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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-08-28
    Description: Water is crucial to plant growth and development. Environmental water deficiency triggers an osmotic stress signalling cascade, which induces short-term cellular responses to reduce water loss and long-term responses to remodel the transcriptional network and physiological and developmental processes. Several signalling components that have been identified by extensive genetic screens for altered sensitivities to osmotic stress seem to function downstream of the perception of osmotic stress. It is known that hyperosmolality and various other stimuli trigger increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Considering that in bacteria and animals osmosensing Ca(2+) channels serve as osmosensors, hyperosmolality-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases have been widely speculated to be involved in osmosensing in plants. However, the molecular nature of corresponding Ca(2+) channels remain unclear. Here we describe a hyperosmolality-gated calcium-permeable channel and its function in osmosensing in plants. Using calcium-imaging-based unbiased forward genetic screens we isolated Arabidopsis mutants that exhibit low hyperosmolality-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases. These mutants were rescreened for their cellular, physiological and developmental responses to osmotic stress, and those with clear combined phenotypes were selected for further physical mapping. One of the mutants, reduced hyperosmolality-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase 1 (osca1), displays impaired osmotic Ca(2+) signalling in guard cells and root cells, and attenuated water transpiration regulation and root growth in response to osmotic stress. OSCA1 is identified as a previously unknown plasma membrane protein and forms hyperosmolality-gated calcium-permeable channels, revealing that OSCA1 may be an osmosensor. OSCA1 represents a channel responsible for [Ca(2+)]i increases induced by a stimulus in plants, opening up new avenues for studying Ca(2+) machineries for other stimuli and providing potential molecular genetic targets for engineering drought-resistant crops.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yuan, Fang -- Yang, Huimin -- Xue, Yan -- Kong, Dongdong -- Ye, Rui -- Li, Chijun -- Zhang, Jingyuan -- Theprungsirikul, Lynn -- Shrift, Tayler -- Krichilsky, Bryan -- Johnson, Douglas M -- Swift, Gary B -- He, Yikun -- Siedow, James N -- Pei, Zhen-Ming -- England -- Nature. 2014 Oct 16;514(7522):367-71. doi: 10.1038/nature13593. Epub 2014 Aug 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA [2] Center on Plant Environmental Sensing, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036, China. ; 1] Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA [2]. ; Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA. ; Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25162526" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Arabidopsis/genetics/*metabolism ; Arabidopsis Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Calcium/*metabolism ; Calcium Channels/genetics/*metabolism ; *Calcium Signaling ; Cell Membrane/metabolism ; Cytoplasm/metabolism ; Droughts ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Membrane Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; *Osmotic Pressure ; Plant Roots/cytology/growth & development/metabolism ; Plant Transpiration ; Water/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-05-07
    Description: Pluripotency, the ability to generate any cell type of the body, is an evanescent attribute of embryonic cells. Transitory pluripotent cells can be captured at different time points during embryogenesis and maintained as embryonic stem cells or epiblast stem cells in culture. Since ontogenesis is a dynamic process in both space and time, it seems counterintuitive that these two temporal states represent the full spectrum of organismal pluripotency. Here we show that by modulating culture parameters, a stem-cell type with unique spatial characteristics and distinct molecular and functional features, designated as region-selective pluripotent stem cells (rsPSCs), can be efficiently obtained from mouse embryos and primate pluripotent stem cells, including humans. The ease of culturing and editing the genome of human rsPSCs offers advantages for regenerative medicine applications. The unique ability of human rsPSCs to generate post-implantation interspecies chimaeric embryos may facilitate our understanding of early human development and evolution.