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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-08-29
    Description: The transcriptome is the readout of the genome. Identifying common features in it across distant species can reveal fundamental principles. To this end, the ENCODE and modENCODE consortia have generated large amounts of matched RNA-sequencing data for human, worm and fly. Uniform processing and comprehensive annotation of these data allow comparison across metazoan phyla, extending beyond earlier within-phylum transcriptome comparisons and revealing ancient, conserved features. Specifically, we discover co-expression modules shared across animals, many of which are enriched in developmental genes. Moreover, we use expression patterns to align the stages in worm and fly development and find a novel pairing between worm embryo and fly pupae, in addition to the embryo-to-embryo and larvae-to-larvae pairings. Furthermore, we find that the extent of non-canonical, non-coding transcription is similar in each organism, per base pair. Finally, we find in all three organisms that the gene-expression levels, both coding and non-coding, can be quantitatively predicted from chromatin features at the promoter using a 'universal model' based on a single set of organism-independent parameters.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4155737/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4155737/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Gerstein, Mark B -- Rozowsky, Joel -- Yan, Koon-Kiu -- Wang, Daifeng -- Cheng, Chao -- Brown, James B -- Davis, Carrie A -- Hillier, LaDeana -- Sisu, Cristina -- Li, Jingyi Jessica -- Pei, Baikang -- Harmanci, Arif O -- Duff, Michael O -- Djebali, Sarah -- Alexander, Roger P -- Alver, Burak H -- Auerbach, Raymond -- Bell, Kimberly -- Bickel, Peter J -- Boeck, Max E -- Boley, Nathan P -- Booth, Benjamin W -- Cherbas, Lucy -- Cherbas, Peter -- Di, Chao -- Dobin, Alex -- Drenkow, Jorg -- Ewing, Brent -- Fang, Gang -- Fastuca, Megan -- Feingold, Elise A -- Frankish, Adam -- Gao, Guanjun -- Good, Peter J -- Guigo, Roderic -- Hammonds, Ann -- Harrow, Jen -- Hoskins, Roger A -- Howald, Cedric -- Hu, Long -- Huang, Haiyan -- Hubbard, Tim J P -- Huynh, Chau -- Jha, Sonali -- Kasper, Dionna -- Kato, Masaomi -- Kaufman, Thomas C -- Kitchen, Robert R -- Ladewig, Erik -- Lagarde, Julien -- Lai, Eric -- Leng, Jing -- Lu, Zhi -- MacCoss, Michael -- May, Gemma -- McWhirter, Rebecca -- Merrihew, Gennifer -- Miller, David M -- Mortazavi, Ali -- Murad, Rabi -- Oliver, Brian -- Olson, Sara -- Park, Peter J -- Pazin, Michael J -- Perrimon, Norbert -- Pervouchine, Dmitri -- Reinke, Valerie -- Reymond, Alexandre -- Robinson, Garrett -- Samsonova, Anastasia -- Saunders, Gary I -- Schlesinger, Felix -- Sethi, Anurag -- Slack, Frank J -- Spencer, William C -- Stoiber, Marcus H -- Strasbourger, Pnina -- Tanzer, Andrea -- Thompson, Owen A -- Wan, Kenneth H -- Wang, Guilin -- Wang, Huaien -- Watkins, Kathie L -- Wen, Jiayu -- Wen, Kejia -- Xue, Chenghai -- Yang, Li -- Yip, Kevin -- Zaleski, Chris -- Zhang, Yan -- Zheng, Henry -- Brenner, Steven E -- Graveley, Brenton R -- Celniker, Susan E -- Gingeras, Thomas R -- Waterston, Robert -- 1U01HG007031-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- 5U01HG004695-04/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- 5U54HG004555/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- HG007000/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- HG007355/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- K99 HG006698/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA045508/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM076655/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- RC2-HG005639/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- T15 LM007056/LM/NLM NIH HHS/ -- T32 HD060555/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG 004263/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG004261/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG004271/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG007031/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01-HG004261/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01HG004258/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U41 HG007000/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U41 HG007234/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U41 HG007355/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG004555/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG006944/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG006994/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG007004/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG007005/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54HG007005/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- WT098051/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- ZIA DK015600-18/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Aug 28;512(7515):445-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13424.