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  • Germany  (16)
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  • 1
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; TRIAL ; hormone ; HEALTH ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; OBESITY ; risk factors ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; RISK FACTOR ; EPIC ; EPIC study ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; MASS INDEX ; PH ; WEIGHT ; body weight ; fat distribution ; HEIGHT ; ADIPOSITY ; breast neoplasm ; HORMONE-REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; METAANALYSIS
    Abstract: The evidence for anthropometric factors influencing breast cancer risk is accumulating, but uncertainties remain concerning the role of fat distribution and potential effect modifiers. We used data from 73,542 premenopausal and 103,344 postmenopausal women from 9 European countries, taking part in the EPIC study. RRs from Cox regression models were calculated, using measured height, weight, BMI and waist and hip circumferences; categorized by cohort wide quintiles; and expressed as continuous variables, adjusted for study center, age and other risk factors. During 4.7 years of follow-up, 1,879 incident invasive breast cancers were identified. In postmenopausal women, current HRT modified the body size-breast cancer association. Among nonusers, weight, BMI and hip circumference were positively associated with breast cancer risk (all P-trend less than or equal to 0.002); obese women (BMI 〉 30) had a 31% excess risk compared to women with BMI 〈 25. Among HRT users, body measures were inversely but nonsignificantly associated with breast cancer. Excess breast cancer risk with HRT was particularly evident among lean women. Pooled RRs per height increment of 5 cm were 1.05 (95% CI 1.00-1.16) in premenopausal and 1.10 (95% CI 1.05-1.16) in postmenopausal women. Among premenopausal women, hip circumference was the only other measure significantly related to breast cancer (P-trend = 0.03), after accounting for BMI. In postmenopausal women not taking exogenous hormones, general obesity is a significant predictor of breast cancer, while abdominal fat assessed as waist-hip ratio or waist circumference was not related to excess risk when adjusted for BMI. Among premenopausal women, weight and BMI showed nonsignificant inverse associations with breast cancer. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15252848
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  • 2
    Keywords: Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; TIME ; PATIENT ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; WOMEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; BETA ; DIET ; INDIVIDUALS ; time trends ; TRENDS ; EUROPE ; DENMARK ; BREAST-CANCER RISK ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; STANDARD ; ADULT ; RE ; DETERMINANTS ; BODY-SIZE ; HEIGHT ; PARTICIPANTS ; BIRTH ; body height ; menarche ; SECULAR TRENDS ; URINE ESTROGENS
    Abstract: In the last two centuries, age at menarche has decreased in several European populations, whereas adult height has increased. It is unclear whether these trends have ceased in recent years or how age at menarche and height are related in individuals. In this study, the authors first investigated trends in age at menarche and adult height among 286,205 women from nine European countries by computing the mean age at menarche and height in 5-year birth cohorts, adjusted for differences in socioeconomic status. Second, the relation between age at menarche and height was estimated by linear regression models, adjusted for age at enrollment between 1992 and 1998 and socioeconomic status. Mean age at menarche decreased by 44 days per 5-year birth cohort (beta = -0.12, standard error = 0.002), varying from 18 days in the United Kingdom to 58 days in Spain and Germany. Women grew 0.29 cm taller per 5-year birth cohort (standard error = 0.007), varying from 0.42 cm in Italy to 0.98 cm in Denmark. Furthermore, women grew approximately 0.31 cm taller when menarche occurred 1 year later (range by country: 0.13-0.50 cm). Based on time trends, more recent birth cohorts have their menarche earlier and grow taller. However, women with earlier menarche reach a shorter adult height compared with women who have menarche at a later age
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16107566
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; DIETARY ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; questionnaires ; VEGETABLES ; NUTRIENTS ; carotenoids ; DIETARY FACTORS ; DETERMINANTS ; SUBTYPE ; FRUITS ; PART ; PARTICIPANTS ; CANCER INCIDENCE ; ALLIUM VEGETABLES ; FOOD GROUPS
    Abstract: Objective: The association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and risk of ovarian cancer is still unclear from a prospective point of view. Methods: Female participants (n = 325,640) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, free of any cancer at baseline, were followed on average for 6.3 years to develop ovarian cancer. During 2,049,346 person-years, 581 verified cases of primary, invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were accrued. Consumption of fruits and vegetables as well as subgroups of vegetables, estimated from validated dietary questionnaires and calibrated thereafter, was related to ovarian cancer incidence in multivariable hazard regression models. Histologic subtype specific analyses were done. Results: Total intake of fruit and vegetables, separately or combined, as well as subgroups of vegetables (fruiting, root, leafy vegetables, cabbages) was unrelated to risk of ovarian cancer. A high intake of garlic/onion vegetables was associated with a borderline significant reduced risk of this cancer. The examination by histologic subtype indicated some differential effects of fruit and vegetable intake on ovarian cancer risk. Conclusion: Overall, a high intake of fruits and vegetables did not seem to protect from ovarian cancer. Garlic/onion vegetables may exert a beneficial effect. The study of the histologic subtype of the tumor warrants further investigation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16284374
