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  • Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy  (243)
  • Animals  (201)
  • General Chemistry  (65)
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-06-16
    Description: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of conditions characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and restricted and repetitive behaviours. ASD is a highly heritable disorder involving various genetic determinants. Shank2 (also known as ProSAP1) is a multi-domain scaffolding protein and signalling adaptor enriched at excitatory neuronal synapses, and mutations in the human SHANK2 gene have recently been associated with ASD and intellectual disability. Although ASD-associated genes are being increasingly identified and studied using various approaches, including mouse genetics, further efforts are required to delineate important causal mechanisms with the potential for therapeutic application. Here we show that Shank2-mutant (Shank2(-/-)) mice carrying a mutation identical to the ASD-associated microdeletion in the human SHANK2 gene exhibit ASD-like behaviours including reduced social interaction, reduced social communication by ultrasonic vocalizations, and repetitive jumping. These mice show a marked decrease in NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) glutamate receptor (NMDAR) function. Direct stimulation of NMDARs with D-cycloserine, a partial agonist of NMDARs, normalizes NMDAR function and improves social interaction in Shank2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, treatment of Shank2(-/-) mice with a positive allosteric modulator of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), which enhances NMDAR function via mGluR5 activation, also normalizes NMDAR function and markedly enhances social interaction. These results suggest that reduced NMDAR function may contribute to the development of ASD-like phenotypes in Shank2(-/-) mice, and mGluR modulation of NMDARs offers a potential strategy to treat ASD.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Won, Hyejung -- Lee, Hye-Ryeon -- Gee, Heon Yung -- Mah, Won -- Kim, Jae-Ick -- Lee, Jiseok -- Ha, Seungmin -- Chung, Changuk -- Jung, Eun Suk -- Cho, Yi Sul -- Park, Sae-Geun -- Lee, Jung-Soo -- Lee, Kyungmin -- Kim, Daesoo -- Bae, Yong Chul -- Kaang, Bong-Kiun -- Lee, Min Goo -- Kim, Eunjoon -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jun 13;486(7402):261-5. doi: 10.1038/nature11208.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biological Sciences, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701, Korea.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22699620" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/*genetics ; Animals ; Antimetabolites/pharmacology ; *Autistic Disorder/genetics/metabolism ; Behavior, Animal/*drug effects/physiology ; Benzamides/*pharmacology ; Cycloserine/*pharmacology ; Disease Models, Animal ; Female ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Nerve Tissue Proteins/*genetics ; Pyrazoles/*pharmacology ; Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate/*agonists/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-01-19
    Description: Many procedures in modern clinical medicine rely on the use of electronic implants in treating conditions that range from acute coronary events to traumatic injury. However, standard permanent electronic hardware acts as a nidus for infection: bacteria form biofilms along percutaneous wires, or seed haematogenously, with the potential to migrate within the body and to provoke immune-mediated pathological tissue reactions. The associated surgical retrieval procedures, meanwhile, subject patients to the distress associated with re-operation and expose them to additional complications. Here, we report materials, device architectures, integration strategies, and in vivo demonstrations in rats of implantable, multifunctional silicon sensors for the brain, for which all of the constituent materials naturally resorb via hydrolysis and/or metabolic action, eliminating the need for extraction. Continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure and temperature illustrates functionality essential to the treatment of traumatic brain injury; the measurement performance of our resorbable devices compares favourably with that of non-resorbable clinical standards. In our experiments, insulated percutaneous wires connect to an externally mounted, miniaturized wireless potentiostat for data transmission. In a separate set-up, we connect a sensor to an implanted (but only partially resorbable) data-communication system, proving the principle that there is no need for any percutaneous wiring. The devices can be adapted to sense fluid flow, motion, pH or thermal characteristics, in formats that are compatible with the body's abdomen and extremities, as well as the deep brain, suggesting that the sensors might meet many needs in clinical medicine.