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  • GROWTH-FACTOR-I  (6)
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; cohort study ; RISK ; PROTEIN ; DIFFERENTIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; AGE ; nutrition ; pancreatic cancer ; CELL-GROWTH ; FACTOR-ALPHA ; IGF-I ; EPIC PROJECT ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; SERUM-LEVELS ; C-PEPTIDE ; IGFBP-3 ; MALE SMOKERS ; FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; prospective cohorts
    Abstract: Background:Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (BPs) regulate cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, and may have a role in the aetiology of various cancers. Information on their role in pancreatic cancer is limited and was examined here in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.Methods:Serum concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 422 cases and 422 controls matched on age, sex, study centre, recruitment date, and time since last meal. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for confounding variables.Results:Neither circulating levels of IGF-I (OR=1.21, 95% CI 0.75-1.93 for top vs bottom quartile, P-trend 0.301), IGFBP-3 (OR=1.00, 95% CI 0.66-1.51, P-trend 0.79), nor the molar IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio, an indicator of free IGF-I level (OR=1.22, 95% CI 0.75-1.97, P-trend 0.27), were statistically significantly associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer. In a cross-classification, however, a high concentration of IGF-I with concurrently low levels of IGFBP-3 was related to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR=1.72, 95% CI 1.05-2.83; P-interaction=0.154).Conclusion:On the basis of these results, circulating levels of components of the IGF axis do not appear to be the risk factors for pancreatic cancer. However, on the basis of the results of a subanalysis, it cannot be excluded that a relatively large amount of IGF-1 together with very low levels of IGFBP-3 might still be associated with an increase in pancreatic cancer risk.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22315049
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  • 2
    Keywords: OBESITY ; PATHOGENESIS ; nutrition ; ADIPOSE-TISSUE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; PREMENOPAUSAL ; C-PEPTIDE ; Adiponectin
    Abstract: A "Western" lifestyle characterized by physical inactivity and excess weight is associated with a number of metabolic and hormonal dysregulations, including increased circulating estrogen levels, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and chronic inflammation. The same hormonal and metabolic axes might mediate the association between this lifestyle and the development of endometrial cancer. Using data collected within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a prospective cohort study carried out in 10 European countries during 1992-2000, we conducted a factor analysis to delineate important components that summarize the variation explained by a set of biomarkers and to examine their association with endometrial cancer risk. Prediagnostic levels of testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, sex hormone-binding globulin, estrone, estradiol, C-peptide, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins 1 and 2, adiponectin, high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glucose, triglycerides, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, soluble TNF receptors 1 and 2, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist were measured in 233 incident endometrial cancer cases and 446 matched controls. Factor analysis identified 3 components associated with postmenopausal endometrial cancer risk that could be labeled "insulin resistance/metabolic syndrome," "steroids," and "inflammation" factors. A fourth component, "lipids," was not significantly associated with endometrial cancer. In conclusion, besides the well-known associations of risk with sex hormones and insulin-regulated physiological axes, our data further support the hypothesis that inflammation factors play a role in endometrial carcinogenesis.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23492765
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; DISEASE ; PROTEINS ; NESTED CASE-CONTROL ; insulin ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; ENERGY-BALANCE ; ANDROGEN ; SERUM TESTOSTERONE ; LIVER-CIRRHOSIS
    Abstract: Elevated prediagnostic testosterone and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) concentrations have been proposed to increase risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the metabolism of these hormones is altered as a consequence of liver damage and they may have clinical utility as HCC risk markers. A case-control study was nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort and included 125 incident HCC cases and 247 individually matched controls. Testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and IGF-I were analyzed by immunoassays. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by conditional logistic regression. The area under the receiver operating curves (AUC) was calculated to assess HCC predictive ability of the tested models. After adjustments for epidemiological variables (body mass index, smoking, ethanol intake, hepatitis and diabetes) and liver damage (a score based on albumin, bilirubin, aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine aminotransaminase, gamma-glutamyltransferase and alkaline phosphatase concentrations), only SHBG remained significantly associated with risk [OR for top versus bottom tertile of 3.86 (1.32-11.3), p(trend) = 0.009]. As a single factor SHBG had an AUC of 0.81 (0.75-0.86). A small, but significant increase in AUC was observed when SHBG was added to a model including the liver damage score and epidemiological variables (from 0.89 to 0.91, p = 0.02) and a net reclassification of 0.47% (0.45-0.48). The observed associations of HCC with prediagnostic SHBG, free testosterone and IGF-I concentrations are in directions opposite to that expected under the etiological hypotheses. SHBG has a potential to be tested as prediagnostic risk marker for HCC.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23801371
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  • 4