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; COHORT ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; MEN ; COUNTRIES ; DIETARY ; ALCOHOL ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; RELATIVE RISK ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; LEVEL ; INTERVAL ; FRUITS ; fruits and vegetables ; prospective ; prospective study ; RECOMMENDATIONS ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; CANCERS ; VARIABLES ; root vegetables ; SUBGROUPS ; upper aero-digestive cancer
    Abstract: Epidemiologic studies suggest that a high intake of fruits and vegetables is associated with decreased risk of cancers of the upper aero-digestive tract. We studied data from 345,904 subjects of the prospective European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) recruited in seven European countries, who had completed a dietary questionnaire in 1992-1998. During 2,182,560 person years of observation 352 histologically verified incident squamous cell cancer (SCC) cases (255 males; 97 females) of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, and esophagus were identified. Linear and restricted cubic spline Cox regressions were fitted on variables of intake of fruits and vegetables and adjusted for potential confounders. We observed a significant inverse association with combined total fruits and vegetables intake (estimated relative risk (RR) = 0.91; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.83-1.00 per 80 g/d of consumption), and nearly significant inverse associations in separate analyses with total fruits and total vegetables intake (RR: 0.97 (95% CI: 0.92-1.02) and RR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.78-1.02) per 40 g/d of consumption). Overall, vegetable subgroups were not related to risk with the exception of intake of root vegetables in men. Restricted cubic spline regression did not improve the linear model fits except for total fruits and vegetables and total fruits with a significant decrease in risk at low intake levels (〈 120 g/d) for fruits. Dietary recommendations should consider the potential benefit of increasing fruits and vegetables consumption for reducing the risk of cancers of the upper aero-digestive tract, particularly at low intake
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16841263
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; Germany ; COHORT ; RISK ; MICE ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; AGE ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; WOMEN ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; VALIDITY ; nutrition ; dehydroepiandrosterone ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; DETERMINANTS ; development ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; SERUM-LEVELS ; SULFATE ; HORMONES ; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE-SULFATE ; TESTOSTERONE ; prospective ; STEROID-HORMONES ; INCREASED RISK ; odds ratio ; CANCER-RISK ; OVARIAN ; BODY-MASS-INDEX
    Abstract: Few epidemiologic studies have examined the hypothesis that circulating androgens are involved in the development of ovarian cancer. We investigated the association between prediagnostic serum levels of androgens and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and ovarian cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. One hundred and ninety-two ovarian cancer cases and 346 matched controls not using exogenous hormones at baseline blood donation were eligible for the study. Serum levels of testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and SHBG were measured by direct immunoassays. Free testosterone (fT) was calculated according to mass action laws. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios adjusted for possible confounders. Overall, there was no association between serum concentrations of androgens or SHBG and ovarian cancer risk. In postmenopausal women, fT concentrations were inversely related to risk [highest versus lowest tertile odds ratio 0.45 (0.24-0.86); P-trend = 0-01]. Among women diagnosed before the age of 55 years, there was a negative association with SHBG and a positive association with fT and ovarian cancer risk, although these associations were not statistically significant. The present study suggests that circulating androgens and SHBG levels are not strongly associated with ovarian cancer risk, although levels of fT may be associated with an increased risk among women diagnosed at relatively young age. The heterogeneity of results on the associations of fT with ovarian cancer risk in postmenopausal women deserves further investigation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17220328
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; CELL ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SYSTEM ; cohort study ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; LYMPHOMA ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; etiology ; risk factors ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; B-CELL LYMPHOMA ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; ONCOLOGY ; DIETARY FACTORS ; ASSOCIATIONS ; IMMUNE-SYSTEM ; non-Hodgkin lymphoma ; INTERVAL ; FRUITS ; methods ; function ; prospective ; prospective study ; RISK-FACTOR ; HODGKIN LYMPHOMA ; B-CELL ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; DRINKING-WATER NITRATE