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Seung-Kyun -- Murphy, Rory K J -- Hwang, Suk-Won -- Lee, Seung Min -- Harburg, Daniel V -- Krueger, Neil A -- Shin, Jiho -- Gamble, Paul -- Cheng, Huanyu -- Yu, Sooyoun -- Liu, Zhuangjian -- McCall, Jordan G -- Stephen, Manu -- Ying, Hanze -- Kim, Jeonghyun -- Park, Gayoung -- Webb, R Chad -- Lee, Chi Hwan -- Chung, Sangjin -- Wie, Dae Seung -- Gujar, Amit D -- Vemulapalli, Bharat -- Kim, Albert H -- Lee, Kyung-Mi -- Cheng, Jianjun -- Huang, Younggang -- Lee, Sang Hoon -- Braun, Paul V -- Ray, Wilson Z -- Rogers, John A -- F31MH101956/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Feb 4;530(7588):71-6. doi: 10.1038/nature16492. Epub 2016 Jan 18.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; Department of Neurological Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, Republic of Korea. ; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA. ; Institute of High Performance Computing, Singapore 138632, Singapore. ; Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, South Korea. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-713, South Korea. ; Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, The Center for Implantable Devices, Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA. ; School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA. ; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Skin Disease Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA. ; Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-703, South Korea. ; Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26779949" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Absorbable Implants/adverse effects ; Administration, Cutaneous ; Animals ; Body Temperature ; Brain/*metabolism/surgery ; Electronics/*instrumentation ; Equipment Design ; Hydrolysis ; Male ; Monitoring, Physiologic/adverse effects/*instrumentation ; Organ Specificity ; Pressure ; *Prostheses and Implants/adverse effects ; Rats ; Rats, Inbred Lew ; *Silicon ; Telemetry/instrumentation ; Wireless Technology/instrumentation
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    ISSN: 0935-6304
    Keywords: Capillary GC ; Enantiomer resolution ; Chiral stationary phase ; Derivated cyclodextrins ; Chemistry ; Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: Three new β-cyclodextrin derivatives, heptakis(6-O-isopropyldi-methylsilyl-2,3-di-O-ethyl)-β-cyclodextrin, heptakis(6-O-thexyldi-methylsilyl-2,3-di-O-ethyl)-β-cyclodextrin, and heptakis(6-O-cy-clohexyldimethyl-2,3-di-O-ethyl)-β-cyclodextrin (IPDE-β-CD, TXDE-β-CD, and CHDE-β-CD), were synthesized and the enan-tioselectivities of these three CD derivatives and heptakis(6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-di-O-ethyl)-β-cyclodextrin (TBDE-β-CD) were compared for GC separation of a range of chiral test com-pounds. In particular TXDE-β-CD showed much higher enentio-selectivity than TBDE-β-CD. Enentioselectivities of IPDE-β-CD and CHDE-β-CD are somewhat lower than that of TXDE-β-CD and CHDE-β-Cd are somewhat lower than that of TXDE-β-CD. These observations are indicative of significant effects of subtle changes in the structure of the 6-O-substituent on the enantioselec-tivity of the β-CD derivatives. The difference in enantioselectivities of the 6-O-substituted CD derivatives were explained in terms of relative contributions of the effects of hydrophobicity and steric hindrance of the substituent to the inclusion process. CHDE-β-CD showed the lowest enantioselectivity among the threederivatives. It is likely that the unfavorable steric hindrance of the bulky cyclo-hexyl group plays a greater role than the favorable hydrophobicity effect of the cyclohexyl group in the inclusion process in CHDE-β-CD. IPDE-β-CD showed lower selectivity than TXDE-β-CD and TBDE-β-CD. In the case of these CD derivatives having acyclic substituents the relative hydrophobicity of the substituent seems to be a dominant factor affecting the inclusion process. Isopropyl groups factor affecting the inclusion process. Isopropyl groups are less hydrophobic than thexyl and tert-butyl groups.
    Additional Material: 4 Ill.
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  • 4
    ISSN: 0570-0833
    Keywords: carbene complexes ; gold ; liquid crystals ; phasetransfer catalysis ; Chemistry ; General Chemistry
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Additional Material: 4 Ill.
