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  • GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION  (12)
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  • 1
    Keywords: LOCI ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; MISSING HERITABILITY
    Abstract: Objectives: We aimed at extending the Natural and Orthogonal Interaction (NOIA) framework, developed for modeling gene-gene interactions in the analysis of quantitative traits, to allow for reduced genetic models, dichotomous traits, and gene-environment interactions. We evaluate the performance of the NOIA statistical models using simulated data and lung cancer data. Methods: The NOIA statistical models are developed for additive, dominant, and recessive genetic models as well as for a binary environmental exposure. Using the Kronecker product rule, a NOIA statistical model is built to model gene-environment interactions. By treating the genotypic values as the logarithm of odds, the NOIA statistical models are extended to the analysis of case-control data. Results: Our simulations showed that power for testing associations while allowing for interaction using the NOIA statistical model is much higher than using functional models for most of the scenarios we simulated. When applied to lung cancer data, much smaller p values were obtained using the NOIA statistical model for either the main effects or the SNP-smoking interactions for some of the SNPs tested. Conclusion: The NOIA statistical models are usually more powerful than the functional models in detecting main effects and interaction effects for both quantitative traits and binary traits.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22889990
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  • 2
    Keywords: RISK ; MEN ; GLIOMA ; JAPANESE ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; COMMON VARIANTS ; MYOSIN VI ; 22Q13
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of 〉10 million SNPs in 43,303 prostate cancer cases and 43,737 controls from studies in populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. Twenty-three new susceptibility loci were identified at association P 〈 5 x 10(-8); 15 variants were identified among men of European ancestry, 7 were identified in multi-ancestry analyses and 1 was associated with early-onset prostate cancer. These 23 variants, in combination with known prostate cancer risk variants, explain 33% of the familial risk for this disease in European-ancestry populations. These findings provide new regions for investigation into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and demonstrate the usefulness of combining ancestrally diverse populations to discover risk loci for disease.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25217961
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  • 3
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; EXPRESSION ; tumor ; THERAPY ; RISK ; BREAST ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
    Abstract: Background The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway has been implicated in prostate cancer (PCa) initiation, but its role in progression remains unknown. Methods Among 5887 PCa patients (704 PCa deaths) of European ancestry from seven cohorts in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium, we conducted Cox kernel machine pathway analysis to evaluate whether 530 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 IGF pathway-related genes were collectively associated with PCa mortality. We also conducted SNP-specific analysis using stratified Cox models adjusting for multiple testing. In 2424 patients (313 PCa deaths), we evaluated the association of prediagnostic circulating IGF1 and IGFBP3 levels and PCa mortality. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The IGF signaling pathway was associated with PCa mortality (P = .03), and IGF2-AS and SSTR2 were the main contributors (both P = .04). In SNP-specific analysis, 36 SNPs were associated with PCa mortality with P-trend less than .05, but only three SNPs in the IGF2-AS remained statistically significant after gene-based corrections. Two were in linkage disequilibrium (r(2) = 1 for rs1004446 and rs3741211), whereas the third, rs4366464, was independent (r(2) = 0.03). The hazard ratios (HRs) per each additional risk allele were 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06 to 1.34; P-trend = .003) for rs3741211 and 1.44 (95% CI = 1.20 to 1.73; P-trend 〈 .001) for rs4366464. rs4366464 remained statistically significant after correction for all SNPs (P-trend.corr =.04). Prediagnostic IGF1 (HRhighest vs lowest quartile = 0.71; 95% CI = 0.48 to 1.04) and IGFBP3 (HR = 0.93; 95% CI = 0.65 to 1.34) levels were not associated with PCa mortality. Conclusions The IGF signaling pathway, primarily IGF2-AS and SSTR2 genes, may be important in PCa survival.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 4