    Keywords: COHORT ; PRIMARY LIVER-CANCER ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; DIET ; IGF-I ; EPIC PROJECT ; METAANALYSIS ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; HEPATITIS-B ; IGFBP-3
    Abstract: Intake of dairy products has been associated with risk of some cancers, but findings are often inconsistent and information on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is limited, particularly from prospective settings. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between consumption of total and specific dairy products (milk/cheese/yogurt) and their components (calcium/vitamin D/fats/protein), with first incident HCC (N(cases) = 191) in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, including a nested case-control subset (N(cases) = 122) with the assessment of hepatitis B virus/hepatitis C virus infections status, liver damage and circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I levels. For cohort analyses, multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). For nested case-control analyses, conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% CI. A total of 477,206 participants were followed-up for an average of 11 years (person-years follow-up = 5,415,385). In the cohort study, a significant positive HCC risk association was observed for total dairy products (highest vs. lowest tertile, HR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.13-2.43; p(trend) = 0.012), milk (HR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.02-2.24; p(trend) = 0.049), and cheese (HR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.02-2.38; p(trend) = 0.101), but not yogurt (HR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.65-1.35). Dietary calcium, vitamin D, fat and protein from dairy sources were associated with increased HCC risk, whereas the same nutrients from nondairy sources showed inverse or null associations. In the nested case-control study, similar results were observed among hepatitis-free individuals. Results from this large prospective cohort study suggest that higher consumption of dairy products, particularly milk and cheese, may be associated with increased HCC risk. Validation of these findings in other populations is necessary. Potential biologic mechanisms require further exploration.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24615266
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  • 5
    Keywords: MORTALITY ; RISK ; III COLON-CANCER ; insulin ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; CONTROLLED-TRIAL ; VITAMIN-D ; MILK INTAKE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: We investigated whether prediagnostic reported intake of dairy products and dietary calcium is associated with colorectal cancer survival. METHODS: Data from 3,859 subjects with colorectal cancer (42.1% male; mean age at diagnosis, 64.2 +/- 8.1 years) in the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort were analyzed. Intake of dairy products and dietary calcium was assessed at baseline (1992-2000) using validated, country-specific dietary questionnaires. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to calculate HR and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) for colorectal cancer-specific death (n = 1,028) and all-cause death (n = 1,525) for different quartiles of intake. RESULTS: The consumption of total dairy products was not statistically significantly associated with risk of colorectal cancer-specific death (adjusted HR Q4 vs. Q1, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.97-1.43) nor that of all-cause death (Q4 vs. Q1, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.98-1.36). Multivariable-adjusted HRs for colorectal cancer-specific death (Q4 vs. Q1) were 1.21 (95% CI, 0.99-1.48) for milk, 1.09 (95% CI, 0.88-1.34) for yoghurt, and 0.93 (95% CI, 0.76-1.14) for cheese. The intake of dietary calcium was not associated with the risk of colorectal cancer-specific death (adjusted HR Q4 vs. Q1, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.81-1.26) nor that of all-cause death (Q4 vs. Q1, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.84-1.21). CONCLUSIONS: The prediagnostic reported intake of dairy products and dietary calcium is not associated with disease-specific or all-cause risk of death in patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. IMPACT: The impact of diet on cancer survival is largely unknown. This study shows that despite its inverse association with colorectal cancer risk, the prediagnostic intake of dairy and dietary calcium does not affect colorectal cancer survival.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24917183
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  • 6
    Keywords: CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; INSULIN SENSITIVITY ; INFLAMMATORY MARKERS ; HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS ; ESTRADIOL LEVELS ; SYSTEMIC MARKERS
    Abstract: PURPOSE: Alcohol intake may adversely affect the concentrations of endogenous sex hormones, and thus increase the risk of endometrial cancer. However, epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting results. Therefore, we investigated the association between alcohol intake and endometrial cancer risk a large, multicenter, prospective study. METHODS: From 1992 through 2010, 301,051 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort were followed for incident endometrial cancer (n = 1382). Baseline alcohol consumption was assessed by country-specific, validated dietary questionnaires. Information on past alcohol consumption was collected by lifestyle questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: The multivariable HRs (and 95% CIs) compared with light drinkers (0.1-6 g/d) were 1.03 (0.88-1.20) for 0 g of alcohol per day at baseline, 1.01 (0.86-1.17) for 6.1-12 g/d, 1.03 (0.87-1.22) for 12.1-24 g/d, 1.07 (0.87-1.38) for 24.1-36 g/d, and 0.85 (0.61-1.18) for more than 36 g/d (p(trend) = 0.77). No association was observed among former drinkers (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.98-1.68 compared with light drinkers). Null associations were also found between alcohol consumption at age 20 years, lifetime pattern of alcohol drinking, and baseline alcohol intake from specific alcoholic beverages and endometrial cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest no association between alcohol intake and endometrial cancer risk.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23273691
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