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  • GENES  (20)
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; DIAGNOSIS ; LUNG-CANCER ; HISTORY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; METABOLISM ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; DELETION ; MUTANT ; GLUTATHIONE ; AGE ; smoking ; cancer risk ; CARRIERS ; case-control studies ; TOBACCO ; CANCER-RESEARCH ; M1 ; glutathione-S-transferase ; GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE ; case-control study ; ENVIRONMENTAL CARCINOGENS ; GSTM1 ; GSTT1 ; METAANALYSIS ; CLASS-MU ; GSTT1 POLYMORPHISMS
    Abstract: The glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes are involved in the metabolism of various carcinogens. Deletion polymorphisms in the genes GSTM1 and GSTT1 and a base transition polymorphism at codon 105 (Ile--〉Val) in GSTP1 were investigated in relation to breast cancer risk. Tobacco smoking and reproductive factors were examined as potential effect modifiers. Individual data from seven case-control studies were pooled within the International Collaborative Study on Genetic Susceptibility to Environmental Carcinogens. To measure the effect of GSTs on breast cancer risk, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed adjusting for study center and age. The modifying effect was investigated by stratification on variables of smoking habits and reproductive history. A total of 2,048 cases with breast cancer and 1,969 controls were analyzed. The relative odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of breast cancer was 0.98 (0.86-1.12) with the GSTM1 null, 1.11 (0.87-1.41) with the GSTT1 null, 1.01 (0.79-1.28) with GSTP1 heterozygous mutants, and 0.93 (0.62-1.38) with GSTP1 homozygous mutants. Stratification by smoking or reproductive factors did not reveal a modifying effect of these variables, nor was there any association between GSTM1 and age at diagnosis of breast cancer. This is the largest study investigating susceptibility to breast cancer due to polymorphisms in the GST genes. The results conclusively show that single gene GST polymorphisms do not confer a substantial risk of breast cancer to its carriers. Furthermore, GSTs did not interact with smoking or reproductive history to modify cancer risk
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15342448
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; carcinoma ; CELL ; CELL LUNG-CANCER ; Germany ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; HEALTH ; PROMOTER ; case-control studies ; squamous cell carcinoma ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; EUROPE ; inflammation ; molecular epidemiology ; CYTOKINE ; CELL CARCINOMA ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; RE ; INTERLEUKIN-1 ; PROMOTER POLYMORPHISM ; CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 ; case control studies ; methods ; INTERLEUKIN-8 ; oral cancer ; CANCERS ; ESOPHAGEAL CANCER ; SQUAMOUS-CELL ; INTERLEUKIN-8 PROMOTER ; larynx cancer ; pharynx cancer ; upper aerodigestive tract cancers
    Abstract: Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of polymorphisms of genes involved in inflammation in the risk of cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT). Methods We have evaluated the role of polymorphisms in key genes related to inflammation, namely IL1B (rs1143627), COX2/PTGS2 (rs5275), and IL8 (rs4073) in a large case-control study comprising 811 UADT cancer cases and 1,083 controls. Results An association was observed for squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx for a polymorphism in the promoter of the IL1B gene, with an OR of 2.39 (95% CI = 1.19-4.81) for the homozygotes for the minor allele A promoter polymorphism of IL8 was associated with decreased risk of laryngeal cancer, with an OR of 0.70 (95% CI = 0.50-0.98) for carriers of the minor allele. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of these polymorphisms with respect to UADT carcinogenesis. Our results suggest that inflammation-related polymorphisms play a role, albeit minor, in the risk of developing cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17356794
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELL ; human ; LUNG ; MODEL ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; SUPPORT ; SYSTEM ; SYSTEMS ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; ENZYMES ; GENE ; GENES ; GENOME ; PATIENT ; DNA ; MARKER ; BIOLOGY ; cell cycle ; CELL-CYCLE ; CYCLE ; SEQUENCE ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; HEALTH ; DNA-REPAIR ; REPAIR ; COMPONENT ; MARKERS ; DAMAGE ; HUMAN GENOME ; REGION ; REGIONS ; DNA-DAMAGE ; CANCER-PATIENTS ; CANCER PATIENTS ; CYCLE CONTROL ; MULTICENTER ; DNA repair ; O-6-ALKYLGUANINE-DNA ALKYLTRANSFERASE ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; VARIANT ; CHECKPOINT ; biomarker ; INTERVAL ; ENZYME ; analysis ; DNA damage ; HAPLOTYPE ; USA ; odds ratio ; cancer research ; cell cycle checkpoints ; modeling ; cell cycle control ; block ; nonsmokers ; INTEGRITY
