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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-10-29
    Description: Cytotoxic chemotherapy targets elements common to all nucleated human cells, such as DNA and microtubules, yet it selectively kills tumor cells. Here we show that clinical response to these drugs correlates with, and may be partially governed by, the pretreatment proximity of tumor cell mitochondria to the apoptotic threshold, a property called mitochondrial priming. We used BH3 profiling to measure priming in tumor cells from patients with multiple myeloma, acute myelogenous and lymphoblastic leukemia, and ovarian cancer. This assay measures mitochondrial response to peptides derived from proapoptotic BH3 domains of proteins critical for death signaling to mitochondria. Patients with highly primed cancers exhibited superior clinical response to chemotherapy. In contrast, chemoresistant cancers and normal tissues were poorly primed. Manipulation of mitochondrial priming might enhance the efficacy of cytotoxic agents.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3280949/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3280949/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ni Chonghaile, Triona -- Sarosiek, Kristopher A -- Vo, Thanh-Trang -- Ryan, Jeremy A -- Tammareddi, Anupama -- Moore, Victoria Del Gaizo -- Deng, Jing -- Anderson, Kenneth C -- Richardson, Paul -- Tai, Yu-Tzu -- Mitsiades, Constantine S -- Matulonis, Ursula A -- Drapkin, Ronny -- Stone, Richard -- Deangelo, Daniel J -- McConkey, David J -- Sallan, Stephen E -- Silverman, Lewis -- Hirsch, Michelle S -- Carrasco, Daniel Ruben -- Letai, Anthony -- P01CA068484/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01CA139980/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129974/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129974-05/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA129974/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Nov 25;334(6059):1129-33. doi: 10.1126/science.1206727. Epub 2011 Oct 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22033517" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Aged ; Animals ; Antineoplastic Agents/*therapeutic use ; *Apoptosis ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation ; Child ; Disease-Free Survival ; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm ; Female ; Humans ; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/drug therapy/physiopathology ; Male ; Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Middle Aged ; Mitochondria/*physiology ; Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy/physiopathology ; Neoplasms/*drug therapy/*physiopathology ; Ovarian Neoplasms/drug therapy/physiopathology ; Peptide Fragments/metabolism ; Permeability ; Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/drug therapy/physiopathology ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2/chemistry/metabolism ; Remission Induction ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-08-26
    Description: Genetic manipulations of insect populations for pest control have been advocated for some time, but there are few cases where manipulated individuals have been released in the field and no cases where they have successfully invaded target populations. Population transformation using the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia is particularly attractive because this maternally-inherited agent provides a powerful mechanism to invade natural populations through cytoplasmic incompatibility. When Wolbachia are introduced into mosquitoes, they interfere with pathogen transmission and influence key life history traits such as lifespan. Here we describe how the wMel Wolbachia infection, introduced into the dengue vector Aedes aegypti from Drosophila melanogaster, successfully invaded two natural A. aegypti populations in Australia, reaching near-fixation in a few months following releases of wMel-infected A. aegypti adults. Models with plausible parameter values indicate that Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes suffered relatively small fitness costs, leading to an unstable equilibrium frequency 〈30% that must be exceeded for invasion. These findings demonstrate that Wolbachia-based strategies can be deployed as a practical approach to dengue suppression with potential for area-wide implementation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hoffmann, A A -- Montgomery, B L -- Popovici, J -- Iturbe-Ormaetxe, I -- Johnson, P H -- Muzzi, F -- Greenfield, M -- Durkan, M -- Leong, Y S -- Dong, Y -- Cook, H -- Axford, J -- Callahan, A G -- Kenny, N -- Omodei, C -- McGraw, E A -- Ryan, P A -- Ritchie, S A -- Turelli, M -- O'Neill, S L -- England -- Nature. 2011 Aug 24;476(7361):454-7. doi: 10.1038/nature10356.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Bio21 Institute, Department of Genetics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21866160" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aedes/*microbiology/physiology/*virology ; Animals ; Dengue/microbiology/*prevention & control/*transmission/virology ; Dengue Virus/isolation & purification/*physiology ; Drosophila melanogaster/microbiology ; Female ; Humans ; Insect Vectors/microbiology/physiology/virology ; Male ; Pest Control, Biological/*methods ; Queensland ; Time Factors ; Wolbachia/isolation & purification/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-01-24