    Abstract: Introduction Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant diseases of cells of the immune system. The best-established risk factors are related to dys-regulation of immune function, and evidence suggests that factors such as dietary or lifestyle habits may be involved in the etiology. Material and methods In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 849 lymphoma cases were identified in a median follow-up period of 6.4 years. Fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated from validated dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association between fruit and vegetable intake with the risk of lymphomas overall and subentities. Results There was no overall association between total fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphoma [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-1.15 comparing highest with lowest quartile]. However, the risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) tended to be lower in participants with a high intake of total vegetables (HR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.23-1.02). Conclusion In this large prospective study, an inverse associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphomas overall could not be confirmed. Associations with lymphoma subentities such as DLBCL warrant further investigation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17443415
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  • 7
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; Germany ; PROSTATE ; COMMON ; COHORT ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; SAMPLE ; RELEASE ; RISK-FACTORS ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; prevention ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; SNP ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; RISK FACTOR ; POPULATIONS ; genetic polymorphism ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CODE ; SINGLE ; VARIANT ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SNPs ; LEVEL ; HAPLOTYPE ; HORMONES ; TESTOSTERONE ; prospective ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; BASE-LINE CHARACTERISTICS ; COMMON VARIANT ; LUTEINIZING-HORMONE ; androgens ; ESTROGENS ; CONSORTIUM ; androstenedione ; Genetic ; COMMON VARIANTS
    Abstract: Background: Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1) triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR) in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3). Methods: We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs) were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS) in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II), European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition ( EPIC), Multiethnic Cohort (MEC), Nurses' Health Study ( NHS), and Women's Health Study (WHS). Circulating levels of sex steroids ( androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone) were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results: Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion: Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19640273
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; Germany ; human ; FOLLOW-UP ; cohort study ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; incidence ; RISK ; RISKS ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; COUNTRIES ; DIETARY ; HYPERTENSION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; FOOD ; RELATIVE RISK ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; CELL CARCINOMA ; renal cell carcinoma ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; INCREASE ; INTERVAL ; CANCER INCIDENCE ; DIETARY ASSESSMENT METHODS ; KIDNEY CANCER
    Abstract: We examined the association between fruits and vegetables and risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Dietary intake data and complete follow-up information on cancer incidence were available for 375,851 participants recruited in EPIC centers of 8 countries. During an average follow-up of 6.2 years, 306 incident cases of RCC were identified. The associations of consumption of total vegetables, total fruits, combined total fruits and vegetables and specific subtypes of vegetables with RCC risk were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards, stratified by centre and adjusted for potential confounders. No significant associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and RCC risk were observed despite a wide range of intake. The estimated relative risks (95% confidence intervals [CI]) in men and women combined were 0.97 (0.85-1.11) per 40 g increase in vegetable intake, 1.03 (0.97-1.08) per 40 g increase in fruit intake and 1.02 (0.93-1.11) per 80 g increase in fruit and vegetable intake combined. Among the vegetable subtypes, an inverse association was observed for root vegetables (RR per 8 g increase: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.78-0.99). These results suggest that total consumption of fruits and vegetables is not related to risk of RCC, although we cannot exclude the possibility that very low consumption is related to higher risk. The relationship of specific fruit and vegetable subgroups with RCC risk warrant further investigation. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16425278
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  • 9