    Keywords: COLON-CANCER ; microsatellite instability ; POPULATION-BASED SAMPLE ; ULCERATIVE-COLITIS ; CROHNS-DISEASE ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; ISLAND METHYLATOR PHENOTYPE ; MOLECULAR-FEATURES ; MAIT CELLS
    Abstract: We identified the minor allele (T) in SNP rs11676348 to have pleiotropic effect on risk of UC and CRC, particularly in tumors with an inflammatory component. Our findings offer the promise of risk stratification of UC patients for developing CRC.Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have separately identified many genetic susceptibility loci for ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn's disease (CD) and colorectal cancer (CRC), there has been no large-scale examination for pleiotropy, or shared genetic susceptibility, for these conditions. We used logistic regression modeling to examine the associations of 181 UC and CD susceptibility variants previously identified by GWAS with risk of CRC using data from the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. We also examined associations of significant variants with clinical and molecular characteristics in a subset of the studies. Among 11794 CRC cases and 14190 controls, rs11676348, the susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) for UC, was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC (P = 7E-05). The multivariate-adjusted odds ratio of CRC with each copy of the T allele was 0.93 (95% CI 0.89-0.96). The association of the SNP with risk of CRC differed according to mucinous histological features (P (heterogeneity) = 0.008). In addition, the (T) allele was associated with lower risk of tumors with Crohn's-like reaction but not tumors without such immune infiltrate (P (heterogeneity) = 0.02) and microsatellite instability-high (MSI-high) but not microsatellite stable or MSI-low tumors (P (heterogeneity) = 0.03). The minor allele (T) in SNP rs11676348, located downstream from CXCR2 that has been implicated in CRC progression, is associated with a lower risk of CRC, particularly tumors with a mucinous component, Crohn's-like reaction and MSI-high. Our findings offer the promise of risk stratification of inflammatory bowel disease patients for complications such as CRC.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26071399
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  • 5
    Keywords: COHORT ; HETEROCYCLIC AMINES ; POLYMORPHISMS ; smoking ; COLON-CANCER ; CONSUMPTION ; EXCISION-REPAIR ; GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; POULTRY INTAKE
    Abstract: Background: Red meat intake has been associated with risk of colorectal cancer, potentially mediated through heterocyclic amines. The metabolic efficiency of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) required for the metabolic activation of such amines is influenced by genetic variation. The interaction between red meat intake, NAT2 genotype, and colorectal cancer has been inconsistently reported. Methods: We used pooled individual-level data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium. Red meat intake was collected by each study. We inferred NAT2 phenotype based on polymorphism at rs1495741, highly predictive of enzyme activity. Interaction was assessed using multiplicative interaction terms in multivariate-adjusted models. Results: From 11 studies, 8,290 colorectal cancer cases and 9,115 controls were included. The highest quartile of red meat intake was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer compared with the lowest quartile [ OR, 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.29-1.55]. However, a significant association was observed only for studies with retrospective diet data, not for studies with diet prospectively assessed before cancer diagnosis. Combining all studies, high red meat intake was similarly associated with colorectal cancer in those with a rapid/intermediate NAT2 genotype (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.20-1.59) as with a slow genotype (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.28-1.61; P interaction = 0.9). Conclusion: We found that high red meat intake was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer only from retrospective case-control studies and not modified by NAT2 enzyme activity. Impact: Our results suggest no interaction between NAT2 genotype and red meat intake in mediating risk of colorectal cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25342387
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  • 6
    Keywords: GENES ; METAANALYSIS ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; 8Q24 ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; SEQUENCE VARIANTS ; MULTIPLE ; PSA LEVELS