    Description: Sexually dimorphic mammalian tissues, including sexual organs and the brain, contain stem cells that are directly or indirectly regulated by sex hormones. An important question is whether stem cells also exhibit sex differences in physiological function and hormonal regulation in tissues that do not show sex-specific morphological differences. The terminal differentiation and function of some haematopoietic cells are regulated by sex hormones, but haematopoietic stem-cell function is thought to be similar in both sexes. Here we show that mouse haematopoietic stem cells exhibit sex differences in cell-cycle regulation by oestrogen. Haematopoietic stem cells in female mice divide significantly more frequently than in male mice. This difference depends on the ovaries but not the testes. Administration of oestradiol, a hormone produced mainly in the ovaries, increased haematopoietic stem-cell division in males and females. Oestrogen levels increased during pregnancy, increasing haematopoietic stem-cell division, haematopoietic stem-cell frequency, cellularity, and erythropoiesis in the spleen. Haematopoietic stem cells expressed high levels of oestrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha). Conditional deletion of ERalpha from haematopoietic stem cells reduced haematopoietic stem-cell division in female, but not male, mice and attenuated the increases in haematopoietic stem-cell division, haematopoietic stem-cell frequency, and erythropoiesis during pregnancy. Oestrogen/ERalpha signalling promotes haematopoietic stem-cell self-renewal, expanding splenic haematopoietic stem cells and erythropoiesis during pregnancy.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4015622/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4015622/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Nakada, Daisuke -- Oguro, Hideyuki -- Levi, Boaz P -- Ryan, Nicole -- Kitano, Ayumi -- Saitoh, Yusuke -- Takeichi, Makiko -- Wendt, George R -- Morrison, Sean J -- HL097760/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- NCI P30CA125123/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- NIAID AI036211/PHS HHS/ -- R01 HL097760/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- S10RR024574/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM008014/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jan 23;505(7484):555-8. doi: 10.1038/nature12932.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Pediatrics, and Children's Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; Life Sciences Institute, Center for Stem Cell Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; 1] Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2]. ; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24451543" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Count ; Cell Division/drug effects ; Erythropoiesis ; Estrogen Receptor alpha/metabolism ; Estrogens/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Female ; Hematopoietic Stem Cells/*cytology/drug effects/*metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Ovary/drug effects/metabolism ; Pregnancy ; Sex Characteristics ; Signal Transduction/drug effects ; Spleen/cytology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-07-17
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Gross, Susan J -- Kareht, Stephanie -- Ryan, Allison -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 16;523(7560):290. doi: 10.1038/523290d.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Natera, San Carlos, California, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26178955" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Female ; Humans ; *Incidental Findings ; Maternal Welfare/*statistics & numerical data ; Pregnancy ; Pregnancy Complications/*diagnosis ; Prenatal Diagnosis/*utilization
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-08-06
    Description: Psychophysics measures the relationship between a stimulus's physical magnitude and its perceived magnitude. Because decisions are based on perception of stimuli, this relationship is critical to understanding decision-making. We tested whether psychophysical laws explain how female tungara frogs (Physalaemus pustulosus) and frog-eating bats (Trachops cirrhosus) compare male frog calls, and how this imposes selection on call evolution. Although both frogs and bats prefer more elaborate calls, they are less selective as call elaboration increases, because preference is based on stimulus ratios. Thus, as call elaboration increases, both relative attractiveness and relative predation risk decrease because of how receivers perceive and compare stimuli. Our data show that female cognition can limit the evolution of sexual signal elaboration.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Akre, Karin L -- Farris, Hamilton E -- Lea, Amanda M -- Page, Rachel A -- Ryan, Michael J -- P20 RR016816/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P20RR016816/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Aug 5;333(6043):751-2. doi: 10.1126/science.1205623.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Section of Integrative Biology, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA. kakre@mail.utexas.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21817052" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anura/*physiology ; *Auditory Perception ; *Biological Evolution ; Chiroptera/*physiology ; Cognition ; Female ; Male ; *Mating Preference, Animal ; Predatory Behavior ; Selection, Genetic ; *Vocalization, Animal
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-09-01