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wu, Jun -- Okamura, Daiji -- Li, Mo -- Suzuki, Keiichiro -- Luo, Chongyuan -- Ma, Li -- He, Yupeng -- Li, Zhongwei -- Benner, Chris -- Tamura, Isao -- Krause, Marie N -- Nery, Joseph R -- Du, Tingting -- Zhang, Zhuzhu -- Hishida, Tomoaki -- Takahashi, Yuta -- Aizawa, Emi -- Kim, Na Young -- Lajara, Jeronimo -- Guillen, Pedro -- Campistol, Josep M -- Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez -- Ross, Pablo J -- Saghatelian, Alan -- Ren, Bing -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 May 21;521(7552):316-21. doi: 10.1038/nature14413. Epub 2015 May 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Gene Expression Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Genomic Analysis Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Genomic Analysis Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Integrated Genomics, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0653, USA. ; 1] The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Gene Expression Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Life Science Center, Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan. ; Grado en Medicina, Universidad Catolica, San Antonio de Murcia, Campus de los Jeronimos, 135, Guadalupe 30107, Spain. ; 1] Grado en Medicina, Universidad Catolica, San Antonio de Murcia, Campus de los Jeronimos, 135, Guadalupe 30107, Spain [2] Fundacion Pedro Guillen, Clinica Cemtro, Avenida Ventisquero de la Condesa, 42, 28035 Madrid, Spain. ; Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Carrer Villarroel, 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain. ; University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA. ; The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Peptide Biology Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25945737" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Culture Techniques/methods ; Cell Line ; *Chimera ; Embryonic Stem Cells/cytology ; Female ; Germ Layers/cytology ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology ; Male ; Mice ; Pan troglodytes ; Pluripotent Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism ; Regenerative Medicine ; Species Specificity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-03-24
    Description: The general transcription factor IID (TFIID) plays a central role in the initiation of RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent transcription by nucleating pre-initiation complex (PIC) assembly at the core promoter. TFIID comprises the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and 13 TBP-associated factors (TAF1-13), which specifically interact with a variety of core promoter DNA sequences. Here we present the structure of human TFIID in complex with TFIIA and core promoter DNA, determined by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy at sub-nanometre resolution. All core promoter elements are contacted by subunits of TFIID, with TAF1 and TAF2 mediating major interactions with the downstream promoter. TFIIA bridges the TBP-TATA complex with lobe B of TFIID. We also present the cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of a fully assembled human TAF-less PIC. Superposition of common elements between the two structures provides novel insights into the general role of TFIID in promoter recognition, PIC assembly, and transcription initiation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4856295/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4856295/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Louder, Robert K -- He, Yuan -- Lopez-Blanco, Jose Ramon -- Fang, Jie -- Chacon, Pablo -- Nogales, Eva -- GM008295/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM63072/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM063072/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 31;531(7596):604-9. doi: 10.1038/nature17394. Epub 2016 Mar 23.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Biophysics Graduate Group, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. ; QB3 Institute, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. ; Molecular Biophysics and Integrative Bioimaging Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. ; Department of Biological Physical Chemistry, Rocasolano Physical Chemistry Institute, CSIC, Serrano 119, Madrid 28006, Spain. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27007846" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cryoelectron Microscopy ; DNA/chemistry/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Humans ; Models, Molecular ; Promoter Regions, Genetic/*genetics ; Protein Binding ; Substrate Specificity ; TATA Box/genetics ; TATA-Binding Protein Associated Factors/chemistry/metabolism/ultrastructure ; TATA-Box Binding Protein/chemistry/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Transcription Factor TFIIA/chemistry/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Transcription Factor TFIID/chemistry/*metabolism/*ultrastructure ; *Transcription Initiation, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2011-07-02