    Abstract: The DNA repair systems maintain the integrity of the human genome and cell cycle checkpoints are a critical component of the cellular response to DNA damage. We hypothesized that genetic variants in DNA repair and cell cycle control pathways will influence the predisposition to lung cancer, and studied 27 variants in 17 DNA repair enzymes and 10 variants in eight cell cycle control genes in 1,604 lung cancer patients and 2,053 controls. To improve the estimation of risks for specific variants, we applied a Bayesian approach in which we allowed the prior knowledge regarding the evolutionary biology and physicochemical properties of the variant to be incorporated into the hierarchical model. Based on the estimation from the hierarchical modeling, MGMT 143V or 178R, and CHEK2 157I had an odds ratio of lung cancer equal to 1.45 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.05-2.00], 1.18 (95% CI, 1.01-1.40), and 1.58 (95% CI, 1.14-2.17). The association of CHEK2 1571 seems to be overestimated in the conventional analysis. Nevertheless, this association seems to be robust in the hierarchical modeling. None of the pathways seem to have a prominent effect. In general, our study supports the notion that sequence variation may explain at least some of the variation of inherited susceptibility. In particular, further investigation of OGG1, MGMT, and CHEK2 focusing on the genetic regions where the present markers are located or the haplotype blocks tightly linked with these markers might be warranted
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18086781
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; IONIZING-RADIATION ; LUNG-CANCER ; EXPOSURE ; HISTORY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; radiation ; DNA ; FAMILY ; INDEX ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; FREQUENCY ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; FREQUENCIES ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; AGE ; family history ; WOMEN ; DNA-REPAIR ; REPAIR ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; BLADDER-CANCER ; cancer risk ; INSTABILITY ; PARAMETERS ; TRANSFORMATION ; genetic polymorphism ; case-control studies ; TOBACCO ; ALCOHOL ; BODY ; FLUORESCENCE ; DNA repair ; SKIN-CANCER ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; MASS INDEX ; MASSES ; BODIES ; case control study ; case-control study ; RE ; FAMILIES ; CAPACITY ; ALLELE ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; XPD ; individual susceptibility ; biomarker ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; analysis ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; FAMILY-HISTORY ; PREMENOPAUSAL ; odds ratio ; CANCER-RISK ; TOXICOLOGY ; microbiology ; CHINESE POPULATION ; - ; BODY-MASS ; BODY-MASS-INDEX ; biotechnology ; XRCC3 ; REPAIR GENE XRCC3
    Abstract: The X- ray repair cross- complementing group 3 gene ( XRCC3) belongs to a family of genes responsible for repairing DNA double- strand breaks caused by normal metabolic processes and exposure to ionizing radiation. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may alter an individual's capacity to repair damaged DNA and may lead to genetic instability and contribute to malignant transformation. We examined the role of a polymorphism in the XRCC3 gene ( rs861529; codon 241: threonine to methionine change) in determining breast cancer risk in Thai women. The study population consisted of 507 breast cancer cases and 425 healthy women. The polymorphism was analysed by fluorescence- based melting curve analysis. The XRCC3 241Met allele was found to be uncommon in the Thai population ( frequency 0.07 among cases and 0.05 among controls). Odds ratios ( OR) adjusted for age, body mass index, age at menarche, family history of breast cancer, menopausal status, reproduction parameters, use of contraceptives, tobacco smoking, involuntary tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, and education were calculated for the entire population as well as for pre- and postmenopausal women. There was a significant association between 241Met carrier status and breast cancer risk ( OR 1.58, 95% confidence interval ( CI) 1.02 - 2.44). Among postmenopausal women, a slightly higher OR ( 1.82, 95% CI 0.95 - 3.51) was found than among premenopausal women ( OR 1.48, 95% CI 0.82 - 2.69). Our findings suggest that the XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism is likely to play a modifying role in the individual susceptibility to breast cancer among Thai women as already shown for women of European ancestry
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17701750
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  • 5
