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  • Female  (18)
  • Amino Acid Sequence  (6)
  • Mutation  (6)
  • Evolution, Molecular  (5)
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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-06-09
    Description: A fundamental feature of the mammalian neocortex is its columnar organization. In the visual cortex, functional columns consisting of neurons with similar orientation preferences have been characterized extensively, but how these columns are constructed during development remains unclear. The radial unit hypothesis posits that the ontogenetic columns formed by clonally related neurons migrating along the same radial glial fibre during corticogenesis provide the basis for functional columns in adult neocortex. However, a direct correspondence between the ontogenetic and functional columns has not been demonstrated. Here we show that, despite the lack of a discernible orientation map in mouse visual cortex, sister neurons in the same radial clone exhibit similar orientation preferences. Using a retroviral vector encoding green fluorescent protein to label radial clones of excitatory neurons, and in vivo two-photon calcium imaging to measure neuronal response properties, we found that sister neurons preferred similar orientations whereas nearby non-sister neurons showed no such relationship. Interestingly, disruption of gap junction coupling by viral expression of a dominant-negative mutant of Cx26 (also known as Gjb2) or by daily administration of a gap junction blocker, carbenoxolone, during the first postnatal week greatly diminished the functional similarity between sister neurons, suggesting that the maturation of ontogenetic into functional columns requires intercellular communication through gap junctions. Together with the recent finding of preferential excitatory connections among sister neurons, our results support the radial unit hypothesis and unify the ontogenetic and functional columns in the visual cortex.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3375857/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3375857/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Ye -- Lu, Hui -- Cheng, Pei-lin -- Ge, Shaoyu -- Xu, Huatai -- Shi, Song-Hai -- Dan, Yang -- R01 DA024681/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY018861/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS065915/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R21NS072483/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 May 2;486(7401):118-21. doi: 10.1038/nature11110.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Neurobiology, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22678292" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Animals, Newborn ; Carbenoxolone/pharmacology ; *Cell Communication ; Clone Cells/cytology ; Connexins/genetics/metabolism ; Female ; Gap Junctions/drug effects/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Models, Neurological ; Neurons/*physiology ; Visual Cortex/*cytology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-09-13
    Description: Established infections with the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV, respectively) are thought to be permanent with even the most effective immune responses and antiretroviral therapies only able to control, but not clear, these infections. Whether the residual virus that maintains these infections is vulnerable to clearance is a question of central importance to the future management of millions of HIV-infected individuals. We recently reported that approximately 50% of rhesus macaques (RM; Macaca mulatta) vaccinated with SIV protein-expressing rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV/SIV) vectors manifest durable, aviraemic control of infection with the highly pathogenic strain SIVmac239 (ref. 5). Here we show that regardless of the route of challenge, RhCMV/SIV vector-elicited immune responses control SIVmac239 after demonstrable lymphatic and haematogenous viral dissemination, and that replication-competent SIV persists in several sites for weeks to months. Over time, however, protected RM lost signs of SIV infection, showing a consistent lack of measurable plasma- or tissue-associated virus using ultrasensitive assays, and a loss of T-cell reactivity to SIV determinants not in the vaccine. Extensive ultrasensitive quantitative PCR and quantitative PCR with reverse transcription analyses of tissues from RhCMV/SIV vector-protected RM necropsied 69-172 weeks after challenge did not detect SIV RNA or DNA sequences above background levels, and replication-competent SIV was not detected in these RM by extensive co-culture analysis of tissues or by adoptive transfer of 60 million haematolymphoid cells to naive RM. These data provide compelling evidence for progressive clearance of a pathogenic lentiviral infection, and suggest that some lentiviral reservoirs may be susceptible to the continuous effector memory T-cell-mediated immune surveillance elicited and maintained by cytomegalovirus vectors.