genetic Variation ; Genome, Plant/*genetics ; *Genomics ; Haplotypes/genetics ; Heterozygote ; Homozygote ; Immunity, Innate ; Inbreeding ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Plant Diseases/genetics ; Ploidies ; Solanum tuberosum/*genetics/physiology
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2012-09-21
    Description: The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas belongs to one of the most species-rich but genomically poorly explored phyla, the Mollusca. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the oyster genome using short reads and a fosmid-pooling strategy, along with transcriptomes of development and stress response and the proteome of the shell. The oyster genome is highly polymorphic and rich in repetitive sequences, with some transposable elements still actively shaping variation. Transcriptome studies reveal an extensive set of genes responding to environmental stress. The expansion of genes coding for heat shock protein 70 and inhibitors of apoptosis is probably central to the oyster's adaptation to sessile life in the highly stressful intertidal zone. Our analyses also show that shell formation in molluscs is more complex than currently understood and involves extensive participation of cells and their exosomes. The oyster genome sequence fills a void in our understanding of the Lophotrochozoa.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Guofan -- Fang, Xiaodong -- Guo, Ximing -- Li, Li -- Luo, Ruibang -- Xu, Fei -- Yang, Pengcheng -- Zhang, Linlin -- Wang, Xiaotong -- Qi, Haigang -- Xiong, Zhiqiang -- Que, Huayong -- Xie, Yinlong -- Holland, Peter W H -- Paps, Jordi -- Zhu, Yabing -- Wu, Fucun -- Chen, Yuanxin -- Wang, Jiafeng -- Peng, Chunfang -- Meng, Jie -- Yang, Lan -- Liu, Jun -- Wen, Bo -- Zhang, Na -- Huang, Zhiyong -- Zhu, Qihui -- Feng, Yue -- Mount, Andrew -- Hedgecock, Dennis -- Xu, Zhe -- Liu, Yunjie -- Domazet-Loso, Tomislav -- Du, Yishuai -- Sun, Xiaoqing -- Zhang, Shoudu -- Liu, Binghang -- Cheng, Peizhou -- Jiang, Xuanting -- Li, Juan -- Fan, Dingding -- Wang, Wei -- Fu, Wenjing -- Wang, Tong -- Wang, Bo -- Zhang, Jibiao -- Peng, Zhiyu -- Li, Yingxiang -- Li, Na -- Wang, Jinpeng -- Chen, Maoshan -- He, Yan -- Tan, Fengji -- Song, Xiaorui -- Zheng, Qiumei -- Huang, Ronglian -- Yang, Hailong -- Du, Xuedi -- Chen, Li -- Yang, Mei -- Gaffney, Patrick M -- Wang, Shan -- Luo, Longhai -- She, Zhicai -- Ming, Yao -- Huang, Wen -- Zhang, Shu -- Huang, Baoyu -- Zhang, Yong -- Qu, Tao -- Ni, Peixiang -- Miao, Guoying -- Wang, Junyi -- Wang, Qiang -- Steinberg, Christian E W -- Wang, Haiyan -- Li, Ning -- Qian, Lumin -- Zhang, Guojie -- Li, Yingrui -- Yang, Huanming -- Liu, Xiao -- Wang, Jian -- Yin, Ye -- Wang, Jun -- 268513/European Research Council/International -- England -- Nature. 2012 Oct 4;490(7418):49-54. doi: 10.1038/nature11413. Epub 2012 Sep 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22992520" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptation, Physiological/*genetics ; Animal Shells/chemistry/*growth & development ; Animals ; Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/genetics ; Crassostrea/*genetics ; DNA Transposable Elements/genetics ; Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental/genetics ; Genes, Homeobox/genetics ; Genome/*genetics ; Genomics ; HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics ; Humans ; Larva/genetics/growth & development ; Mass Spectrometry ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Polymorphism, Genetic/genetics ; Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Stress, Physiological/genetics/*physiology ; Transcriptome/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2012-04-13
    Description: The spatial organization of the genome is intimately linked to its biological function, yet our understanding of higher order genomic structure is coarse, fragmented and incomplete. In the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, interphase chromosomes occupy distinct chromosome territories, and numerous models have been proposed for how chromosomes fold within chromosome territories. These models, however, provide only few mechanistic details about the relationship between higher order chromatin structure and genome function. Recent advances in genomic technologies have led to rapid advances in the study of three-dimensional genome organization. In particular, Hi-C has been introduced as a method for identifying higher order chromatin interactions genome wide. Here we investigate the three-dimensional organization of the human and mouse genomes in embryonic stem cells and terminally differentiated cell types at unprecedented resolution. We identify large, megabase-sized local chromatin interaction domains, which we term 'topological domains', as a pervasive structural feature of the genome organization. These domains correlate with regions of the genome that constrain the spread of heterochromatin. The domains are stable across different cell types and highly conserved across species, indicating that topological domains are an inherent property of mammalian genomes. Finally, we find that the boundaries of topological domains are enriched for the insulator binding protein CTCF, housekeeping genes, transfer RNAs and short interspersed element (SINE) retrotransposons, indicating that these factors may have a role in establishing the topological domain structure of the genome.