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  • Germany  (2)
  • 1
    Keywords: brain ; EXPRESSION ; Germany ; human ; GENE ; transcription ; MICE ; PATIENT ; ACTIVATION ; TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ; MARKER ; PHOSPHORYLATION ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; CAMP ; ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN ; PATTERNS ; CYCLIC-AMP ; molecular ; PATTERN ; LIGHT ; analysis ; MEDICINE ; CIRCADIAN CLOCK ; MAJOR DEPRESSION ; SUPRACHIASMATIC-NUCLEI
    Abstract: Activation of the transcription factor CREB by Ser142 phosphorylation is implicated in synchronizing circadian rhythmicity, which is disturbed in many depressive patients. Hence, one could assume that emotional behaviour and neuroendocrinological markers would be altered in CREBS142A mice, in which serine 142 is replaced by alanine, preventing phosphorylation at this residue. Moreover, associations of CREB Ser142 and seasonal affective disorder (SAD) might be detectable by the analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CREB gene close to the Ser142 residue in SAD patients. However, neither CREBS142A mice demonstrate features of depression, nor there is evidence for an association of SAD with the CREB genotypes. Nevertheless, in humans there is an association of a global seasonality score and circadian rhythmicity with the CREB genotypes in healthy control probands, but not SAD patients. This parallels the phenotype of CREBS142A mice, presenting alterations of circadian rhythm and light-induced entrainment. Thus it is reasonable to assume that CREB Ser142 represents a molecular switch in mice and men, which is responsible for the (dys)regulation of circadian rhythms. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17574346
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  • 2
    Keywords: brain ; RECEPTOR ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; CELL ; Germany ; SYSTEM ; SITE ; SITES ; GENE ; MICE ; FAMILY ; animals ; CONTRAST ; cell cycle ; CELL-CYCLE ; CYCLE ; MEMBER ; DELETION ; MOUSE ; MUTANT ; NERVOUS-SYSTEM ; PERFORMANCE ; NUMBER ; LINE ; inactivation ; PROGENITOR CELLS ; ABNORMALITIES ; CRE RECOMBINASE ; RE ; FAMILIES ; LEADS ; MICE LACKING ; CRE ; DEFECTS ; neurogenesis ; NUCLEAR ; function ; DEFECT ; progenitor cell ; animal ; RETINAL DEGENERATION ; NULL MICE ; PROGENITOR-CELL ; AGGRESSION ; aggressiveness ; ANXIETY ; blindness ; conditional mutant ; learning and memory ; RADIAL GLIA ; TLX
    Abstract: During embryogenesis, tailless, an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family, is expressed in the germinal zones of the brain and the developing retina, and is involved in regulating the cell cycle of progenitor cells. Consequently, a deletion of the tailless gene leads to decreased cell number with associated anatomical defects in the limbic system, the cortex and the eye. These structural abnormalities are associated with blindness, increased aggressiveness, poor performance in learning paradigms and reduced anxiousness. In order to assess the contribution of blindness to the behavioural changes, we established tailless mutant mice with intact visual abilities. We generated a mouse line in which the second exon of the tailless gene is flanked by loxP sites and crossed these animals with a transgenic line expressing the Cre recombinase in the neurogenic area of the developing brain, but not in the eye. The resulting animals have anatomically indistinguishable brains compared with tailless germline mutants, but are not blind. They are less anxious and much more aggressive than controls, like tailless germline mutants. In contrast to germline mutants, the conditional mutants are not impaired in fear conditioning. Furthermore, they show good performance in the Morris water-maze despite severely reduced hippocampal structures. Thus, the pathological aggressiveness and reduced anxiety found in tailless germline mutants are due to malformations caused by inactivation of the tailless gene in the brain, but the poor performance of tailless null mice in learning and memory paradigms is dependent on the associated blindness
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17953618
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