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  • GENOMIC CHARACTERIZATION  (1)
  • HEAD  (1)
  • 1
    Keywords: IN-SITU ; NEOPLASIA ; ASSAY ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; HEAD ; VACCINE ; PREVALENCE ; TRENDS ; NECK-CANCER
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV) contribution in vulvar intraepithelial lesions (VIN) and invasive vulvar cancer (IVC) is not clearly established. This study provides novel data on HPV markers in a large series of VIN and IVC lesions. METHODS: Histologically confirmed VIN and IVC from 39 countries were assembled at the Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO). HPV-DNA detection was done by polymerase chain reaction using SPF-10 broad-spectrum primers and genotyping by reverse hybridisation line probe assay (LiPA25) (version 1). IVC cases were tested for p16(INK4a) by immunohistochemistry (CINtec histology kit, ROCHE). An IVC was considered HPV driven if both HPV-DNA and p16(INK4a) overexpression were observed simultaneously. Data analyses included algorithms allocating multiple infections to calculate type-specific contribution and logistic regression models to estimate adjusted prevalence (AP) and its 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Of 2296 cases, 587 were VIN and 1709 IVC. HPV-DNA was detected in 86.7% and 28.6% of the cases respectively. Amongst IVC cases, 25.1% were both HPV-DNA and p16(INK4a) positive. IVC cases were largely keratinising squamous cell carcinoma (KSCC) (N=1234). Overall prevalence of HPV related IVC cases was highest in younger women for any histological subtype. SCC with warty or basaloid features (SCC_WB) (N=326) were more likely to be HPV and p16(INK4a) positive (AP=69.5%, CI=63.6-74.8) versus KSCC (AP=11.5%, CI=9.7-13.5). HPV 16 was the commonest type (72.5%) followed by HPV 33 (6.5%) and HPV 18 (4.6%). Enrichment from VIN to IVC was significantly high for HPV 45 (8.5-fold). CONCLUSION: Combined data from HPV-DNA and p16(INK4a) testing are likely to represent a closer estimate of the real fraction of IVC induced by HPV. Our results indicate that HPV contribution in invasive vulvar cancer has probably been overestimated. HPV 16 remains the major player worldwide.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23886586
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  • 2
    Keywords: CLASSIFICATION ; recombination ; HIGH-THROUGHPUT ; ROLLING-CIRCLE AMPLIFICATION ; HEALTHY SKIN ; MAXIMUM-LIKELIHOOD ; GENOMIC CHARACTERIZATION ; Betapapillomavirus ; CETACEAN PAPILLOMAVIRUSES ; ALIGNMENTS
    Abstract: All amniotes are probably infected by specific papillomaviruses (PVs), but knowledge about PV diversity remains sparse. An insufficient taxon sampling, and a focus on humans as hosts, may perturb phylogenetic analyses leading to wrong conclusions about PV evolution. We performed a systematic approach to explore the diversity of PVs combining rolling circle amplification with the use of "universal" primers to search for the presence of novel PV sequences in animal samples. We communicate 12 sequences putatively corresponding to novel PVs gained from 10 host species in eight mammal families: Bovidae, Canidae, Cervidae, Equidae, Hominidae, Phocoenidae, Procyonidae and Pteropodidae. The phylogenetic position of the new sequences was inferred with an evolutionary placement algorithm under a Maximum Likelihood framework using a pre-computed, well-resolved tree constructed with the E1-E2-L1 gene sequences as a backbone. The new sequences were phylogenetically diverse and could be respectively placed with confidence within all four PV crown groups. The prevailing presence of sequences from the crown groups Alpha+Omikron-PVs and Beta+Xi-PVs may correspond to an increased viral diversity in these taxa, or rather reflect a combination of anthropocentric bias and preferential amplification from commonly used "universal" primers. Our results combined with literature data support the view that the number and diversity of animal PVs is overwhelmingly large.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22960206
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