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; CELL ; LUNG ; LUNG-CANCER ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; GENE ; GENES ; GENOME ; PROTEIN ; TISSUE ; MARKER ; TISSUES ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; ACID ; COUNTRIES ; REGION ; FRANCE ; EPITHELIAL-CELLS ; RECEPTORS ; SMOKERS ; DEPENDENCE ; SNPs ; NEURONS ; CANDIDATE ; ENGLAND ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; NUCLEOTIDE ; FAGERSTROM TOLERANCE QUESTIONNAIRE ; HAPLOTYPE MAP
    Abstract: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death worldwide, with over one million cases annually(1). To identify genetic factors that modify disease risk, we conducted a genome- wide association study by analysing 317,139 single- nucleotide polymorphisms in 1,989 lung cancer cases and 2,625 controls from six central European countries. We identified a locus in chromosome region 15q25 that was strongly associated with lung cancer ( P= 9 x 10(-10)). This locus was replicated in five separate lung cancer studies comprising an additional 2,513 lung cancer cases and 4,752 controls ( P = 5 x 10(-20) overall), and it was found to account for 14%( attributable risk) of lung cancer cases. Statistically similar risks were observed irrespective of smoking status or propensity to smoke tobacco. The association region contains several genes, including three that encode nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits ( CHRNA5, CHRNA3 and CHRNB4). Such subunits are expressed in neurons and other tissues, in particular alveolar epithelial cells, pulmonary neuroendocrine cells and lung cancer cell lines(2,3), and they bind to N'- nitrosonornicotine and potential lung carcinogens(4). A non- synonymous variant of CHRNA5 that induces an amino acid substitution ( D398N) at a highly conserved site in the second intracellular loop of the protein is among the markers with the strongest disease associations. Our results provide compelling evidence of a locus at 15q25 predisposing to lung cancer, and reinforce interest in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as potential disease candidates and chemopreventative targets(5)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18385738
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELL ; LUNG ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; validation ; DNA ; BIOMARKERS ; cell cycle ; CELL-CYCLE ; SEQUENCE ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; SUSCEPTIBILITY LOCUS ; VARIANTS ; HEALTH ; NUMBER ; REPAIR ; smoking ; p53 ; cancer risk ; FRANCE ; genotyping ; DNA repair ; TP53 ; ONCOLOGY ; VARIANT ; METAANALYSIS ; XRCC1 ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; biomarker ; analysis ; methods ; DNA repair genes ; pooled analysis ; USA ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; OGG1 ; NOV ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; association study ; XRCC3 ; discussion ; POOLED-ANALYSIS ; CONSORTIUM ; genetic variants ; GENOME-WIDE ; APEX1
    Abstract: Background: The International Lung Cancer Consortium was established in 2004. To clarify the role of DNA repair genes in lung cancer susceptibility, we conducted a pooled analysis of genetic variants in DNA repair pathways, whose associations have been investigated by at least 3 individual studies. Methods: Data from 14 studies were pooled for 18 sequence variants in 12 DNA repair genes, including APEX1, OGG1, XRCC1, XRCC2, XRCC3, ERCC1, XPD, XPF, XPG, XPA, MGMT, and TP53. The total number of subjects included in the analysis for each variant ranged from 2,073 to 13,955 subjects. Results: Four of the variants were found to be weakly associated with lung cancer risk with borderline significance: these were XRCC3 T241M [heterozygote odds ratio (OR), 0.89; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.79-0.99 and homozygote OR, 0.84; 95% Cl, 0.71-1.00] based on 3,467 cases and 5,021 controls from 8 studies, XPD K751Q (heterozygote OR, 0.99; 95% Cl, 0.89-1.10 and homozygote OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.02-1.39) based on 6,463 cases and 6,603 controls from 9 studies, and TP53 R72P (heterozygote OR, 1.14; 95% Cl, 1.00-1.29 and homozygote OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.02-1.42) based on 3,610 cases and 5,293 controls from 6 studies. OGG1 S326C homozygote was suggested to be associated with lung cancer risk in Caucasians (homozygote OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.01-1.79) based on 2,569 cases and 4,178 controls from 4 studies but not in Asians. The other 14 variants did not exhibit main effects on lung cancer risk. Discussion: In addition to data pooling, future priorities of International Lung Cancer Consortium include coordinated genotyping and multistage validation for ongoing genome-wide association studies. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008;17(11):3081-9)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18990748
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  • 7