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3849456/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3849456/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hansen, Scott G -- Piatak, Michael Jr -- Ventura, Abigail B -- Hughes, Colette M -- Gilbride, Roxanne M -- Ford, Julia C -- Oswald, Kelli -- Shoemaker, Rebecca -- Li, Yuan -- Lewis, Matthew S -- Gilliam, Awbrey N -- Xu, Guangwu -- Whizin, Nathan -- Burwitz, Benjamin J -- Planer, Shannon L -- Turner, John M -- Legasse, Alfred W -- Axthelm, Michael K -- Nelson, Jay A -- Fruh, Klaus -- Sacha, Jonah B -- Estes, Jacob D -- Keele, Brandon F -- Edlefsen, Paul T -- Lifson, Jeffrey D -- Picker, Louis J -- HHSN261200800001E/PHS HHS/ -- P01 AI094417/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P51OD011092/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI060392/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 DE021291/DE/NIDCR NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI054292/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI095985/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI096109/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U24 OD010850/OD/NIH HHS/ -- U42 OD010426/OD/NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Oct 3;502(7469):100-4. doi: 10.1038/nature12519. Epub 2013 Sep 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute and Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24025770" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cytomegalovirus/genetics/immunology ; Female ; Macaca mulatta ; Male ; Molecular Sequence Data ; SAIDS Vaccines/*immunology ; Simian Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/*prevention & control/virology ; Simian Immunodeficiency Virus/*immunology ; Time Factors ; Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology ; Viral Load ; Virus Replication/physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-03-05
    Description: Recognition of modified histones by 'reader' proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of chromatin. H3K36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) is deposited onto the nucleosomes in the transcribed regions after RNA polymerase II elongation. In yeast, this mark in turn recruits epigenetic regulators to reset the chromatin to a relatively repressive state, thus suppressing cryptic transcription. However, much less is known about the role of H3K36me3 in transcription regulation in mammals. This is further complicated by the transcription-coupled incorporation of the histone variant H3.3 in gene bodies. Here we show that the candidate tumour suppressor ZMYND11 specifically recognizes H3K36me3 on H3.3 (H3.3K36me3) and regulates RNA polymerase II elongation. Structural studies show that in addition to the trimethyl-lysine binding by an aromatic cage within the PWWP domain, the H3.3-dependent recognition is mediated by the encapsulation of the H3.3-specific 'Ser 31' residue in a composite pocket formed by the tandem bromo-PWWP domains of ZMYND11. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing shows a genome-wide co-localization of ZMYND11 with H3K36me3 and H3.3 in gene bodies, and its occupancy requires the pre-deposition of H3.3K36me3. Although ZMYND11 is associated with highly expressed genes, it functions as an unconventional transcription co-repressor by modulating RNA polymerase II at the elongation stage. ZMYND11 is critical for the repression of a transcriptional program that is essential for tumour cell growth; low expression levels of ZMYND11 in breast cancer patients correlate with worse prognosis. Consistently, overexpression of ZMYND11 suppresses cancer cell growth in vitro and tumour formation in mice. Together, this study identifies ZMYND11 as an H3.3-specific reader of H3K36me3 that links the histone-variant-mediated transcription elongation control to tumour suppression.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wen, Hong -- Li, Yuanyuan -- Xi, Yuanxin -- Jiang, Shiming -- Stratton, Sabrina -- Peng, Danni -- Tanaka, Kaori -- Ren, Yongfeng -- Xia, Zheng -- Wu, Jun -- Li, Bing -- Barton, Michelle C -- Li, Wei -- Li, Haitao -- Shi, Xiaobing -- CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 10;508(7495):263-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13045. Epub 2014 Mar 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3]. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [3]. ; 1] Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2]. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Genes and Development Graduate Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Teaxs 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590075" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Breast Neoplasms/*genetics/metabolism/*pathology ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Chromatin/genetics/metabolism ; Co-Repressor Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disease-Free Survival ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Histones/chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Lysine/*metabolism ; Methylation ; Mice ; Mice, Nude ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Oncogenes/genetics ; Prognosis ; Protein Binding ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; RNA Polymerase II/*metabolism ; Substrate Specificity ; *Transcription Elongation, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-02-21