    Description: The proteins encoded by ATRX and DAXX participate in chromatin remodeling at telomeres and other genomic sites. Because inactivating mutations of these genes are common in human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs), we examined the telomere status of these tumors. We found that 61% of PanNETs displayed abnormal telomeres that are characteristic of a telomerase-independent telomere maintenance mechanism termed ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres). All of the PanNETs exhibiting these abnormal telomeres had ATRX or DAXX mutations or loss of nuclear ATRX or DAXX protein. ATRX mutations also correlate with abnormal telomeres in tumors of the central nervous system. These data suggest that an alternative telomere maintenance function may operate in human tumors with alterations in the ATRX or DAXX genes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3174141/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3174141/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Heaphy, Christopher M -- de Wilde, Roeland F -- Jiao, Yuchen -- Klein, Alison P -- Edil, Barish H -- Shi, Chanjuan -- Bettegowda, Chetan -- Rodriguez, Fausto J -- Eberhart, Charles G -- Hebbar, Sachidanand -- Offerhaus, G Johan -- McLendon, Roger -- Rasheed, B Ahmed -- He, Yiping -- Yan, Hai -- Bigner, Darell D -- Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko -- Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi -- Riggins, Gregory J -- Kinzler, Kenneth W -- Vogelstein, Bert -- Hruban, Ralph H -- Maitra, Anirban -- Papadopoulos, Nickolas -- Meeker, Alan K -- P01 CA134292/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA134292-01A1/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA062924/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA062924-06/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 NS020023/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P50 NS020023-28/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA113669/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA113669-06/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA121113/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA121113-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA140316/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA140316-01A1/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS055089/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS055089-01A2/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R37 CA011898/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 CA011898-41/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jul 22;333(6041):425. doi: 10.1126/science.1207313. Epub 2011 Jun 30.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21719641" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/*genetics/metabolism ; Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine/*genetics/pathology/physiopathology ; Cell Nucleus/metabolism ; Central Nervous System Neoplasms/*genetics/pathology/physiopathology ; Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly ; DNA Helicases/*genetics/metabolism ; Humans ; In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence ; Mutant Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Mutation ; Nuclear Proteins/*genetics/metabolism ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*genetics/pathology/physiopathology ; Phenotype ; Telomere/*physiology/ultrastructure
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-07-15
    Description: Insulin-induced gene 1 (Insig-1) and Insig-2 are endoplasmic reticulum membrane-embedded sterol sensors that regulate the cellular accumulation of sterols. Despite their physiological importance, the structural information on Insigs remains limited. Here we report the high-resolution structures of MvINS, an Insig homolog from Mycobacterium vanbaalenii. MvINS exists as a homotrimer. Each protomer comprises six transmembrane segments (TMs), with TM3 and TM4 contributing to homotrimerization. The six TMs enclose a V-shaped cavity that can accommodate a diacylglycerol molecule. A homology-based structural model of human Insig-2, together with biochemical characterizations, suggest that the central cavity of Insig-2 accommodates 25-hydroxycholesterol, whereas TM3 and TM4 engage in Scap binding. These analyses provide an important framework for further functional and mechanistic understanding of Insig proteins and the sterol regulatory element-binding protein pathway.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4704858/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4704858/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ren, Ruobing -- Zhou, Xinhui -- He, Yuan -- Ke, Meng -- Wu, Jianping -- Liu, Xiaohui -- Yan, Chuangye -- Wu, Yixuan -- Gong, Xin -- Lei, Xiaoguang -- Yan, S Frank -- Radhakrishnan, Arun -- Yan, Nieng -- HL-20948/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01 HL020948/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jul 10;349(6244):187-91. doi: 10.1126/science.aab1091.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉State Key Laboratory of Membrane Biology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing 102206, China. ; Molecular Design and Chemical Biology, Therapeutic Modalities, Roche Pharma Research and Early Development, Roche Innovation Center Shanghai, Shanghai 201203, China. ; Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9046, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26160948" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Bacterial Proteins/*chemistry ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Diglycerides/chemistry ; Humans ; Hydroxycholesterols/chemistry/*metabolism ; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/*chemistry ; Membrane Proteins/*chemistry ; Mycobacterium/*metabolism ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins/*chemistry