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; carcinoma ; CELL ; LUNG ; MODEL ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; METABOLISM ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; AGE ; DNA-REPAIR ; smoking ; ADHESION ; CELL-ADHESION ; inflammation ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; VARIANT ; CANDIDATE GENES ; METHYLENETETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE ; INCREASED RISK ; SQUAMOUS-CELL ; CHINESE POPULATION ; XUAN-WEI ; METHYLENE-TETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE ; GENE POLYMORPHISMS ; Genetic ; CENTRAL-EUROPE ; SEQUENCE VARIANTS
    Abstract: Background. Analysis of candidate genes in individual studies has had only limited success in identifying particular gene variants that are conclusively associated with lung cancer risk. In the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO), we conducted a coordinated genotyping study of 10 common variants selected because of their prior evidence of an association with lung cancer. These variants belonged to candidate genes from different cancer-related pathways including inflammation (IL1B), folate metabolism (MTHFR), regulatory function (AKAP9 and CAMKK1), cell adhesion (SEZL6) and apoptosis (FAS, FASL, TP53, TP53BP1 and BAT3). Methods. Genotype data from 15 ILCCO case-control studies were available for a total of 8431 lung cancer cases and 11 072 controls of European descent and Asian ethnic groups. Unconditional logistic regression was used to model the association between each variant and lung cancer risk. Results. Only the association between a non-synonymous variant of TP53BP1 (rs560191) and lung cancer risk was significant (OR = 0.91, P = 0.002). This association was more striking for squamous cell carcinoma (OR = 0.86, P = 6 x 10(-4)). No heterogeneity by center, ethnicity, smoking status, age group or sex was observed. In order to confirm this association, we included results for this variant from a set of independent studies (9966 cases/11 722 controls) and we reported similar results. When combining all these studies together, we reported an overall OR = 0.93 (0.89-0.97) (P = 0.001). This association was significant only for squamous cell carcinoma [OR = 0.89 (0.85-0.95), P = 1 x 10(-4)]. Conclusion. This study suggests that rs560191 is associated to lung cancer risk and further highlights the value of consortia in replicating or refuting published genetic associations
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20106900
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; PATHWAY ; INFORMATION ; DISEASE ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; MARKER ; IMPACT ; SEQUENCE ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; FORM ; STAGE ; HEALTH ; DESIGN ; NUMBER ; smoking ; BLADDER ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; MARKERS ; FRANCE ; PRODUCT ; Jun ; case-control studies ; TOBACCO ; CANCER-RESEARCH ; TOBACCO SMOKING ; SINGLE ; ONCOLOGY ; case control study ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; CANDIDATE GENES ; CATECHOL-O-METHYLTRANSFERASE ; EMPIRICAL-BAYES ; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES ; interaction ; ISSUES ; MATRICES ; MYELOPEROXIDASE ; SUPEROXIDE-DISMUTASE ; XRCC1 POLYMORPHISMS
    Abstract: Background: Genetic association studies are generating much information, usually in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes. Analyzing such data is challenging, and raises issues of multiple comparisons and potential false-positive associations. Using data from a case-control study of bladder cancer, we showed how to use hierarchical modeling in genetic epidemiologic studies with multiple markers to control overestimation of effects and potential false-positive associations. Methods: The data were first analyzed with the conventional approach of estimating each main effect individually. We subsequently employed hierarchical modeling by adding a second stage (prior) model that incorporated information on the potential function of the genes. We used an empirical-Bayes approach, estimating the residual effects of the genes from the data. When the residual effect was set to zero, we instead used a semi-Bayes approach, in which they were pre-specified. We also explored the impact of using different second-stage design matrices. Finally, we used two approaches for assessing gene-environment interactions. The first approach added product terms into the first-stage model. The second approach used three indicators for subjects exposed to gene-only, environment-only, and both genetic and environmental factors. Results: By pre-specifying the prior second-stage covariates, the estimates were shrunk to the mean of each pathway. The conventional model detected a number of positive associations, which were reduced with the hierarchical model. For example, the odds ratio for myeloperoxidase (G/G, G/A) genotype changed from 3.17 [95% confidence interval (0), 1.32-7.59] to 1.64 (95% CI, 0.81-3.34). A similar phenomenon was observed for the gene-environment interactions. The odds ratio for the gene-environment interaction between tobacco smoking and N-acetyltransferase 1 fast genotype was 2.74 (95% Cl, 0.68-11.0) from the conventional analysis and 1.24 (95% CI, 0.80-1.93) from the hierarchical model. Conclusion: Adding a second-stage hierarchical modeling can reduce the likelihood of false positive via shrinkage toward the prior mean, improve the risk estimation by increasing the precision, and, therefore, represents an alternative to conventional methods for genetic association studies