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1434-1948
    Keywords: Metal string complexes ; Multicentered metal-metal multiple bond ; Quadruple bonds ; Metal-metal interactions ; Chromium ; Chemistry ; General Chemistry
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: The linear pentanuclear chromium complexes [CrII5(μ5-tpda)4Cl2] (1), [CrII5(μ5-tpda)4(NCS)2] (2), [CrIIICrII4(μ5-tpda)4F2](BF4) (3), and [CrIIICrII4(μ5-tpda)4F(OTf)](OTf) (4), with four all-syn tri(α-pyridyl)diamido dianion (tpda2-) ligands, have been prepared and structurally characterized. Compounds 1 and 2 possess a delocalized Cr(II)-Cr(II)-Cr(II)-Cr(II)-Cr(II) five-centred metal-metal bond of order 1.5. In both 1 and 2 two values for CrII-CrII bond lengths are found both; the outer ones connected with axial ligands are 2.284(1) and 2.285(2) Å, and the inner ones are 2.2405(8) and 2.246(1) Å, for 1 and 2, respectively. When compound 1 reacts with 2 equiv. of AgBF4 or Ag(OTf), a oxidation reaction takes place and one of the terminal chromium(II) ions is oxidized to produce [CrIIICrII4(μ5-tpda)4F2]BF4 (3) or [CrIIICrII4(μ5-tpda)4F(OTf)](OTf) (4). Two short Cr-Cr distances [1.969(2) and 2.138(2) Å for 3, 1.846(1) and 1.922(1) Å for 4] are found, with the presence of two quadruple bonds among four adjacent CrII ions. The fifth CrIII ion, which is separated from the neighboring CrII ion by 2.487(2) Å for 3 and 2.610(1) Å for 4, is simply a square pyramidal unit with no metal-metal bonding interaction.
    Additional Material: 6 Ill.
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  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Weinheim : Wiley-Blackwell
    Liebigs Annalen 2000 (2000), S. 335-348 
    ISSN: 1434-193X
    Keywords: Ozonolysis ; Cycloalkenes ; Carbonyl compounds ; Ozonides ; Chemistry ; General Chemistry
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: ---Ozonolysis reactions of a series of cyclic olefins 1 in the presence of carbonyl compounds 6 provided the corresponding cross-ozonides 42. Further reactions of ozonides 42 with the independently prepared carbonyl oxide +CH2-OO- gave diozonides of structure 43. All of the new ozonides have been isolated as pure substances and characterized by their 1H- and 13C-NMR spectra.
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  • 7
    ISSN: 0044-8249
    Keywords: Carbenkomplexe ; Flüssigkristalle ; Gold ; Phasentransferkatalyse ; Chemistry ; General Chemistry
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Additional Material: 4 Ill.
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  • 8
    ISSN: 0935-6304
    Keywords: Capillary GC ; Enantiomer resolution ; Chiral stationary phases ; Derivatized cyclodextrins ; Chemistry ; Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: Three new chiral selectors, 6-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-diethyl-a-cyclodextrin, 6-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-diethyl- and dipropyl-β-cyclodextrin (TBDE-α-CD, TBDE-β-CD, TBDP-β-CD) were synthesized and tested as chiral stationary phases in capillary gas chromatography. TBDE-β-CD in particular showed a high enan-tioselectivity for test chiral compounds due to good solubility in a polar polysiloxane (OV-1701). Enantioselectivity obtained with TBDE-β-CD was compared with that of 6-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin (TBDM-β-CD). Better enantiose-lectivity was obtained with TBDE-P-CD than with TBDM-β-CD for the test chiral compounds studied. This is probably due to greater effect of the increased hydrophobicity of TBDE-β-CD which favors inclusion of the analytes than the effect of increased steric hindrance. With TBDP-β-CD the less polar lactones are well separated due most likely to increased hydrophobicity of the propyl groups while the more polar are not well resolved. For TBDP-β-CD it is likely that the unfavorable steric hindrance is predominant over the favorable hydrophobicity of the propyl groups, thus hindering the formation of inclusion complexes of the alcohols with TBDP-β-CD. TBDE-α-CD was also a valuable chiral selector for the separation of small chiral molecules such as simple secondary alcohols and nitro-substituted alcohols.
