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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-08-28
    Description: Water is crucial to plant growth and development. Environmental water deficiency triggers an osmotic stress signalling cascade, which induces short-term cellular responses to reduce water loss and long-term responses to remodel the transcriptional network and physiological and developmental processes. Several signalling components that have been identified by extensive genetic screens for altered sensitivities to osmotic stress seem to function downstream of the perception of osmotic stress. It is known that hyperosmolality and various other stimuli trigger increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Considering that in bacteria and animals osmosensing Ca(2+) channels serve as osmosensors, hyperosmolality-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases have been widely speculated to be involved in osmosensing in plants. However, the molecular nature of corresponding Ca(2+) channels remain unclear. Here we describe a hyperosmolality-gated calcium-permeable channel and its function in osmosensing in plants. Using calcium-imaging-based unbiased forward genetic screens we isolated Arabidopsis mutants that exhibit low hyperosmolality-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases. These mutants were rescreened for their cellular, physiological and developmental responses to osmotic stress, and those with clear combined phenotypes were selected for further physical mapping. One of the mutants, reduced hyperosmolality-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase 1 (osca1), displays impaired osmotic Ca(2+) signalling in guard cells and root cells, and attenuated water transpiration regulation and root growth in response to osmotic stress. OSCA1 is identified as a previously unknown plasma membrane protein and forms hyperosmolality-gated calcium-permeable channels, revealing that OSCA1 may be an osmosensor. OSCA1 represents a channel responsible for [Ca(2+)]i increases induced by a stimulus in plants, opening up new avenues for studying Ca(2+) machineries for other stimuli and providing potential molecular genetic targets for engineering drought-resistant crops.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yuan, Fang -- Yang, Huimin -- Xue, Yan -- Kong, Dongdong -- Ye, Rui -- Li, Chijun -- Zhang, Jingyuan -- Theprungsirikul, Lynn -- Shrift, Tayler -- Krichilsky, Bryan -- Johnson, Douglas M -- Swift, Gary B -- He, Yikun -- Siedow, James N -- Pei, Zhen-Ming -- England -- Nature. 2014 Oct 16;514(7522):367-71. doi: 10.1038/nature13593. Epub 2014 Aug 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA [2] Center on Plant Environmental Sensing, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036, China. ; 1] Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA [2]. ; Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA. ; Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25162526" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Arabidopsis/genetics/*metabolism ; Arabidopsis Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Calcium/*metabolism ; Calcium Channels/genetics/*metabolism ; *Calcium Signaling ; Cell Membrane/metabolism ; Cytoplasm/metabolism ; Droughts ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Membrane Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; *Osmotic Pressure ; Plant Roots/cytology/growth & development/metabolism ; Plant Transpiration ; Water/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-01-28
    Description: Inflammasomes are intracellular protein complexes that drive the activation of inflammatory caspases. So far, four inflammasomes involving NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4 and AIM2 have been described that recruit the common adaptor protein ASC to activate caspase-1, leading to the secretion of mature IL-1beta and IL-18 proteins. The NLRP3 inflammasome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several acquired inflammatory diseases as well as cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndromes (CAPS) caused by inherited NLRP3 mutations. Potassium efflux is a common step that is essential for NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by many stimuli. Despite extensive investigation, the molecular mechanism leading to NLRP3 activation in response to potassium efflux remains unknown. Here we report the identification of NEK7, a member of the family of mammalian NIMA-related kinases (NEK proteins), as an NLRP3-binding protein that acts downstream of potassium efflux to regulate NLRP3 oligomerization and activation. In the absence of NEK7, caspase-1 activation and IL-1beta release were abrogated in response to signals that activate NLRP3, but not NLRC4 or AIM2 inflammasomes. NLRP3-activating stimuli promoted the NLRP3-NEK7 interaction in a process that was dependent on potassium efflux. NLRP3 associated with the catalytic domain of NEK7, but the catalytic activity of NEK7 was shown to be dispensable for activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Activated macrophages formed a high-molecular-mass NLRP3-NEK7 complex, which, along with ASC oligomerization and ASC speck formation, was abrogated in the absence of NEK7. NEK7 was required for macrophages containing the CAPS-associated NLRP3(R258W) activating mutation to activate caspase-1. Mouse chimaeras reconstituted with wild-type, Nek7(-/-) or Nlrp3(-/-) haematopoietic cells showed that NEK7 was