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15184258
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; COMMON ; DISEASE ; RISK ; RISKS ; GENE ; GENES ; primary ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; STAGE ; PATTERNS ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; SNP ; DATABASE ; Jun ; POPULATIONS ; familial risk ; BRCA2 MUTATIONS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY GENE ; SINGLE ; AGGREGATION ; VARIANT ; ALLELE ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SNPs ; CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; ALLELES ; LEVEL ; familial aggregation ; single-nucleotide ; UNIT ; ENGLAND ; LOCI ; CHEK2-ASTERISK-1100DELC ; breast cancer susceptibility ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; association study ; GENETIC-SUSCEPTIBILITY ; GROWTH-FACTOR RECEPTOR-2
    Abstract: Breast cancer exhibits familial aggregation, consistent with variation in genetic susceptibility to the disease. Known susceptibility genes account for less than 25% of the familial risk of breast cancer, and the residual genetic variance is likely to be due to variants conferring more moderate risks. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study in 4,398 breast cancer cases and 4,316 controls, followed by a third stage in which 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for confirmation in 21,860 cases and 22,578 controls from 22 studies. We used 227,876 SNPs that were estimated to correlate with 77% of known common SNPs in Europeans at r(2) 〉 0.5. SNPs in five novel independent loci exhibited strong and consistent evidence of association with breast cancer (P 〈 10(-7)). Four of these contain plausible causative genes (FGFR2, TNRC9, MAP3K1 and LSP1). At the second stage, 1,792 SNPs were significant at the P 〈 0.05 level compared with an estimated 1,343 that would be expected by chance, indicating that many additional common susceptibility alleles may be identifiable by this approach
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17529967
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG ; PHASE-I ; DIAGNOSIS ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; RISK ; ENZYMES ; GENE ; GENES ; microarray ; METABOLISM ; PATIENT ; CARCINOGENESIS ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; ACID ; ACIDS ; AGE ; SNP ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; Jun ; PHENOTYPE ; CARRIERS ; SERIES ; EUROPE ; molecular epidemiology ; PHASE-II ; VASCULAR-DISEASE ; YOUNG ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; EXTENSION ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SNPs ; development ; METHYLENETETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE ; MTHFR ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; ENZYME ; PHASE ; GENOTYPE ; HAPLOTYPE ; single-nucleotide ; single-nucleotide polymorphism ; technique ; oligonucleotide microarray ; PRIMER EXTENSION ; INCREASED RISK ; Phase I ; COMMON MUTATION
    Abstract: The role of genes coding for xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) and the risk of lung cancer is unclear. Under the assumption that these genes may be more important among people having a diagnosis of lung cancer at younger ages, we have investigated the role of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within phase I and phase II XME genes, and also genes involved in the metabolism of nucleic acids in a series of young onset patients and matched controls. We genotyped 299 lung cancer cases diagnosed before the age of 50 and 317 controls, from six countries of Central and Eastern Europe, by use of an oligonucleotide microarray and arrayed primer extension technique for 45 SNPs in 15 phase I XME genes, 46 SNPs in 17 phase H genes and 9 SNPs in 4 genes related to metabolism of nucleic acids. Heterozygote carriers of SNPs in CYP1A2 1545T〉C, -164C〉A and -740T〉G; CYP2A6 -47A〉C; MDR1 3435T〉C; NAT1 1088T〉A and 1095A〉C; GSTA2 S112T, GSTM3 V224I and MTHFR A222V had altered risk of developing lung cancer. Phenotypes reconstructed after haplotype analyses showed that the carriers of the combined NAT] fast+ NAT2 fast phenotypes were at lower risk when compared with those with the combined NAT1 slow + NAT2 slow acetylator phenotypes. Finally, extensive EPHX1 metabolizers showed an increased risk as compared with the poor metabolizers
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17259654
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