    Additional Material: 3 Ill.
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  • 9
    ISSN: 0935-6304
    Keywords: A,C- and A,D-bridged calix[6]arene ; stationary phase ; capillary gas chromatography ; geometric and positional isomer separation ; Chemistry ; Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: ---A,C-Bridged (ACCX) and A,D-bridged isopropyldimethylsilylcalix[6]arene (ADCX) dissolved in OV-1701 were used as stationary phases in isothermal capillary gas chromatographic separation of some positional isomers. Retention factors and separation factors for the isomers were measured. The isomers investigated are well resolved on the two phases. Retention of all the solutes investigated is longer on ACCX than on ADCX. The longer retention on A,C-bridged calix[6]arene is probably due to extra inductive interactions of the solute molecule with the carbonyl moieties in the phase. Separation factors for closely eluting isomer pairs are similar on the two phases. This seems to indicate that the carbonyl moieties do not play an appreciable role in discriminating the isomer molecules on entering the cavity of the calixarene if the solute is retained by the inclusion process.
    Additional Material: 2 Tab.
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-08-17
    Description: Inactivation of tumour-suppressor genes by homozygous deletion is a prototypic event in the cancer genome, yet such deletions often encompass neighbouring genes. We propose that homozygous deletions in such passenger genes can expose cancer-specific therapeutic vulnerabilities when the collaterally deleted gene is a member of a functionally redundant family of genes carrying out an essential function. The glycolytic gene enolase 1 (ENO1) in the 1p36 locus is deleted in glioblastoma (GBM), which is tolerated by the expression of ENO2. Here we show that short-hairpin-RNA-mediated silencing of ENO2 selectively inhibits growth, survival and the tumorigenic potential of ENO1-deleted GBM cells, and that the enolase inhibitor phosphonoacetohydroxamate is selectively toxic to ENO1-deleted GBM cells relative to ENO1-intact GBM cells or normal astrocytes. The principle of collateral vulnerability should be applicable to other passenger-deleted genes encoding functionally redundant essential activities and provide an effective treatment strategy for cancers containing such genomic events.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3712624/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3712624/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Muller, Florian L -- Colla, Simona -- Aquilanti, Elisa -- Manzo, Veronica E -- Genovese, Giannicola -- Lee, Jaclyn -- Eisenson, Daniel -- Narurkar, Rujuta -- Deng, Pingna -- Nezi, Luigi -- Lee, Michelle A -- Hu, Baoli -- Hu, Jian -- Sahin, Ergun -- Ong, Derrick -- Fletcher-Sananikone, Eliot -- Ho, Dennis -- Kwong, Lawrence -- Brennan, Cameron -- Wang, Y Alan -- Chin, Lynda -- DePinho, Ronald A -- 3 P01 CA095616-08S1/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 57006984/Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- P01 CA095616/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01CA95616/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32-CA009361/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Aug 16;488(7411):337-42. doi: 10.1038/nature11331.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Genomic Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22895339" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Biomarkers, Tumor/deficiency/genetics ; Brain Neoplasms/*drug therapy/*genetics/pathology ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1/genetics ; DNA-Binding Proteins/deficiency/genetics ; Enzyme Inhibitors ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Genes, Essential/*genetics ; Genes, Tumor Suppressor ; Glioblastoma/*drug therapy/*genetics/pathology ; Homozygote ; Humans ; Hydroxamic Acids/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Mice ; Molecular Targeted Therapy/*methods ; Neoplasm Transplantation ; Phosphonoacetic Acid/analogs & derivatives/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Phosphopyruvate Hydratase/antagonists & inhibitors/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; RNA, Small Interfering/genetics ; Sequence Deletion/*genetics ; Tumor Suppressor Proteins/deficiency/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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