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-07-11
    Description: Human pluripotent stem cells hold potential for regenerative medicine, but available cell types have significant limitations. Although embryonic stem cells (ES cells) from in vitro fertilized embryos (IVF ES cells) represent the 'gold standard', they are allogeneic to patients. Autologous induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) are prone to epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations. To determine whether such abnormalities are intrinsic to somatic cell reprogramming or secondary to the reprogramming method, genetically matched sets of human IVF ES cells, iPS cells and nuclear transfer ES cells (NT ES cells) derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) were subjected to genome-wide analyses. Both NT ES cells and iPS cells derived from the same somatic cells contained comparable numbers of de novo copy number variations. In contrast, DNA methylation and transcriptome profiles of NT ES cells corresponded closely to those of IVF ES cells, whereas iPS cells differed and retained residual DNA methylation patterns typical of parental somatic cells. Thus, human somatic cells can be faithfully reprogrammed to pluripotency by SCNT and are therefore ideal for cell replacement therapies.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ma, Hong -- Morey, Robert -- O'Neil, Ryan C -- He, Yupeng -- Daughtry, Brittany -- Schultz, Matthew D -- Hariharan, Manoj -- Nery, Joseph R -- Castanon, Rosa -- Sabatini, Karen -- Thiagarajan, Rathi D -- Tachibana, Masahito -- Kang, Eunju -- Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca -- Ahmed, Riffat -- Gutierrez, Nuria Marti -- Van Dyken, Crystal -- Polat, Alim -- Sugawara, Atsushi -- Sparman, Michelle -- Gokhale, Sumita -- Amato, Paula -- Wolf, Don P -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Laurent, Louise C -- Mitalipov, Shoukhrat -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jul 10;511(7508):177-83. doi: 10.1038/nature13551. Epub 2014 Jul 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [3]. ; 1] Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2]. ; 1] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Bioinformatics Program, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [2] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, South Miyagi Medical Center, Shibata-gun, Miyagi 989-1253, Japan (M.T.); Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden (A.P.). ; Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; University Pathologists LLC, Boston University School of Medicine, Roger Williams Medical Center, Providence, Rhode Island 02118, USA. ; Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. ; 1] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [3] Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25008523" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line ; *Cellular Reprogramming ; Chromosome Aberrations ; Chromosomes, Human, X/genetics/metabolism ; DNA Copy Number Variations ; DNA Methylation ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Genomic Imprinting ; Humans ; Nuclear Transfer Techniques/standards ; Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology/*metabolism ; Transcriptome
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signalling to numerous G-protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveals an overall architecture of the rhodopsin-arrestin assembly in which rhodopsin uses distinct structural elements, including transmembrane helix 7 and helix 8, to recruit arrestin. Correspondingly, arrestin adopts the pre-activated conformation, with a approximately 20 degrees rotation between the amino and carboxy domains, which opens up a cleft in arrestin to accommodate a short helix formed by the second intracellular loop of rhodopsin. This structure provides a basis for understanding GPCR-mediated arrestin-biased signalling and demonstrates the power of X-ray lasers for advancing the frontiers of structural biology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521999/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521999/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Yanyong -- Zhou, X Edward -- Gao, Xiang -- He, Yuanzheng -- Liu, Wei -- Ishchenko, Andrii -- Barty, Anton -- White, Thomas A -- Yefanov, Oleksandr -- Han, Gye Won -- Xu, Qingping -- de Waal, Parker W -- Ke, Jiyuan -- Tan, M H Eileen -- Zhang, Chenghai -- Moeller, Arne -- West, Graham M -- Pascal, Bruce D -- Van Eps, Ned -- Caro, Lydia N -- Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A -- Lee, Regina J -- Suino-Powell, Kelly M -- Gu, Xin -- Pal, Kuntal -- Ma, Jinming -- Zhi, Xiaoyong -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Williams, Garth J -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Gati, Cornelius -- Zatsepin, Nadia A -- Wang, Dingjie -- James, Daniel -- Basu, Shibom -- Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi -- Conrad, Chelsie E -- Coe, Jesse -- Liu, Haiguang -- Lisova, Stella -- Kupitz, Christopher -- Grotjohann, Ingo -- Fromme, Raimund -- Jiang, Yi -- Tan, Minjia -- Yang, Huaiyu -- Li, Jun -- Wang, Meitian -- Zheng, Zhong -- Li, Dianfan -- Howe, Nicole -- Zhao, Yingming -- Standfuss, Jorg -- Diederichs, Kay -- Dong, Yuhui -- Potter, Clinton S -- Carragher, Bridget -- Caffrey, Martin -- Jiang, Hualiang -- Chapman, Henry N -- Spence, John C H -- Fromme, Petra -- Weierstall, Uwe -- Ernst, Oliver P -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Gurevich, Vsevolod V -- Griffin, Patrick R -- Hubbell, Wayne L -- Stevens, Raymond C -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Melcher, Karsten -- Xu, H Eric -- DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- EY005216/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- EY011500/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM077561/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM095583/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM097463/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM102545/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM103310/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM104212/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM108635/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P30EY000331/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103310/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41GM103393/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41RR001209/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073210/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK066202/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY011500/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM087413/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM109955/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- S10 RR027270/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094586/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094599/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 30;523(7562):561-7. doi: 10.1038/nature14656. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA. ; Department of Chemistry, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. ; Joint Center for Structural Genomics, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA [2] Department of Obstetrics &Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ; The National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy, New York Structural Biology Center, New York, New York 10027, USA. ; Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida, Jupiter, Florida 33458, USA. ; Jules Stein Eye Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ; Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA [2] BioXFEL, NSF Science and Technology Center, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Haidian District, Beijing 10084, China. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China. ; Department of Obstetrics &Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ; Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland. ; Department of Biological Sciences, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; School of Medicine and School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland. ; 1] BioXFEL, NSF Science and Technology Center, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA [2] Ben May Department for Cancer Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ; Laboratory of Biomolecular Research at Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland. ; Department of Biology, Universitat Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz, Germany. ; Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China. ; 1] Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, 22761 Hamburg, Germany. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada [2] Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; 1] Department of Chemistry, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [2] Department of Biological Sciences, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [3] iHuman Institute, ShanghaiTech University, 2F Building 6, 99 Haike Road, Pudong New District, Shanghai 201210, China. ; 1] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA [2] VARI-SIMM Center, Center for Structure and Function of Drug Targets, CAS-Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200343" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Arrestin/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disulfides/chemistry/metabolism ; Humans ; Lasers ; Mice ; Models, Molecular ; Multiprotein Complexes/biosynthesis/chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Reproducibility of Results ; Rhodopsin/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; X-Rays
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2016-01-28