required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation in vivo. These studies demonstrate that NEK7 is an essential protein that acts downstream of potassium efflux to mediate NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and activation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉He, Yuan -- Zeng, Melody Y -- Yang, Dahai -- Motro, Benny -- Nunez, Gabriel -- R01AI063331/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01DK091191/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- T32 HL007517/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- T32DK094775/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- T32HL007517/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Feb 18;530(7590):354-7. doi: 10.1038/nature16959. Epub 2016 Jan 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology and Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; The State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China. ; The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26814970" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Biocatalysis ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Caspase 1/metabolism ; Catalytic Domain ; Cells, Cultured ; Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes/genetics ; Enzyme Activation ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Inflammasomes/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Interleukin-1beta/secretion ; Macrophages/metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Potassium/*metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/chemistry/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2011-09-06
    Description: PPARgamma is the functioning receptor for the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of antidiabetes drugs including rosiglitazone and pioglitazone. These drugs are full classical agonists for this nuclear receptor, but recent data have shown that many PPARgamma-based drugs have a separate biochemical activity, blocking the obesity-linked phosphorylation of PPARgamma by Cdk5. Here we describe novel synthetic compounds that have a unique mode of binding to PPARgamma, completely lack classical transcriptional agonism and block the Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation in cultured adipocytes and in insulin-resistant mice. Moreover, one such compound, SR1664, has potent antidiabetic activity while not causing the fluid retention and weight gain that are serious side effects of many of the PPARgamma drugs. Unlike TZDs, SR1664 also does not interfere with bone formation in culture. These data illustrate that new classes of antidiabetes drugs can be developed by specifically targeting the Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of PPARgamma.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3179551/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3179551/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Choi, Jang Hyun -- Banks, Alexander S -- Kamenecka, Theodore M -- Busby, Scott A -- Chalmers, Michael J -- Kumar, Naresh -- Kuruvilla, Dana S -- Shin, Youseung -- He, Yuanjun -- Bruning, John B -- Marciano, David P -- Cameron, Michael D -- Laznik, Dina -- Jurczak, Michael J -- Schurer, Stephan C -- Vidovic, Dusica -- Shulman, Gerald I -- Spiegelman, Bruce M -- Griffin, Patrick R -- 1RC4DK090861/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK31405/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK040936/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM084041/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM084041-03/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01-GM084041/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405-30/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405-31/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- RC4 DK090861/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- RC4 DK090861-01/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- S10 RR027270/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U24 DK059635/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- U54 MH074404/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54 MH074404-01/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54-MH074404/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Sep 4;477(7365):477-81. doi: 10.1038/nature10383.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cancer Biology and Division of Metabolism and Chronic Disease, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21892191" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: 3T3-L1 Cells ; Adipocytes/drug effects/metabolism ; Adipose Tissue, White/drug effects/metabolism ; Animals ; Biphenyl Compounds/chemistry/pharmacology ; Body Fluids/drug effects ; COS Cells ; Cercopithecus aethiops ; Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5/*antagonists & inhibitors ; Dietary Fats/pharmacology ; Disease Models, Animal ; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Hypoglycemic Agents/adverse effects/chemistry/*pharmacology ; Ligands ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Obese ; Models, Molecular ; Obesity/chemically induced/metabolism ; Osteogenesis/drug effects ; PPAR gamma/agonists/chemistry/*metabolism ; Phosphorylation/drug effects ; Phosphoserine/metabolism ; Thiazolidinediones/adverse effects/pharmacology ; Transcription, Genetic/drug effects ; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/pharmacology ; Weight Gain/drug effects
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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