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with prostate cancer risk. However, whether these associations can be consistently replicated, vary with disease aggressiveness (tumor stage and grade) and/or interact with non-genetic potential risk factors or other SNPs is unknown. We therefore genotyped 39 SNPs from regions identified by several prostate cancer GWAS in 10,501 prostate cancer cases and 10,831 controls from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We replicated 36 out of 39 SNPs (P-values ranging from 0.01 to 10(-28)). Two SNPs located near KLK3 associated with PSA levels showed differential association with Gleason grade (rs2735839, P = 0.0001 and rs266849, P = 0.0004; case-only test), where the alleles associated with decreasing PSA levels were inversely associated with low-grade (as defined by Gleason grade,8) tumors but positively associated with high-grade tumors. No other SNP showed differential associations according to disease stage or grade. We observed no effect modification by SNP for association with age at diagnosis, family history of prostate cancer, diabetes, BMI, height, smoking or alcohol intake. Moreover, we found no evidence of pair-wise SNP-SNP interactions. While these SNPs represent new independent risk factors for prostate cancer, we saw little evidence for effect modification by other SNPs or by the environmental factors examined
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21390317
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  • 7
    Keywords: POPULATION ; RISK ; GENES ; ASSOCIATION ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; AGE ; MEN ; PREDICTORS ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; cancer research ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) of prostate cancer in a Japanese population identified five novel regions not previously discovered in other ethnicities. In this study, we attempt to replicate these five loci in a series of nested prostate cancer case-control studies of European ancestry. METHODS: We genotyped five single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP): rs13385191 (chromosome 2p24), rs12653946 (5p15), rs1983891 (6p21), rs339331 (6p22), and rs9600079 (13q22), in 7,956 prostate cancer cases and 8,148 controls from a series of nested case-control studies within the National cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We tested each SNP for association with prostate cancer risk and assessed whether associations differed with respect to disease severity and age of onset. RESULTS: Four SNPs (rs13385191, rs12653946, rs1983891, and rs339331) were significantly associated with prostate cancer risk (P values ranging from 0.01 to 1.1 x 10(-5)). Allele frequencies and ORs were overall lower in our population of European descent than in the discovery Asian population. SNP rs13385191 (C2orf43) was only associated with low-stage disease (P = 0.009, case-only test). No other SNP showed association with disease severity or age of onset. We did not replicate the 13q22 SNP, rs9600079 (P = 0.62). CONCLUSIONS: Four SNPs associated with prostate cancer risk in an Asian population are also associated with prostate cancer risk in men of European descent. IMPACT: This study illustrates the importance of evaluation of prostate cancer risk markers across ethnic groups.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22056501
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; COHORT ; RISK ; GENE ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; HEALTH ; COLON-CANCER ; ALCOHOL ; CONSUMPTION ; FRUIT ; LIFE-STYLE ; MASS INDEX ; CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; METAANALYSIS ; VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION ; LOCI ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; sex ; SCAN ; RISK LOCI ; CHROMOSOME 8Q24
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than a dozen loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Here, we examined potential effect-modification between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at 10 of these loci and probable or established environmental risk factors for CRC in 7,016 CRC cases and 9,723 controls from nine cohort and case-control studies. We used meta-analysis of an efficient empirical-Bayes estimator to detect potential multiplicative interactions between each of the SNPs [rs16892766 at8q23.3 (EIF3H/UTP23), rs6983267 at 8q24 (MYC), rs10795668 at 10p14 (FLJ3802842), rs3802842 at 11q23 (LOC120376), rs4444235 at 14q22.2 (BMP4), rs4779584 at 15q13 (GREM1), rs9929218 at 16q22.1 (CDH1), rs4939827 at 18q21 (SMAD7), rs10411210 at 19q13.1 (RHPN2), and rs961253 at 20p12.3 (BMP2)] and select major CRC risk factors (sex, body mass index, height, smoking status, aspirin/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, alcohol use, and dietary intake of calcium, folate, red meat, processed meat, vegetables, fruit, and fiber). The strongest statistical evidence for a gene-environment interaction across studies was for vegetable consumption and rs16892766, located on chromosome 8q23.3, near the EIF3H and UTP23 genes (nominal P-interaction = 1.3 x 10(-4); adjusted P = 0.02). The magnitude of the main effect of the SNP increased with increasing levels of vegetable consumption. No other interactions were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Overall, the association of most CRC susceptibility loci identified in initial GWAS seems to be invariant to the other risk factors considered; however, our results suggest potential modification of the rs16892766 effect by vegetable consumption.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22367214