    Description: Crohn's disease is a debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can involve the entire digestive tract. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) encoding a missense variant in the autophagy gene ATG16L1 (rs2241880, Thr300Ala) is strongly associated with the incidence of Crohn's disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated the effect of ATG16L1 deletion or deficiency; however, the molecular consequences of the Thr300Ala (T300A) variant remains unknown. Here we show that amino acids 296-299 constitute a caspase cleavage motif in ATG16L1 and that the T300A variant (T316A in mice) significantly increases ATG16L1 sensitization to caspase-3-mediated processing. We observed that death-receptor activation or starvation-induced metabolic stress in human and murine macrophages increased degradation of the T300A or T316A variants of ATG16L1, respectively, resulting in diminished autophagy. Knock-in mice harbouring the T316A variant showed defective clearance of the ileal pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica and an elevated inflammatory cytokine response. In turn, deletion of the caspase-3-encoding gene, Casp3, or elimination of the caspase cleavage site by site-directed mutagenesis rescued starvation-induced autophagy and pathogen clearance, respectively. These findings demonstrate that caspase 3 activation in the presence of a common risk allele leads to accelerated degradation of ATG16L1, placing cellular stress, apoptotic stimuli and impaired autophagy in a unified pathway that predisposes to Crohn's disease.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Murthy, Aditya -- Li, Yun -- Peng, Ivan -- Reichelt, Mike -- Katakam, Anand Kumar -- Noubade, Rajkumar -- Roose-Girma, Merone -- DeVoss, Jason -- Diehl, Lauri -- Graham, Robert R -- van Lookeren Campagne, Menno -- England -- Nature. 2014 Feb 27;506(7489):456-62. doi: 10.1038/nature13044. Epub 2014 Feb 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Immunology, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; ITGR Human Genetics, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24553140" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Animals ; Autophagy/genetics ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/*genetics/*metabolism ; Caspase 3/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Cell Line ; Cells, Cultured ; Crohn Disease/*genetics/pathology ; Cytokines/immunology ; Enzyme Activation ; Female ; Food Deprivation ; Humans ; Macrophages/immunology/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mutagenesis, Site-Directed ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/*genetics ; *Proteolysis ; Stress, Physiological ; Yersinia enterocolitica/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2016-03-24
    Description: Primary cilia are solitary, generally non-motile, hair-like protrusions that extend from the surface of cells between cell divisions. Their antenna-like structure leads naturally to the assumption that they sense the surrounding environment, the most common hypothesis being sensation of mechanical force through calcium-permeable ion channels within the cilium. This Ca(2+)-responsive mechanosensor hypothesis for primary cilia has been invoked to explain a large range of biological responses, from control of left-right axis determination in embryonic development to adult progression of polycystic kidney disease and some cancers. Here we report the complete lack of mechanically induced calcium increases in primary cilia, in tissues upon which this hypothesis has been based. We developed a transgenic mouse, Arl13b-mCherry-GECO1.2, expressing a ratiometric genetically encoded calcium indicator in all primary cilia. We then measured responses to flow in primary cilia of cultured kidney epithelial cells, kidney thick ascending tubules, crown cells of the embryonic node, kinocilia of inner ear hair cells, and several cell lines. Cilia-specific Ca(2+) influxes were not observed in physiological or even highly supraphysiological levels of fluid flow. We conclude that mechanosensation, if it originates in primary cilia, is not via calcium signalling.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851444/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851444/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Delling, M -- Indzhykulian, A A -- Liu, X -- Li, Y -- Xie, T -- Corey, D P -- Clapham, D E -- 5R01 DC000304/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/ -- P30-HD 18655/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 DC000304/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 31;531(7596):656-60. doi: 10.1038/nature17426. Epub 2016 Mar 23.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cardiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Image and Data Analysis Core (IDAC), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27007841" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Calcium/analysis/*metabolism ; Calcium Signaling ; Cilia/*metabolism ; Embryo, Mammalian/cytology ; Epithelial Cells/cytology ; Female ; Hair Cells, Auditory, Inner/cytology ; Kidney/cytology ; Male ; *Mechanotransduction, Cellular ; Mice ; Mice, Transgenic ; Models, Biological