    Description: Inflammasomes are intracellular protein complexes that drive the activation of inflammatory caspases. So far, four inflammasomes involving NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4 and AIM2 have been described that recruit the common adaptor protein ASC to activate caspase-1, leading to the secretion of mature IL-1beta and IL-18 proteins. The NLRP3 inflammasome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several acquired inflammatory diseases as well as cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndromes (CAPS) caused by inherited NLRP3 mutations. Potassium efflux is a common step that is essential for NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by many stimuli. Despite extensive investigation, the molecular mechanism leading to NLRP3 activation in response to potassium efflux remains unknown. Here we report the identification of NEK7, a member of the family of mammalian NIMA-related kinases (NEK proteins), as an NLRP3-binding protein that acts downstream of potassium efflux to regulate NLRP3 oligomerization and activation. In the absence of NEK7, caspase-1 activation and IL-1beta release were abrogated in response to signals that activate NLRP3, but not NLRC4 or AIM2 inflammasomes. NLRP3-activating stimuli promoted the NLRP3-NEK7 interaction in a process that was dependent on potassium efflux. NLRP3 associated with the catalytic domain of NEK7, but the catalytic activity of NEK7 was shown to be dispensable for activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Activated macrophages formed a high-molecular-mass NLRP3-NEK7 complex, which, along with ASC oligomerization and ASC speck formation, was abrogated in the absence of NEK7. NEK7 was required for macrophages containing the CAPS-associated NLRP3(R258W) activating mutation to activate caspase-1. Mouse chimaeras reconstituted with wild-type, Nek7(-/-) or Nlrp3(-/-) haematopoietic cells showed that NEK7 was required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation in vivo. These studies demonstrate that NEK7 is an essential protein that acts downstream of potassium efflux to mediate NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and activation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉He, Yuan -- Zeng, Melody Y -- Yang, Dahai -- Motro, Benny -- Nunez, Gabriel -- R01AI063331/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01DK091191/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- T32 HL007517/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- T32DK094775/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- T32HL007517/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Feb 18;530(7590):354-7. doi: 10.1038/nature16959. Epub 2016 Jan 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology and Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; The State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China. ; The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26814970" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Biocatalysis ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Caspase 1/metabolism ; Catalytic Domain ; Cells, Cultured ; Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes/genetics ; Enzyme Activation ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Inflammasomes/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Interleukin-1beta/secretion ; Macrophages/metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Potassium/*metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/chemistry/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2011-09-06
    Description: PPARgamma is the functioning receptor for the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of antidiabetes drugs including rosiglitazone and pioglitazone. These drugs are full classical agonists for this nuclear receptor, but recent data have shown that many PPARgamma-based drugs have a separate biochemical activity, blocking the obesity-linked phosphorylation of PPARgamma by Cdk5. Here we describe novel synthetic compounds that have a unique mode of binding to PPARgamma, completely lack classical transcriptional agonism and block the Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation in cultured adipocytes and in insulin-resistant mice. Moreover, one such compound, SR1664, has potent antidiabetic activity while not causing the fluid retention and weight gain that are serious side effects of many of the PPARgamma drugs. Unlike TZDs, SR1664 also does not interfere with bone formation in culture. These data illustrate that new classes of antidiabetes drugs can be developed by specifically targeting the Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of PPARgamma.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3179551/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3179551/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Choi, Jang Hyun -- Banks, Alexander S -- Kamenecka, Theodore M -- Busby, Scott A -- Chalmers, Michael J -- Kumar, Naresh -- Kuruvilla, Dana S -- Shin, Youseung -- He, Yuanjun -- Bruning, John B -- Marciano, David P -- Cameron, Michael D -- Laznik, Dina -- Jurczak, Michael J -- Schurer, Stephan C -- Vidovic, Dusica -- Shulman, Gerald I -- Spiegelman, Bruce M -- Griffin, Patrick R -- 1RC4DK090861/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK31405/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK040936/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM084041/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM084041-03/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01-GM084041/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405-30/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405-31/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- RC4 DK090861/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- RC4 DK090861-01/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- S10 RR027270/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U24 DK059635/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- U54 MH074404/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54 MH074404-01/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54-MH074404/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Sep 4;477(7365):477-81. doi: 10.1038/nature10383.