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Yale University, Bass 432, 266 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA [2] Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, Bass 432, 266 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA [3] Department of Computer Science, Yale University, 51 Prospect Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA [4] [5]. ; 1] Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Yale University, Bass 432, 266 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA [2] Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, Bass 432, 266 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA [3]. ; 1] Department of Genetics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755, USA [2] Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Sciences, Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766, USA [3]. ; 1] Department of Genome Dynamics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Department of Statistics, University of California, Berkeley, 367 Evans Hall, Berkeley, California 94720-3860, USA [3]. ; 1] Functional Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Genome Sciences and University of Washington School of Medicine, William H. Foege Building S350D, 1705 Northeast Pacific Street, Box 355065 Seattle, Washington 98195-5065, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Statistics, University of California, Berkeley, 367 Evans Hall, Berkeley, California 94720-3860, USA [2] Department of Statistics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1554, USA [3] Department of Human Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-7088, USA [4]. ; 1] Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Institute for Systems Genomics, University of Connecticut Health Center, 400 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, Connecticut 06030, USA [2]. ; 1] Centre for Genomic Regulation, Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain [2] Departament de Ciencies Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain [3]. ; 1] Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Yale University, Bass 432, 266 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA [2] Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, Bass 432, 266 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. ; Center for Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Functional Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA. ; Department of Statistics, University of California, Berkeley, 367 Evans Hall, Berkeley, California 94720-3860, USA. ; Department of Genome Sciences and University of Washington School of Medicine, William H. Foege Building S350D, 1705 Northeast Pacific Street, Box 355065 Seattle, Washington 98195-5065, USA. ; 1] Department of Genome Dynamics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Berkeley, 367 Evans Hall, Berkeley, California 94720-3860, USA. ; Department of Genome Dynamics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. ; 1] Department of Biology, Indiana University, 1001 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47405-7005, USA [2] Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics, Indiana University, 1001 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47405-7005, USA. ; MOE Key Lab of Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-9307, USA. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK. ; 1] Centre for Genomic Regulation, Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain [2] Departament de Ciencies Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ; 1] Center for Integrative Genomics, University of Lausanne, Genopode building, Lausanne 1015, Switzerland [2] Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Genopode building, Lausanne 1015, Switzerland. ; 1] Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK [2] Medical and Molecular Genetics, King's College London, London WC2R 2LS, UK. ; Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8005, USA. ; Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, PO Box 208103, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. ; Department of Biology, Indiana University, 1001 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47405-7005, USA. ; Sloan-Kettering Institute, 1275 York Avenue, Box 252, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; 1] Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Institute for Systems Genomics, University of Connecticut Health Center, 400 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, Connecticut 06030, USA [2] Department of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 USA. ; Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University, 465 21st Avenue South, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-8240, USA. ; 1] Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, USA [2] Center for Complex Biological Systems, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, USA. ; Section of Developmental Genomics, Laboratory of Cellular and Developmental Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Institute for Systems Genomics, University of Connecticut Health Center, 400 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, Connecticut 06030, USA. ; 1] Department of Genetics and Drosophila RNAi Screening Center, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Center for Integrative Genomics, University of Lausanne, Genopode building, Lausanne 1015, Switzerland. ; 1] Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK [2] European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, CB10 1SD, UK. ; 1] Bioinformatics and Genomics Programme, Center for Genomic Regulation, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (CRG-UPF), 08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain [2] Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, Theoretical Biochemistry Group (TBI), University of Vienna, Wahringerstrasse 17/3/303, A-1090 Vienna, Austria. ; 1] Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Institute for Systems Genomics, University of Connecticut Health Center, 400 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, Connecticut 06030, USA [2] Key Laboratory of Computational Biology, CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China. ; 1] Hong Kong Bioinformatics Centre, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong [2] 5 CUHK-BGI Innovation Institute of Trans-omics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong. ; 1] Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [3]. ; 1] Department of Genome Dynamics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2].〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25164755" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Caenorhabditis elegans/embryology/*genetics/growth & development ; Chromatin/genetics ; Cluster Analysis ; Drosophila melanogaster/*genetics/growth & development ; *Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental/genetics ; Histones/metabolism ; Humans ; Larva/genetics/growth & development ; Models, Genetic ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics ; Pupa/genetics/growth & development ; RNA, Untranslated/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, RNA ; Transcriptome/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-03-18
