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  • 1
    Keywords: brain ; RECEPTOR ; CELL ; Germany ; KINASE ; EXPOSURE ; NEW-YORK ; PATIENT ; INDEX ; treatment ; cell culture ; culture ; TRIAL ; PLASMA ; DECREASE ; ATP ; SKELETAL-MUSCLE ; GLUCOSE ; DOUBLE-BLIND ; OXIDATIVE STRESS ; SMOKERS ; OXYGEN ; insulin ; INSULIN-RECEPTOR ; 3T3-L1 ADIPOCYTES ; CREATINE SUPPLEMENTATION ; HYDROGEN-PEROXIDE PRODUCTION ; LOW-CARBOHYDRATE ; obesity,hyperlipidemia,body fat,insulin reactivity,thiol antioxidant treatment ; REDOX STATE ; REVERSES ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION ; STRESS IMPAIRS INSULIN ; SUPPLEMENTATION ; TYROSINE KINASE DOMAIN
    Abstract: Insulin signaling is enhanced by moderate concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and suppressed by persistent exposure to ROS. Diabetic patients show abnormally high ROS levels and a decrease in insulin reactivity which is ameliorated by antioxidants, such as N-acetylcysteine (NAC). A similar effect of NAC has not been reported for non-diabetic subjects. We now show that the insulin receptor (IR) kinase is inhibited in cell culture by physiologic concentrations of cysteine. In two double-blind trials involving a total of 140 non-diabetic subjects we found furthermore that NAC increased the HOMA-R index (derived from the fasting insulin and glucose concentrations) in smokers and obese patients, but not in nonobese non-smokers. In obese patients NAC also caused a decrease in glucose tolerance and body fat mass. Simultaneous treatment with creatine, a metabolite utilized by skeletal muscle and brain for the interconversion of ADP and ATP, reversed the NAC-mediated increase in HOMA-R index and the decrease in glucose tolerance without preventing the decrease in body fat. As the obese and hyperlipidemic patients had lower plasma thiol concentrations than the normolipidemic subjects, our results suggest that low thiol levels facilitate the development of obesity. Supplementation of thiols plus creatine may reduce body fat without compromising glucose tolerance
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15007512
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  • 2
    Keywords: CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; BLOOD ; Germany ; RISK ; RNA ; RISK-FACTORS ; LESIONS ; PLASMA ; risk factors ; smoking ; LDL ; OVEREXPRESSION ; PERIPHERAL-BLOOD ; COX-2 ; LIPOPROTEINS ; N-ACETYL-CYSTEINE ; inflammation ; HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA ; SERUM ; ELISA ; free radicals ; MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES ; ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESIONS ; GLUTAMATE LEVELS ; hyperlipoproteinemia ; NITRIC-OXIDE-SYNTHASE ; OXIDIZED LOW-DENSITY
    Abstract: Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is expressed in macrophages of arteriosclerotic lesions and promotes inflammation. We investigated whether COX-2 is already expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of subjects possessing risk-related factors, such as in smokers and hyperlipidemics. PBMCs were isolated from the venous blood of normolipidemic nonsmokers (NL-NSM; n = 15), normolipidemic smokers (NL-SM; n = 12), hyperlipidemic nonsmokers (HL-NSM; n = 10), and hyperlipidemic smokers (HL-SM; n = 10). RNA from PBMCs was used for RT-PCR. Plasma concentrations of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) were rneasured by ELISA, those of glutamate and cystine by HPLC. The results show that COX-2 expression in PBMCs was significantly increased in the groups with cardiovascular risk factors (NL-SM, HL-SM, HL-NSM) compared with NL-NSM. COX-2 expression in PBMCs was positively Correlated with concentrations of total serum cholesterol, oxLDL, glutamate, or cystine. We suggest that the elevated COX-2 expression indicates a priming of PBMCs as a response to a systemic pro-oxidative and proinflammatory shift in subjects with cardiovascular risk factors, which might also contribute to growth and instability of arteriosclerotic lesions. (C) 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15607906
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