Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • *Synaptic Transmission  (1)
  • Flow Cytometry  (1)
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  (2)
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-07-15
    Description: Immune cells function in an interacting hierarchy that coordinates the activities of various cell types according to genetic and environmental contexts. We developed graphical approaches to construct an extensible immune reference map from mass cytometry data of cells from different organs, incorporating landmark cell populations as flags on the map to compare cells from distinct samples. The maps recapitulated canonical cellular phenotypes and revealed reproducible, tissue-specific deviations. The approach revealed influences of genetic variation and circadian rhythms on immune system structure, enabled direct comparisons of murine and human blood cell phenotypes, and even enabled archival fluorescence-based flow cytometry data to be mapped onto the reference framework. This foundational reference map provides a working definition of systemic immune organization to which new data can be integrated to reveal deviations driven by genetics, environment, or pathology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4537647/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4537647/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Spitzer, Matthew H -- Gherardini, Pier Federico -- Fragiadakis, Gabriela K -- Bhattacharya, Nupur -- Yuan, Robert T -- Hotson, Andrew N -- Finck, Rachel -- Carmi, Yaron -- Zunder, Eli R -- Fantl, Wendy J -- Bendall, Sean C -- Engleman, Edgar G -- Nolan, Garry P -- 1R01CA130826/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 1R01GM109836/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- 1R01NS089533/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- 1U19AI100627/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 201303028/PHS HHS/ -- 5-24927/PHS HHS/ -- 5R01AI073724/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 5U54CA143907/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 7500108142/PHS HHS/ -- F31 CA189331/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F31CA189331/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F32 GM093508/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- F32 GM093508-01/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- HHSF223201210194C/PHS HHS/ -- HHSN268201000034C/HV/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- HHSN272200700038C/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- HHSN272200700038C/PHS HHS/ -- HHSN272201200028C/PHS HHS/ -- K99 GM104148/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- K99GM104148-01/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- N01-HV-00242/HV/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA034233/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA034233-22A1/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- PN2 EY018228/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- PN2EY018228 0158 G KB065/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI073724/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA130826/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA184968/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM109836/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS089533/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01CA184968/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R33 CA183654/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R33 CA183692/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- RFA CA 09-009/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- RFA CA 09-011/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007276/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32GM007276/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI057229/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI100627/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 CA149145/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54CA149145/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jul 10;349(6244):1259425. doi: 10.1126/science.1259425.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Baxter Laboratory in Stem Cell Biology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Program in Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. gnolan@stanford.edu matthew.spitzer@stanford.edu. ; Baxter Laboratory in Stem Cell Biology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Program in Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Baxter Laboratory in Stem Cell Biology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Program in Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. gnolan@stanford.edu matthew.spitzer@stanford.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26160952" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Bone Marrow/immunology ; Circadian Rhythm/immunology ; Flow Cytometry ; Genetic Variation ; Humans ; Immune System/*cytology/*immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Models, Biological ; Phenotype ; Reference Standards
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-04-27
    Description: Neurotransmitters have been thought to be fixed throughout life, but whether sensory stimuli alter behaviorally relevant transmitter expression in the mature brain is unknown. We found that populations of interneurons in the adult rat hypothalamus switched between dopamine and somatostatin expression in response to exposure to short- and long-day photoperiods. Changes in postsynaptic dopamine receptor expression matched changes in presynaptic dopamine, whereas somatostatin receptor expression remained constant. Pharmacological blockade or ablation of these dopaminergic neurons led to anxious and depressed behavior, phenocopying performance after exposure to the long-day photoperiod. Induction of newly dopaminergic neurons through exposure to the short-day photoperiod rescued the behavioral consequences of lesions. Natural stimulation of other sensory modalities may cause changes in transmitter expression that regulate different behaviors.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Dulcis, Davide -- Jamshidi, Pouya -- Leutgeb, Stefan -- Spitzer, Nicholas C -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Apr 26;340(6131):449-53. doi: 10.1126/science.1234152.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Neurobiology Section, Division of Biological Sciences and Center for Neural Circuits and Behavior, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0357, USA. ddulcis@gmail.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23620046" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Behavior, Animal/*physiology ; Brain/metabolism/*physiology ; Cell Count ; Dopamine/*metabolism ; Dopaminergic Neurons/metabolism/*physiology ; Hypothalamus/metabolism/physiology ; Male ; Maze Learning ; *Photoperiod ; Rats ; Rats, Long-Evans ; Receptors, Dopamine/metabolism ; Receptors, Somatostatin/metabolism ; Seasons ; Somatostatin/*metabolism ; Stress, Psychological/*psychology ; *Synaptic Transmission
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...