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; proliferation ; BLOOD ; CELL ; CELL-PROLIFERATION ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; colon ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; resistance ; NUMBER ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; OBESITY ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; RATES ; cancer risk ; BINDING-PROTEINS ; DIET ; case-control studies ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; EPIC ; nutrition ; FACTOR-I ; REGRESSION-MODELS ; physical activity ; BINDING PROTEIN ; insulin ; SERUM ; IGF-I ; ONCOLOGY ; BINDING-PROTEIN ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; secretion ; BODY-SIZE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; case control studies ; pancreatic ; BLOOD-GLUCOSE ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; rectum ; USA ; prospective ; rectal cancer ; prospective study ; CANCERS ; CANCER-RISK ; C-PEPTIDE ; IGFBP-1 ; colorectal ; BINDING PROTEINS ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; IGFBP-2 ; FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN-1 ; IGF ; insulin resistance ; GROWTH-FACTOR (IGF)-I
    Abstract: Western style diets and lifestyles are associated with increasing rates of obesity, diabetes and insulin resistance. Higher circulating insulin levels may modulate cell proliferation and apoptosis either directly or indirectly by increasing the bioactivity of IGF-I and decreasing the bioactivity of some of its binding proteins. The objective of this study was to determine the association of increasing levels of serum C-peptide, a biomarker of pancreatic insulin secretion, and IGF binding proteins (IGFBP) -1 and -2 with colorectal cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a large cohort involving 10 Western European countries. A total of 1,078 colorectal cancer cases were matched (age, date of blood donation, fasting status, gender, study center) to an equal number of control subjects. Relative cancer risks were estimated using conditional logistic regression models. Serum C-peptide concentration was positively associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk for the highest versus the lowest quintile (OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.16-2.09, p(trend) 〈 0.01), which was slightly attenuated after adjustment for BMI and physical activity (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.00-1.88, p(trend) = 0.10). When stratified by anatomical site, the cancer risk was stronger in the colon (OR 1.67, 95% CI = 1.14-2.46, p(trend) 〈 0.01) than in the rectum (OR 1.42, 95% CI = 0.90-2.25, p(trend) = 0.35). The cancer risk estimates were not heterogeneous by gender or fasting status. No clear colorectal cancer risk associations were observed for IGFBP-1 or -2. This large prospective study confirms that hyperinsulinemia, as determined by C-peptide levels, is associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk. (C) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17372899
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  • 10
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; GROWTH ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; Germany ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; LIGAND ; INDEX ; CARCINOGENESIS ; CELL-LINES ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; STIMULATION ; NUMBER ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; EPIC ; nutrition ; FOOD ; FOOD-INTAKE ; insulin ; BODIES ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; RE ; VARIANT ; INCREASE ; HEIGHT ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; LEVEL ; CANCER DEVELOPMENT ; single-nucleotide polymorphism ; MASS ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; IGFBP3 ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; ENGLAND ; IGFBP-3 ; FACTOR-BINDING ; body mass ; breast cancer risk ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; genetic variants ; DES-ACYL GHRELIN ; EXTREMELY OBESE CHILDREN ; GROWTH-HORMONE SECRETAGOGUE ; HEALTHY NORMAL-WEIGHT ; LEU72MET POLYMORPHISM ; PLASMA GHRELIN ; PREPROGHRELIN ISOFORM
    Abstract: Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, has two major functions: the stimulation of the growth hormone production and the stimulation of food intake. Accumulating evidence also suggests a role of ghrelin in cancer development. We conducted a case-control study on 1359 breast cancer cases and 2389 matched controls, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, to examine the association of common genetic variants in the genes coding for ghrelin (GHRL) and its receptor (GHSR) with anthropometric measures, circulating insulin growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 and breast cancer risk. Pair-wise tagging was used to select the 15 polymorphisms that represent the majority of common genetic variants across the GHRL and GHSR genes. A significant increase in breast cancer risk was observed in carriers of the GHRL rs171407-G allele (odds ratio: 1.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.0-1.4; P = 0.02). The GHRL single-nucleotide polymorphism rs375577 was associated with a 5% increase in IGF-I levels (P = 0.01). A number of GHRL and GHSR polymorphisms were associated with body mass index (BMI) and height (P between 〈 0.01 and 0.04). The false-positive report probability (FPRP) approach suggests that these results are noteworthy (FPRP 〈 0.20). The results presented here add to a growing body of evidence that GHRL variations are associated with BMI. Furthermore, we have observed evidence for association of GHRL polymorphisms with circulating IGF-I levels and with breast cancer risk. These associations, however, might also be due to chance findings and further large studies are needed to confirm our results
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18650939
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