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2011-08-27
    Description: Uterine leiomyomas, or fibroids, are benign tumors that affect millions of women worldwide and that can cause considerable morbidity. To study the genetic basis of this tumor type, we examined 18 uterine leiomyomas derived from 17 different patients by exome sequencing and identified tumor-specific mutations in the mediator complex subunit 12 (MED12) gene in 10. Through analysis of 207 additional tumors, we determined that MED12 is altered in 70% (159 of 225) of tumors from a total of 80 patients. The Mediator complex is a 26-subunit transcriptional regulator that bridges DNA regulatory sequences to the RNA polymerase II initiation complex. All mutations resided in exon 2, suggesting that aberrant function of this region of MED12 contributes to tumorigenesis.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Makinen, Netta -- Mehine, Miika -- Tolvanen, Jaana -- Kaasinen, Eevi -- Li, Yilong -- Lehtonen, Heli J -- Gentile, Massimiliano -- Yan, Jian -- Enge, Martin -- Taipale, Minna -- Aavikko, Mervi -- Katainen, Riku -- Virolainen, Elina -- Bohling, Tom -- Koski, Taru A -- Launonen, Virpi -- Sjoberg, Jari -- Taipale, Jussi -- Vahteristo, Pia -- Aaltonen, Lauri A -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Oct 14;334(6053):252-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1208930. Epub 2011 Aug 25.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Medical Genetics, Genome-Scale Biology Research Program, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21868628" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Codon ; Exons ; Female ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Humans ; INDEL Mutation ; Introns ; Leiomyoma/*genetics/metabolism ; Mediator Complex/*genetics ; Mutation ; Mutation, Missense ; Signal Transduction ; Uterine Neoplasms/*genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-06-07
    Description: Sheep (Ovis aries) are a major source of meat, milk, and fiber in the form of wool and represent a distinct class of animals that have a specialized digestive organ, the rumen, that carries out the initial digestion of plant material. We have developed and analyzed a high-quality reference sheep genome and transcriptomes from 40 different tissues. We identified highly expressed genes encoding keratin cross-linking proteins associated with rumen evolution. We also identified genes involved in lipid metabolism that had been amplified and/or had altered tissue expression patterns. This may be in response to changes in the barrier lipids of the skin, an interaction between lipid metabolism and wool synthesis, and an increased role of volatile fatty acids in ruminants compared with nonruminant animals.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4157056/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4157056/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jiang, Yu -- Xie, Min -- Chen, Wenbin -- Talbot, Richard -- Maddox, Jillian F -- Faraut, Thomas -- Wu, Chunhua -- Muzny, Donna M -- Li, Yuxiang -- Zhang, Wenguang -- Stanton, Jo-Ann -- Brauning, Rudiger -- Barris, Wesley C -- Hourlier, Thibaut -- Aken, Bronwen L -- Searle, Stephen M J -- Adelson, David L -- Bian, Chao -- Cam, Graham R -- Chen, Yulin -- Cheng, Shifeng -- DeSilva, Udaya -- Dixen, Karen -- Dong, Yang -- Fan, Guangyi -- Franklin, Ian R -- Fu, Shaoyin -- Fuentes-Utrilla, Pablo -- Guan, Rui -- Highland, Margaret A -- Holder, Michael E -- Huang, Guodong -- Ingham, Aaron B -- Jhangiani, Shalini N -- Kalra, Divya -- Kovar, Christie L -- Lee, Sandra L -- Liu, Weiqing -- Liu, Xin -- Lu, Changxin -- Lv, Tian -- Mathew, Tittu -- McWilliam, Sean -- Menzies, Moira -- Pan, Shengkai -- Robelin, David -- Servin, Bertrand -- Townley, David -- Wang, Wenliang -- Wei, Bin -- White, Stephen N -- Yang, Xinhua -- Ye, Chen -- Yue, Yaojing -- Zeng, Peng -- Zhou, Qing -- Hansen, Jacob B -- Kristiansen, Karsten -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Flicek, Paul -- Warkup, Christopher C -- Jones, Huw E -- Oddy, V Hutton -- Nicholas, Frank W -- McEwan, John C -- Kijas, James W -- Wang, Jun -- Worley, Kim C -- Archibald, Alan L -- Cockett, Noelle -- Xu, Xun -- Wang, Wen -- Dalrymple, Brian P -- 095908/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 098051/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- BB/1025360/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/I025328/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/I025360/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/I025506/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- WT095908/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- WT098051/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jun 6;344(6188):1168-73. doi: 10.1126/science.1252806.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223, China. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Animal Food and Health Sciences, St Lucia, QLD 4067, Australia. College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. ; Ediburgh Genomics, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK. ; Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-4815, USA. ; Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Laboratoire de Genetique Cellulaire, UMR 444, Castanet-Tolosan F-31326, France. ; Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-1435, USA. ; Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223, China. Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, Hohhot 010018, China. Institute of ATCG, Nei Mongol Bio-Information, Hohhot, China. ; Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand. ; AgResearch, Invermay Agricultural Centre, Mosgiel 9053, New Zealand. ; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Animal Food and Health Sciences, St Lucia, QLD 4067, Australia. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK. European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK. ; College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China. ; Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark. ; State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223, China. ; Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, Hohhot 010018, China. ; U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Animal Disease Research Unit, Pullman, WA 99164, USA. Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. Maize Research Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China. ; Lanzhou Institute of Husbandry and Pharmaceutical Science, Lanzhou, 730050, China. ; Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. ; European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK. ; Biosciences Knowledge Transfer Network, The Roslin Institute, Easter Bush, Midlothian, EH25 9RG, UK. ; School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia. ; Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. Princess Al Jawhara Center of Excellence in the Research of Hereditary Disorders, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia. Macau University of Science and Technology, Macau 999078, China. ; Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. brian.dalrymple@csiro.au wwang@mail.kiz.ac.cn xuxun@genomics.cn alan.archibald@roslin.ed.ac.uk kworley@bcm.edu noelle.cockett@usu.edu. ; The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK. brian.dalrymple@csiro.au wwang@mail.kiz.ac.cn xuxun@genomics.cn alan.archibald@roslin.ed.ac.uk kworley@bcm.edu noelle.cockett@usu.edu. ; Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-1435, USA. brian.dalrymple@csiro.au wwang@mail.kiz.ac.cn xuxun@genomics.cn alan.archibald@roslin.ed.ac.uk kworley@bcm.edu noelle.cockett@usu.edu. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. brian.dalrymple@csiro.au wwang@mail.kiz.ac.cn xuxun@genomics.cn alan.archibald@roslin.ed.ac.uk kworley@bcm.edu noelle.cockett@usu.edu. ; State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223, China. brian.dalrymple@csiro.au wwang@mail.kiz.ac.cn xuxun@genomics.cn alan.archibald@roslin.ed.ac.uk kworley@bcm.edu noelle.cockett@usu.edu. ; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Animal Food and Health Sciences, St Lucia, QLD 4067, Australia. brian.dalrymple@csiro.au wwang@mail.kiz.ac.cn xuxun@genomics.cn alan.archibald@roslin.ed.ac.uk kworley@bcm.edu noelle.cockett@usu.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24904168" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Fatty Acids, Volatile/metabolism/physiology ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Genome ; Keratins, Hair-Specific/genetics ; Lipid Metabolism/genetics/*physiology ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Phylogeny ; Rumen/metabolism/*physiology ; Sheep, Domestic/classification/*genetics/*metabolism ; Transcriptome ; Wool/growth & development
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2011-07-29
    Description: The magnesium ion, Mg(2+), is essential for all life as a cofactor for ATP, polyphosphates such as DNA and RNA, and metabolic enzymes, but whether it plays a part in intracellular signalling (as Ca(2+) does) is unknown. Here we identify mutations in the magnesium transporter gene, MAGT1, in a novel X-linked human immunodeficiency characterized by CD4 lymphopenia, severe chronic viral infections, and defective T-lymphocyte activation. We demonstrate that a rapid transient Mg(2+) influx is induced by antigen receptor stimulation in normal T cells and by growth factor stimulation in non-lymphoid cells. MAGT1 deficiency abrogates the Mg(2+) influx, leading to impaired responses to antigen receptor engagement, including defective activation of phospholipase Cgamma1 and a markedly impaired Ca(2+) influx in T cells but not B cells. These observations reveal a role for Mg(2+) as an intracellular second messenger coupling cell-surface receptor activation to intracellular effectors and identify MAGT1 as a possible target for novel therapeutics.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3159560/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3159560/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Feng-Yen -- Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin -- Kanellopoulou, Chrysi -- Davis, Jeremiah C -- Matthews, Helen F -- Douek, Daniel C -- Cohen, Jeffrey I -- Uzel, Gulbu -- Su, Helen C -- Lenardo, Michael J -- ZIA AI000769-14/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA AI000769-15/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Jul 27;475(7357):471-6. doi: 10.1038/nature10246.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Molecular Development Section, Lymphocyte Molecular Genetics Unit, Laboratory of Immunology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21796205" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Calcium/immunology ; Cation Transport Proteins/genetics ; Female ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Magnesium/*immunology ; Male ; Phospholipase C gamma/genetics/metabolism ; Second Messenger Systems/*immunology ; T-Lymphocytes/*immunology ; T-Lymphocytopenia, Idiopathic CD4-Positive/genetics/*immunology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2011-07-12