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356448/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356448/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Dixon, Jesse R -- Selvaraj, Siddarth -- Yue, Feng -- Kim, Audrey -- Li, Yan -- Shen, Yin -- Hu, Ming -- Liu, Jun S -- Ren, Bing -- R01 HG003991/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG003991-03/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG003991-03S1/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01GH003991/GH/CGH CDC HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Apr 11;485(7398):376-80. doi: 10.1038/nature11082.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22495300" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Binding Sites ; Cell Differentiation ; Chromatin/chemistry/*genetics/*metabolism ; Chromosomes/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism ; Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; Genes, Essential/genetics ; *Genome ; Heterochromatin/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Humans ; Male ; Mammals/genetics ; Mice ; RNA, Transfer/genetics ; Repressor Proteins/metabolism ; Short Interspersed Nucleotide Elements/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2012-08-28
    Description: Plants possess arrays of functionally diverse specialized metabolites, many of which are distributed taxonomically. Here, we describe the evolution of a class of substituted alpha-pyrone metabolites in Arabidopsis, which we have named arabidopyrones. The biosynthesis of arabidopyrones requires a cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP84A4) to generate the catechol-substituted substrate for an extradiol ring-cleavage dioxygenase (AtLigB). Unlike other ring-cleavage-derived plant metabolites made from tyrosine, arabidopyrones are instead derived from phenylalanine through the early steps of phenylpropanoid metabolism. Whereas CYP84A4, an Arabidopsis-specific paralog of the lignin-biosynthetic enzyme CYP84A1, has neofunctionalized relative to its ancestor, AtLigB homologs are widespread among land plants and many bacteria. This study exemplifies the rapid evolution of a biochemical pathway formed by the addition of a new biological activity into an existing metabolic infrastructure.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Weng, Jing-Ke -- Li, Yi -- Mo, Huaping -- Chapple, Clint -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Aug 24;337(6097):960-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1221614.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biochemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22923580" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Arabidopsis/enzymology/genetics/*metabolism ; Arabidopsis Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Base Sequence ; Biosynthetic Pathways ; Catalytic Domain ; Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Dioxygenases/genetics/metabolism ; Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Duplication ; Genome, Plant ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutation ; Phenylalanine/metabolism ; Phylogeny ; Plant Stems/metabolism ; Plants, Genetically Modified ; Pyrones/chemistry/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2014-06-07
    Description: Sheep (Ovis aries) are a major source of meat, milk, and fiber in the form of wool and represent a distinct class of animals that have a specialized digestive organ, the rumen, that carries out the initial digestion of plant material. We have developed and analyzed a high-quality reference sheep genome and transcriptomes from 40 different tissues. We identified highly expressed genes encoding keratin cross-linking proteins associated with rumen evolution. We also identified genes involved in lipid metabolism that had been amplified and/or had altered tissue expression patterns. This may be in response to changes in the barrier lipids of the skin, an interaction between lipid metabolism and wool synthesis, and an increased role of volatile fatty acids in ruminants compared with nonruminant animals.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4157056/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4157056/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jiang, Yu -- Xie, Min -- Chen, Wenbin -- Talbot, Richard -- Maddox, Jillian F -- Faraut, Thomas -- Wu, Chunhua -- Muzny, Donna M -- Li, Yuxiang -- Zhang, Wenguang -- Stanton, Jo-Ann -- Brauning, Rudiger -- Barris, Wesley C -- Hourlier, Thibaut -- Aken, Bronwen L -- Searle, Stephen M J -- Adelson, David L -- Bian, Chao -- Cam, Graham R -- Chen, Yulin -- Cheng, Shifeng -- DeSilva, Udaya -- Dixen, Karen -- Dong, Yang -- Fan, Guangyi -- Franklin, Ian R -- Fu, Shaoyin -- Fuentes-Utrilla, Pablo -- Guan, Rui -- Highland, Margaret A -- Holder, Michael E -- Huang, Guodong -- Ingham, Aaron B -- Jhangiani, Shalini N -- Kalra, Divya -- Kovar, Christie L -- Lee, Sandra L -- Liu, Weiqing -- Liu, Xin -- Lu, Changxin -- Lv, Tian -- Mathew, Tittu -- McWilliam, Sean -- Menzies, Moira -- Pan, Shengkai -- Robelin, David -- Servin, Bertrand -- Townley, David -- Wang, Wenliang -- Wei, Bin -- White, Stephen N -- Yang, Xinhua -- Ye, Chen -- Yue, Yaojing -- Zeng, Peng -- Zhou, Qing -- Hansen, Jacob B -- Kristiansen, Karsten -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Flicek, Paul -- Warkup, Christopher C -- Jones, Huw E -- Oddy, V Hutton -- Nicholas, Frank W -- McEwan, John C -- Kijas, James W -- Wang, Jun -- Worley, Kim C -- Archibald, Alan L -- Cockett, Noelle -- Xu, Xun -- Wang, Wen -- Dalrymple, Brian P -- 095908/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 098051/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- BB/1025360/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/I025328/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/I025360/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/I025506/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- WT095908/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- WT098051/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jun 6;344(6188):1168-73. doi: 10.1126/science.1252806.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223, China. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Animal Food and Health Sciences, St Lucia, QLD 4067, Australia. College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. ; Ediburgh Genomics, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK. ; Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-4815, USA. ; Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Laboratoire de Genetique Cellulaire, UMR 444, Castanet-Tolosan F-31326, France. ; Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-1435, USA. ; Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223, China. Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, Hohhot 010018, China. Institute of ATCG, Nei Mongol Bio-Information, Hohhot, China. ; Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand. ; AgResearch, Invermay Agricultural Centre, Mosgiel 9053, New Zealand. ; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Animal Food and Health Sciences, St Lucia, QLD 4067, Australia. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK. European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK. ; College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China. ; Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark. ; State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223, China. ; Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, Hohhot 010018, China. ; U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Animal Disease Research Unit, Pullman, WA 99164, USA. Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. Maize Research Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. ; Lanzhou Institute of Husbandry and Pharmaceutical Science, Lanzhou, 730050, China. ; Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. ; European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK. ; Biosciences Knowledge Transfer Network, The Roslin Institute, Easter Bush, Midlothian, EH25 9RG, UK. ; School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia. ; Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. Princess Al Jawhara Center of Excellence in the Research of Hereditary Disorders, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia. Macau University of Science and Technology, Macau 999078, China. ; Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. brian.dalrymple@csiro.au wwang@mail.kiz.ac.cn xuxun@genomics.cn alan.archibald@roslin.ed.ac.uk kworley@bcm.edu noelle.cockett@usu.edu. ; The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK. brian.dalrymple@csiro.au wwang@mail.kiz.ac.cn xuxun@genomics.cn alan.archibald@roslin.ed.ac.uk kworley@bcm.edu noelle.cockett@usu.edu. ; Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-1435, USA. brian.dalrymple@csiro.au wwang@mail.kiz.ac.cn xuxun@genomics.cn alan.archibald@roslin.ed.ac.uk kworley@bcm.edu noelle.cockett@usu.edu. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. brian.dalrymple@csiro.au wwang@mail.kiz.ac.cn xuxun@genomics.cn alan.archibald@roslin.ed.ac.uk kworley@bcm.edu noelle.cockett@usu.edu. ; State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223, China. brian.dalrymple@csiro.au wwang@mail.kiz.ac.cn xuxun@genomics.cn alan.archibald@roslin.ed.ac.uk kworley@bcm.edu noelle.cockett@usu.edu. ; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Animal Food and Health Sciences, St Lucia, QLD 4067, Australia. brian.dalrymple@csiro.au wwang@mail.kiz.ac.cn xuxun@genomics.cn alan.archibald@roslin.ed.ac.uk kworley@bcm.edu noelle.cockett@usu.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24904168" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Fatty Acids, Volatile/metabolism/physiology ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Genome ; Keratins, Hair-Specific/genetics ; Lipid Metabolism/genetics/*physiology ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Phylogeny ; Rumen/metabolism/*physiology ; Sheep, Domestic/classification/*genetics/*metabolism ; Transcriptome ; Wool/growth & development
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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