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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; PROTECTION ; MODEL ; DISEASE ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; HISTORY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; SAMPLE ; FAMILY ; RISK-FACTORS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; AGE ; BRCA1 ; case-only design ; family history ; gene carrier probability ; LINKAGE ANALYSIS ; mixture logistic model ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; population and sibling controls ; WOMEN
    Abstract: Background The effect of environmental/lifestyle factors on breast cancer risk may be modified by genetic predisposition. Methods In a population-based case-control-family study performed in Germany including 706 cases by age 50 years, 1381 population, and 252 sister controls, we investigated main effects for environmental/lifestyle factors and genetic susceptibility and gene-environment interaction (G x E). Different surrogate measures for genetic predisposition using pedigree information were used: first-degree family history of breast or ovarian cancer; and gene carrier probability using a genetic model based on rare dominant genes. Possible G x E interaction was studied by (1) logistic regression using cases and population controls including an interaction term; (2) comparing results using sister controls and population controls; (3) case-only analysis with logistic regression and (4) a mixture logistic model. Results Familial predisposition showed the strongest main effect and the estimated gene carrier probability gave the best fit. High parity and longer duration of breastfeeding reduced breast cancer risk significantly, a history of abortions increased risk and age at menarche showed no significant effect. We found significant G x E interaction between parity and genetic susceptibility using different surrogate measures. In women most likely to have a high genetic susceptibility, high parity was less protective. Later age at menarche was protective in women with a positive family history. No evidence for G x E interaction was found for breastfeeding and abortion. Conclusions These findings corroborate results from other studies and provide further evidence that the magnitude of protection from parity is reduced in women most likely to have a genetic risk in spite of the limitations of using surrogate genetic measures
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12690006
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; GENE ; GENOME ; MUTATIONS ; STEM-CELLS ; ZINC-FINGER PROTEIN ; T-CELL LYMPHOMAGENESIS ; MYC ; SUPER-ENHANCERS ; SUBGROUP
    Abstract: Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour currently treated with a combination of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, posing a considerable burden of toxicity to the developing child. Genomics has illuminated the extensive intertumoral heterogeneity of medulloblastoma, identifying four distinct molecular subgroups. Group 3 and group 4 subgroup medulloblastomas account for most paediatric cases; yet, oncogenic drivers for these subtypes remain largely unidentified. Here we describe a series of prevalent, highly disparate genomic structural variants, restricted to groups 3 and 4, resulting in specific and mutually exclusive activation of the growth factor independent 1 family proto-oncogenes, GFI1 and GFI1B. Somatic structural variants juxtapose GFI1 or GFI1B coding sequences proximal to active enhancer elements, including super-enhancers, instigating oncogenic activity. Our results, supported by evidence from mouse models, identify GFI1 and GFI1B as prominent medulloblastoma oncogenes and implicate 'enhancer hijacking' as an efficient mechanism driving oncogene activation in a childhood cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25043047
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  • 3
    Keywords: CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; proliferation ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; BLOOD ; CELL ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; KINASE ; THERAPY ; VIVO ; FOLLOW-UP ; SITE ; SITES ; GENE ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; transcription ; METABOLISM ; TRANSDUCTION ; gene transfer ; GENE-TRANSFER ; PATIENT ; DONOR ; TRANSPLANTATION ; CONTRAST ; SUFFICIENT ; treatment ; FREQUENCY ; FREQUENCIES ; TARGET ; CELL-SURVIVAL ; PATTERNS ; gene expression ; VECTOR ; LYMPHOCYTES ; HUMAN GENOME ; REGION ; REGIONS ; PROGENITOR CELLS ; IMMUNITY ; T-LYMPHOCYTES ; T lymphocyte ; CHILDREN ; PERIPHERAL-BLOOD ; T lymphocytes ; INTEGRATION ; PATTERN ; SEVERE COMBINED IMMUNODEFICIENCY ; LEVEL ; LONG ; progenitor ; EVENTS ; USA ; in vivo ; progenitor cell ; TRANSDUCED CELLS ; RECONSTITUTION ; RETROVIRAL GENE MARKING ; RETROVIRAL INTEGRATION ; MEDICINE ; VECTOR INTEGRATION ; PROGENITOR-CELL ; SCID-X1 ; ADA
    Abstract: We treated 10 children with X-linked SCID (SCID-X1) using gammaretrovirus-mediated gene transfer. Those with sufficient follow-up were found to have recovered substantial immunity in the absence of any serious adverse events up to 5 years after treatment. To determine the influence of vector integration on lymphoid reconstitution, we compared retroviral integration sites (RISs) from peripheral blood CD3(+) T lymphocytes of 5 patients taken between 9 and 30 months after transplantation with transduced CD34(+) progenitor cells derived from 1 further patient and I healthy donor. Integration occurred preferentially in gene regions on either side of transcription start sites, was clustered, and correlated with the expression level in CD34(+) progenitors during transduction. In contrast to those in CD34(+) cells, RISs recovered from engrafted CD3(+)T cells were significantly overrepresented within or near genes encoding proteins with kinase or transferase activity or involved in phosphorus metabolism. Although gross patterns of gene expression were unchanged in transduced cells, the divergence of RIS target frequency between transduced progenitor cells and post-thymic T lymphocytes indicates that vector integration influences cell survival, engraftment, or proliferation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17671654
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  • 4
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; GENE ; DIFFERENTIATION ; IDENTIFICATION ; EMBRYONIC STEM-CELLS ; HYPERMETHYLATION ; SUPPRESSOR ; methylome ; CANCER GENOME ; CPG ISLAND SHORES
    Abstract: Epigenetic alterations, that is, disruption of DNA methylation and chromatin architecture, are now acknowledged as a universal feature of tumorigenesis. Medulloblastoma, a clinically challenging, malignant childhood brain tumour, is no exception. Despite much progress from recent genomics studies, with recurrent changes identified in each of the four distinct tumour subgroups (WNT-pathway-activated, SHH-pathway-activated, and the less-well-characterized Group 3 and Group 4), many cases still lack an obvious genetic driver. Here we present whole-genome bisulphite-sequencing data from thirty-four human and five murine tumours plus eight human and three murine normal controls, augmented with matched whole-genome, RNA and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data. This comprehensive data set allowed us to decipher several features underlying the interplay between the genome, epigenome and transcriptome, and its effects on medulloblastoma pathophysiology. Most notable were highly prevalent regions of hypomethylation correlating with increased gene expression, extending tens of kilobases downstream of transcription start sites. Focal regions of low methylation linked to transcription-factor-binding sites shed light on differential transcriptional networks between subgroups, whereas increased methylation due to re-normalization of repressed chromatin in DNA methylation valleys was positively correlated with gene expression. Large, partially methylated domains affecting up to one-third of the genome showed increased mutation rates and gene silencing in a subgroup-specific fashion. Epigenetic alterations also affected novel medulloblastoma candidate genes (for example, LIN28B), resulting in alternative promoter usage and/or differential messenger RNA/microRNA expression. Analysis of mouse medulloblastoma and precursor-cell methylation demonstrated a somatic origin for many alterations. Our data provide insights into the epigenetic regulation of transcription and genome organization in medulloblastoma pathogenesis, which are probably also of importance in a wider developmental and disease context.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24847876
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