    Description: Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is the world's most important non-grain food crop and is central to global food security. It is clonally propagated, highly heterozygous, autotetraploid, and suffers acute inbreeding depression. Here we use a homozygous doubled-monoploid potato clone to sequence and assemble 86% of the 844-megabase genome. We predict 39,031 protein-coding genes and present evidence for at least two genome duplication events indicative of a palaeopolyploid origin. As the first genome sequence of an asterid, the potato genome reveals 2,642 genes specific to this large angiosperm clade. We also sequenced a heterozygous diploid clone and show that gene presence/absence variants and other potentially deleterious mutations occur frequently and are a likely cause of inbreeding depression. Gene family expansion, tissue-specific expression and recruitment of genes to new pathways contributed to the evolution of tuber development. The potato genome sequence provides a platform for genetic improvement of this vital crop.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Potato Genome Sequencing Consortium -- Xu, Xun -- Pan, Shengkai -- Cheng, Shifeng -- Zhang, Bo -- Mu, Desheng -- Ni, Peixiang -- Zhang, Gengyun -- Yang, Shuang -- Li, Ruiqiang -- Wang, Jun -- Orjeda, Gisella -- Guzman, Frank -- Torres, Michael -- Lozano, Roberto -- Ponce, Olga -- Martinez, Diana -- De la Cruz, German -- Chakrabarti, S K -- Patil, Virupaksh U -- Skryabin, Konstantin G -- Kuznetsov, Boris B -- Ravin, Nikolai V -- Kolganova, Tatjana V -- Beletsky, Alexey V -- Mardanov, Andrei V -- Di Genova, Alex -- Bolser, Daniel M -- Martin, David M A -- Li, Guangcun -- Yang, Yu -- Kuang, Hanhui -- Hu, Qun -- Xiong, Xingyao -- Bishop, Gerard J -- Sagredo, Boris -- Mejia, Nilo -- Zagorski, Wlodzimierz -- Gromadka, Robert -- Gawor, Jan -- Szczesny, Pawel -- Huang, Sanwen -- Zhang, Zhonghua -- Liang, Chunbo -- He, Jun -- Li, Ying -- He, Ying -- Xu, Jianfei -- Zhang, Youjun -- Xie, Binyan -- Du, Yongchen -- Qu, Dongyu -- Bonierbale, Merideth -- Ghislain, Marc -- Herrera, Maria del Rosario -- Giuliano, Giovanni -- Pietrella, Marco -- Perrotta, Gaetano -- Facella, Paolo -- O'Brien, Kimberly -- Feingold, Sergio E -- Barreiro, Leandro E -- Massa, Gabriela A -- Diambra, Luis -- Whitty, Brett R -- Vaillancourt, Brieanne -- Lin, Haining -- Massa, Alicia N -- Geoffroy, Michael -- Lundback, Steven -- DellaPenna, Dean -- Buell, C Robin -- Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar -- Marshall, David F -- Waugh, Robbie -- Bryan, Glenn J -- Destefanis, Marialaura -- Nagy, Istvan -- Milbourne, Dan -- Thomson, Susan J -- Fiers, Mark -- Jacobs, Jeanne M E -- Nielsen, Kare L -- Sonderkaer, Mads -- Iovene, Marina -- Torres, Giovana A -- Jiang, Jiming -- Veilleux, Richard E -- Bachem, Christian W B -- de Boer, Jan -- Borm, Theo -- Kloosterman, Bjorn -- van Eck, Herman -- Datema, Erwin -- Hekkert, Bas te Lintel -- Goverse, Aska -- van Ham, Roeland C H J -- Visser, Richard G F -- BB/F012640/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/F012640/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- WT 083481/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2011 Jul 10;475(7355):189-95. doi: 10.1038/nature10158.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉BGI-Shenzhen, Chinese Ministry of Agricultural, Key Lab of Genomics, Beishan Industrial Zone, Yantian District, Shenzhen 518083, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21743474" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Duplication ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant ; Genes, Plant/genetics ; Genetic Variation ; Genome, Plant/*genetics ; *Genomics ; Haplotypes/genetics ; Heterozygote ; Homozygote ; Immunity, Innate ; Inbreeding ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Plant Diseases/genetics ; Ploidies ; Solanum tuberosum/*genetics/physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2014-02-21