    Description: Mate choice models derive from traditional microeconomic decision theory and assume that individuals maximize their Darwinian fitness by making economically rational decisions. Rational choices exhibit regularity, whereby the relative strength of preferences between options remains stable when additional options are presented. We tested female frogs with three simulated males who differed in relative call attractiveness and call rate. In binary choice tests, females' preferences favored stimulus caller B over caller A; however, with the addition of an inferior "decoy" C, females reversed their preferences and chose A over B. These results show that the relative valuation of mates is not independent of inferior alternatives in the choice set and therefore cannot be explained with the rational choice models currently used in sexual selection theory.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lea, Amanda M -- Ryan, Michael J -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Aug 28;349(6251):964-6. doi: 10.1126/science.aab2012.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Integrative Biology, The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA. alea@utexas.edu. ; Department of Integrative Biology, The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA. Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 0843-03092, Balboa, Ancon, Republic of Panama.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26315434" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anura/*physiology ; Choice Behavior ; Female ; Male ; *Mating Preference, Animal ; Vocalization, Animal
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2015-04-11
    Description: Aneuploidy, the inheritance of an atypical chromosome complement, is common in early human development and is the primary cause of pregnancy loss. By screening day-3 embryos during in vitro fertilization cycles, we identified an association between aneuploidy of putative mitotic origin and linked genetic variants on chromosome 4 of maternal genomes. This associated region contains a candidate gene, Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4), that plays a well-characterized role in centriole duplication and has the ability to alter mitotic fidelity upon minor dysregulation. Mothers with the high-risk genotypes contributed fewer embryos for testing at day 5, suggesting that their embryos are less likely to survive to blastocyst formation. The associated region coincides with a signature of a selective sweep in ancient humans, suggesting that the causal variant was either the target of selection or hitchhiked to substantial frequency.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉McCoy, Rajiv C -- Demko, Zachary -- Ryan, Allison -- Banjevic, Milena -- Hill, Matthew -- Sigurjonsson, Styrmir -- Rabinowitz, Matthew -- Fraser, Hunter B -- Petrov, Dmitri A -- R01 GM089926/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM097415/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM100366/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Apr 10;348(6231):235-8. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa3337.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. ; Natera, Inc., San Carlos, CA, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25859044" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; *Aneuploidy ; Blastomeres ; Embryo, Mammalian/*physiology ; Embryonic Development ; Fathers ; Female ; Fertilization in Vitro ; Genetic Association Studies ; Genetic Testing ; Haplotypes ; Humans ; Male ; *Mitosis ; Mothers ; Phenotype ; *Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/*genetics/physiology ; Selection, Genetic ; Trophoblasts
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    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2013-06-08
    Description: Sexual signals are often complex and perceived by multiple senses. How animals integrate signal components across sensory modalities can influence signal evolution. Here we show that two relatively unattractive signals that are perceived acoustically and visually can be combined in a pattern to form a signal that is attractive to female tungara frogs. Such unanticipated perceptual effects suggest that the evolution of complex signals can occur by alteration of the relationships among already-existing traits.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Taylor, R C -- Ryan, M J -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Jul 19;341(6143):273-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1237113. Epub 2013 Jun 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biology, Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD 21801, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23744778" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anura/*physiology ; Female ; Male ; *Mating Preference, Animal ; *Vocalization, Animal
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-01-25
    Description: Animal displays are often perceived by intended and unintended receivers in more than one sensory system. In addition, cues that are an incidental consequence of signal production can also be perceived by different receivers, even when the receivers use different sensory systems to perceive them. Here we show that the vocal responses of male tungara frogs (Physalaemus pustulosus) increase twofold when call-induced water ripples are added to the acoustic component of a rival's call. Hunting bats (Trachops cirrhosus) can echolocate this signal by-product and prefer to attack model frogs when ripples are added to the acoustic component of the call. This study illustrates how the perception of a signal by-product by intended and unintended receivers through different sensory systems generates both costs and benefits for the signaler.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Halfwerk, W -- Jones, P L -- Taylor, R C -- Ryan, M J -- Page, R A -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jan 24;343(6169):413-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1244812.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 0843-03092, Balboa, Ancon, Republic of Panama.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24458640" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anura/*physiology ; *Auditory Perception ; Chiroptera/*physiology ; *Courtship ; *Echolocation ; Female ; Male ; *Mating Preference, Animal ; Sound ; *Vibration ; *Vocalization, Animal ; Water
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    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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