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  • 9
    Keywords: BREAST-CANCER ; FACTOR-BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; SERUM-LEVELS ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; MENDELIAN RANDOMIZATION ; MISSING HERITABILITY
    Abstract: The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathway has been implicated in prostate development and carcinogenesis. We conducted a comprehensive analysis, utilizing a resequencing and tagging single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) approach, between common genetic variation in the IGF1, IGF binding protein (BP) 1, and IGFBP3 genes with IGF-I and IGFBP-3 blood levels, and prostate cancer (PCa) risk, among Caucasians in the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium. We genotyped 14 IGF1 SNPs and 16 IGFBP1/IGFBP3 SNPs to capture common [minor allele frequency (MAF) 〉or= 5%] variation among Caucasians. For each SNP, we assessed the geometric mean difference in IGF blood levels (N = 5684) across genotypes and the association with PCa risk (6012 PCa cases/6641 controls). We present two-sided statistical tests and correct for multiple comparisons. A non-synonymous IGFBP3 SNP in exon 1, rs2854746 (Gly32Ala), was associated with IGFBP-3 blood levels (P(adj) = 8.8 x 10(-43)) after adjusting for the previously established IGFBP3 promoter polymorphism A-202C (rs2854744); IGFBP-3 blood levels were 6.3% higher for each minor allele. For IGF1 SNP rs4764695, the risk estimates among heterozygotes was 1.01 (99% CI: 0.90-1.14) and 1.20 (99% CI: 1.06-1.37) for variant homozygotes with overall PCa risk. The corrected allelic P-value was 8.7 x 10(-3). IGF-I levels were significantly associated with PCa risk (P(trend) = 0.02) with a 21% increase of PCa risk when compared with the highest quartile to the lowest quartile. We have identified SNPs significantly associated with IGFBP-3 blood levels, but none of these alter PCa risk; however, a novel IGF1 SNP, not associated with IGF-I blood levels, shows preliminary evidence for association with PCa risk among Caucasians.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20484221
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  • 10
    Keywords: BREAST-CANCER ; DESIGN ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; COLON-CANCER ; METAANALYSIS ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; MULTIPLE LOCI ; CHROMOSOME 8Q24 ; IDENTIFIES 5
    Abstract: Objective Genome-wide association studies have identified a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with a wide array of cancer sites. Several of these variants demonstrate associations with multiple cancers, suggesting pleiotropic effects and shared biological mechanisms across some cancers. We hypothesised that SNPs previously associated with other cancers may additionally be associated with colorectal cancer. In a large-scale study, we examined 171 SNPs previously associated with 18 different cancers for their associations with colorectal cancer. Design We examined 13 338 colorectal cancer cases and 40 967 controls from three consortia: Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE), Genetic Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer (GECCO), and the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR). Study-specific logistic regression results, adjusted for age, sex, principal components of genetic ancestry, and/or study specific factors (as relevant) were combined using fixed-effect meta-analyses to evaluate the association between each SNP and colorectal cancer risk. A Bonferroni-corrected p value of 2.92x10(-4) was used to determine statistical significance of the associations. Results Two correlated SNPs-rs10090154 and rs4242382-in Region 1 of chromosome 8q24, a prostate cancer susceptibility region, demonstrated statistically significant associations with colorectal cancer risk. The most significant association was observed with rs4242382 (meta-analysis OR=1.12; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.18; p = 1.74x10(-5)), which also demonstrated similar associations across racial/ethnic populations and anatomical sub-sites. Conclusions This is the first study to clearly demonstrate Region 1 of chromosome 8q24 as a susceptibility locus for colorectal cancer; thus, adding colorectal cancer to the list of cancer sites linked to this particular multicancer risk region at 8q24.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23935004
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