    Description: Members of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) family of transcriptional regulators are central mediators of the cellular inflammatory response. Although constitutive NF-kappaB signalling is present in most human tumours, mutations in pathway members are rare, complicating efforts to understand and block aberrant NF-kappaB activity in cancer. Here we show that more than two-thirds of supratentorial ependymomas contain oncogenic fusions between RELA, the principal effector of canonical NF-kappaB signalling, and an uncharacterized gene, C11orf95. In each case, C11orf95-RELA fusions resulted from chromothripsis involving chromosome 11q13.1. C11orf95-RELA fusion proteins translocated spontaneously to the nucleus to activate NF-kappaB target genes, and rapidly transformed neural stem cells--the cell of origin of ependymoma--to form these tumours in mice. Our data identify a highly recurrent genetic alteration of RELA in human cancer, and the C11orf95-RELA fusion protein as a potential therapeutic target in supratentorial ependymoma.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4050669/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4050669/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Parker, Matthew -- Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M -- Punchihewa, Chandanamali -- Weinlich, Ricardo -- Dalton, James D -- Li, Yongjin -- Lee, Ryan -- Tatevossian, Ruth G -- Phoenix, Timothy N -- Thiruvenkatam, Radhika -- White, Elsie -- Tang, Bo -- Orisme, Wilda -- Gupta, Kirti -- Rusch, Michael -- Chen, Xiang -- Li, Yuxin -- Nagahawhatte, Panduka -- Hedlund, Erin -- Finkelstein, David -- Wu, Gang -- Shurtleff, Sheila -- Easton, John -- Boggs, Kristy -- Yergeau, Donald -- Vadodaria, Bhavin -- Mulder, Heather L -- Becksfort, Jared -- Gupta, Pankaj -- Huether, Robert -- Ma, Jing -- Song, Guangchun -- Gajjar, Amar -- Merchant, Thomas -- Boop, Frederick -- Smith, Amy A -- Ding, Li -- Lu, Charles -- Ochoa, Kerri -- Zhao, David -- Fulton, Robert S -- Fulton, Lucinda L -- Mardis, Elaine R -- Wilson, Richard K -- Downing, James R -- Green, Douglas R -- Zhang, Jinghui -- Ellison, David W -- Gilbertson, Richard J -- P01 CA096832/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01CA96832/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA021765/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30CA021765/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129541/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA129541/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Feb 27;506(7489):451-5. doi: 10.1038/nature13109. Epub 2014 Feb 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] St. Jude Children's Research Hospital - Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [2] Department of Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [3]. ; 1] Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Pathology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Immunology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [2]. ; 1] St. Jude Children's Research Hospital - Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [2] Department of Pathology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; 1] St. Jude Children's Research Hospital - Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [2] Department of Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; Department of Pathology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; Department of Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; 1] Department of Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [2] Structural Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital - Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; Structural Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; 1] St. Jude Children's Research Hospital - Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [2] Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; Department of Surgery, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; MD Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, 92 West Miller MP 318, Orlando, Florida 32806, USA. ; 1] St. Jude Children's Research Hospital - Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [2] The Genome Institute, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA [3] Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. ; 1] St. Jude Children's Research Hospital - Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [2] The Genome Institute, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. ; 1] St. Jude Children's Research Hospital - Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [2] The Genome Institute, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA [3] Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA [4] Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. ; Department of Immunology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; 1] St. Jude Children's Research Hospital - Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA [2] Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24553141" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics/metabolism ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Brain Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/pathology ; Cell Line ; Cell Nucleus/metabolism ; *Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11/genetics ; Ependymoma/*genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Female ; Humans ; Mice ; Models, Genetic ; Molecular Sequence Data ; NF-kappa B/genetics/*metabolism ; Neural Stem Cells/metabolism/pathology ; Oncogene Proteins, Fusion/genetics/metabolism ; Phosphoproteins/genetics/metabolism ; Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; *Signal Transduction ; Transcription Factor RelA/genetics/*metabolism ; Translocation, Genetic/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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