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cancer Biology and Division of Metabolism and Chronic Disease, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21892191" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: 3T3-L1 Cells ; Adipocytes/drug effects/metabolism ; Adipose Tissue, White/drug effects/metabolism ; Animals ; Biphenyl Compounds/chemistry/pharmacology ; Body Fluids/drug effects ; COS Cells ; Cercopithecus aethiops ; Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5/*antagonists & inhibitors ; Dietary Fats/pharmacology ; Disease Models, Animal ; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Hypoglycemic Agents/adverse effects/chemistry/*pharmacology ; Ligands ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Obese ; Models, Molecular ; Obesity/chemically induced/metabolism ; Osteogenesis/drug effects ; PPAR gamma/agonists/chemistry/*metabolism ; Phosphorylation/drug effects ; Phosphoserine/metabolism ; Thiazolidinediones/adverse effects/pharmacology ; Transcription, Genetic/drug effects ; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/pharmacology ; Weight Gain/drug effects
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-09-21
    Description: The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas belongs to one of the most species-rich but genomically poorly explored phyla, the Mollusca. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the oyster genome using short reads and a fosmid-pooling strategy, along with transcriptomes of development and stress response and the proteome of the shell. The oyster genome is highly polymorphic and rich in repetitive sequences, with some transposable elements still actively shaping variation. Transcriptome studies reveal an extensive set of genes responding to environmental stress. The expansion of genes coding for heat shock protein 70 and inhibitors of apoptosis is probably central to the oyster's adaptation to sessile life in the highly stressful intertidal zone. Our analyses also show that shell formation in molluscs is more complex than currently understood and involves extensive participation of cells and their exosomes. The oyster genome sequence fills a void in our understanding of the Lophotrochozoa.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Guofan -- Fang, Xiaodong -- Guo, Ximing -- Li, Li -- Luo, Ruibang -- Xu, Fei -- Yang, Pengcheng -- Zhang, Linlin -- Wang, Xiaotong -- Qi, Haigang -- Xiong, Zhiqiang -- Que, Huayong -- Xie, Yinlong -- Holland, Peter W H -- Paps, Jordi -- Zhu, Yabing -- Wu, Fucun -- Chen, Yuanxin -- Wang, Jiafeng -- Peng, Chunfang -- Meng, Jie -- Yang, Lan -- Liu, Jun -- Wen, Bo -- Zhang, Na -- Huang, Zhiyong -- Zhu, Qihui -- Feng, Yue -- Mount, Andrew -- Hedgecock, Dennis -- Xu, Zhe -- Liu, Yunjie -- Domazet-Loso, Tomislav -- Du, Yishuai -- Sun, Xiaoqing -- Zhang, Shoudu -- Liu, Binghang -- Cheng, Peizhou -- Jiang, Xuanting -- Li, Juan -- Fan, Dingding -- Wang, Wei -- Fu, Wenjing -- Wang, Tong -- Wang, Bo -- Zhang, Jibiao -- Peng, Zhiyu -- Li, Yingxiang -- Li, Na -- Wang, Jinpeng -- Chen, Maoshan -- He, Yan -- Tan, Fengji -- Song, Xiaorui -- Zheng, Qiumei -- Huang, Ronglian -- Yang, Hailong -- Du, Xuedi -- Chen, Li -- Yang, Mei -- Gaffney, Patrick M -- Wang, Shan -- Luo, Longhai -- She, Zhicai -- Ming, Yao -- Huang, Wen -- Zhang, Shu -- Huang, Baoyu -- Zhang, Yong -- Qu, Tao -- Ni, Peixiang -- Miao, Guoying -- Wang, Junyi -- Wang, Qiang -- Steinberg, Christian E W -- Wang, Haiyan -- Li, Ning -- Qian, Lumin -- Zhang, Guojie -- Li, Yingrui -- Yang, Huanming -- Liu, Xiao -- Wang, Jian -- Yin, Ye -- Wang, Jun -- 268513/European Research Council/International -- England -- Nature. 2012 Oct 4;490(7418):49-54. doi: 10.1038/nature11413. Epub 2012 Sep 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22992520" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptation, Physiological/*genetics ; Animal Shells/chemistry/*growth & development ; Animals ; Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/genetics ; Crassostrea/*genetics ; DNA Transposable Elements/genetics ; Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental/genetics ; Genes, Homeobox/genetics ; Genome/*genetics ; Genomics ; HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics ; Humans ; Larva/genetics/growth & development ; Mass Spectrometry ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Polymorphism, Genetic/genetics ; Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Stress, Physiological/genetics/*physiology ; Transcriptome/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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