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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; SURVIVAL ; BLOOD ; human ; COHORT ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; DESIGN ; genetics ; SNP ; RATES ; case-control studies ; INDIVIDUALS ; pancreatic cancer ; MAPS ; case control study ; case-control study ; WORLDWIDE ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; VARIANT ; SNPs ; EPIDEMIOLOGIC EVIDENCE ; USA ; prospective ; BASE-LINE CHARACTERISTICS ; BLOOD-GROUP ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; WOMENS HEALTH ; Genetic ; Genome-wide association studies ; ALLERGIES ; CONFIDENCE ; RATIONALE
    Abstract: We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study of pancreatic cancer, a cancer with one of the lowest survival rates worldwide. We genotyped 558,542 SNPs in 1,896 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 1,939 controls drawn from 12 prospective cohorts plus one hospital-based casecontrol study. We conducted a combined analysis of these groups plus an additional 2,457 affected individuals and 2,654 controls from eight case-control studies, adjusting for study, sex, ancestry and five principal components. We identified an association between a locus on 9q34 and pancreatic cancer marked by the SNP rs505922 (combined P = 5.37 x 10(-8); multiplicative per-allele odds ratio 1.20; 95% confidence interval 1.12-1.28). This SNP maps to the first intron of the ABO blood group gene. Our results are consistent with earlier epidemiologic evidence suggesting that people with blood group O may have a lower risk of pancreatic cancer than those with groups A or B
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19648918
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; LUNG ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; cohort study ; RISK ; GENE ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; BREAST-CANCER ; AGE ; genetics ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; REGION ; telomerase ; case-control study ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; prospective ; BASE-LINE CHARACTERISTICS ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; WOMENS HEALTH ; Genetic ; RECOMBINATION HOTSPOTS
    Abstract: We conducted a genome-wide association study of pancreatic cancer in 3,851 affected individuals (cases) and 3,934 unaffected controls drawn from 12 prospective cohort studies and 8 case-control studies. Based on a logistic regression model for genotype trend effect that was adjusted for study, age, sex, self-described ancestry and five principal components, we identified eight SNPs that map to three loci on chromosomes 13q22.1, 1q32.1 and 5p15.33. Two correlated SNPs, rs9543325 (P = 3.27 x 10(-11), per-allele odds ratio (OR) 1.26, 95% CI 1.18-1.35) and rs9564966 (P = 5.86 x 10(-8), per-allele OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.13-1.30), map to a nongenic region on chromosome 13q22.1. Five SNPs on 1q32.1 map to NR5A2, and the strongest signal was at rs3790844 (P = 2.45 x 10(-10), per-allele OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.71-0.84). A single SNP, rs401681 (P = 3.66 x 10(-7), per-allele OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.11-1.27), maps to the CLPTM1L-TERT locus on 5p15.33, which is associated with multiple cancers. Our study has identified common susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer that warrant follow-up studies
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20101243
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; COHORT ; RISK ; GENE ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; HEALTH ; COLON-CANCER ; ALCOHOL ; CONSUMPTION ; FRUIT ; LIFE-STYLE ; MASS INDEX ; CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; METAANALYSIS ; VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION ; LOCI ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; sex ; SCAN ; RISK LOCI ; CHROMOSOME 8Q24
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than a dozen loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Here, we examined potential effect-modification between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at 10 of these loci and probable or established environmental risk factors for CRC in 7,016 CRC cases and 9,723 controls from nine cohort and case-control studies. We used meta-analysis of an efficient empirical-Bayes estimator to detect potential multiplicative interactions between each of the SNPs [rs16892766 at8q23.3 (EIF3H/UTP23), rs6983267 at 8q24 (MYC), rs10795668 at 10p14 (FLJ3802842), rs3802842 at 11q23 (LOC120376), rs4444235 at 14q22.2 (BMP4), rs4779584 at 15q13 (GREM1), rs9929218 at 16q22.1 (CDH1), rs4939827 at 18q21 (SMAD7), rs10411210 at 19q13.1 (RHPN2), and rs961253 at 20p12.3 (BMP2)] and select major CRC risk factors (sex, body mass index, height, smoking status, aspirin/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, alcohol use, and dietary intake of calcium, folate, red meat, processed meat, vegetables, fruit, and fiber). The strongest statistical evidence for a gene-environment interaction across studies was for vegetable consumption and rs16892766, located on chromosome 8q23.3, near the EIF3H and UTP23 genes (nominal P-interaction = 1.3 x 10(-4); adjusted P = 0.02). The magnitude of the main effect of the SNP increased with increasing levels of vegetable consumption. No other interactions were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Overall, the association of most CRC susceptibility loci identified in initial GWAS seems to be invariant to the other risk factors considered; however, our results suggest potential modification of the rs16892766 effect by vegetable consumption.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22367214
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  • 4
    Keywords: DISEASES ; GENE ; METAANALYSIS ; INFERENCE ; 8Q24 ; susceptibility loci ; SCAN ; COMMON VARIANTS ; 5P15.33 ; MULTILOCUS GENOTYPE DATA ; RARE VARIANTS
    Abstract: Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified novel susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer. To follow up on these findings, and try to identify novel colorectal cancer susceptibility loci, we present results for GWAS of colorectal cancer (2,906 cases, 3,416 controls) that have not previously published main associations. Specifically, we calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals using log-additive models for each study. In order to improve our power to detect novel colorectal cancer susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis combining the results across studies. We selected the most statistically significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for replication using ten independent studies (8,161 cases and 9,101 controls). We again used a meta-analysis to summarize results for the replication studies alone, and for a combined analysis of GWAS and replication studies. We measured ten SNPs previously identified in colorectal cancer susceptibility loci and found eight to be associated with colorectal cancer (p value range 0.02 to 1.8 x 10(-8)). When we excluded studies that have previously published on these SNPs, five SNPs remained significant at p 〈 0.05 in the combined analysis. No novel susceptibility loci were significant in the replication study after adjustment for multiple testing, and none reached genome-wide significance from a combined analysis of GWAS and replication. We observed marginally significant evidence for a second independent SNP in the BMP2 region at chromosomal location 20p12 (rs4813802; replication p value 0.03; combined p value 7.3 x 10(-5)). In a region on 5p33.15, which includes the coding regions of the TERT-CLPTM1L genes and has been identified in GWAS to be associated with susceptibility to at least seven other cancers, we observed a marginally significant association with rs2853668 (replication p value 0.03; combined p value 1.9 x 10(-4)). Our study suggests a complex nature of the contribution of common genetic variants to risk for colorectal cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21761138
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