    Description: The centromere is a unique chromosomal locus that ensures accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell division by directing the assembly of a multiprotein complex, the kinetochore. The centromere is marked by a conserved variant of conventional histone H3 termed CenH3 or CENP-A (ref. 2). A conserved motif of CenH3, the CATD, defined by loop 1 and helix 2 of the histone fold, is necessary and sufficient for specifying centromere functions of CenH3 (refs 3, 4). The structural basis of this specification is of particular interest. Yeast Scm3 and human HJURP are conserved non-histone proteins that interact physically with the (CenH3-H4)(2) heterotetramer and are required for the deposition of CenH3 at centromeres in vivo. Here we have elucidated the structural basis for recognition of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) CenH3 (called Cse4) by Scm3. We solved the structure of the Cse4-binding domain (CBD) of Scm3 in complex with Cse4 and H4 in a single chain model. An alpha-helix and an irregular loop at the conserved amino terminus and a shorter alpha-helix at the carboxy terminus of Scm3(CBD) wraps around the Cse4-H4 dimer. Four Cse4-specific residues in the N-terminal region of helix 2 are sufficient for specific recognition by conserved and functionally important residues in the N-terminal helix of Scm3 through formation of a hydrophobic cluster. Scm3(CBD) induces major conformational changes and sterically occludes DNA-binding sites in the structure of Cse4 and H4. These findings have implications for the assembly and architecture of the centromeric nucleosome.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3077455/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3077455/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhou, Zheng -- Feng, Hanqiao -- Zhou, Bing-Rui -- Ghirlando, Rodolfo -- Hu, Kaifeng -- Zwolak, Adam -- Miller Jenkins, Lisa M -- Xiao, Hua -- Tjandra, Nico -- Wu, Carl -- Bai, Yawen -- Z01 BC010808-01/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Apr 14;472(7342):234-7. doi: 10.1038/nature09854. Epub 2011 Mar 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21412236" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Autoantigens/chemistry/metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Centromere/*chemistry/metabolism ; Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Conserved Sequence ; DNA/chemistry/metabolism ; DNA-Binding Proteins/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Histones/chemistry/metabolism ; Humans ; Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Chaperones/chemistry/metabolism ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular ; Nucleosomes/chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Protein Conformation ; *Saccharomyces cerevisiae/cytology/metabolism ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/*chemistry/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-02-03
    Description: The alternative non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) machinery facilitates several genomic rearrangements, some of which can lead to cellular transformation. This error-prone repair pathway is triggered upon telomere de-protection to promote the formation of deleterious chromosome end-to-end fusions. Using next-generation sequencing technology, here we show that repair by alternative NHEJ yields non-TTAGGG nucleotide insertions at fusion breakpoints of dysfunctional telomeres. Investigating the enzymatic activity responsible for the random insertions enabled us to identify polymerase theta (Poltheta; encoded by Polq in mice) as a crucial alternative NHEJ factor in mammalian cells. Polq inhibition suppresses alternative NHEJ at dysfunctional telomeres, and hinders chromosomal translocations at non-telomeric loci. In addition, we found that loss of Polq in mice results in increased rates of homology-directed repair, evident by recombination of dysfunctional telomeres and accumulation of RAD51 at double-stranded breaks. Lastly, we show that depletion of Poltheta has a synergistic effect on cell survival in the absence of BRCA genes, suggesting that the inhibition of this mutagenic polymerase represents a valid therapeutic avenue for tumours carrying mutations in homology-directed repair genes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4718306/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4718306/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Mateos-Gomez, Pedro A -- Gong, Fade -- Nair, Nidhi -- Miller, Kyle M -- Lazzerini-Denchi, Eros -- Sfeir, Agnel -- AG038677/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016087/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG038677/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Feb 12;518(7538):254-7. doi: 10.1038/nature14157. Epub 2015 Feb 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, Department of Cell Biology, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biosciences, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin. 2506 Speedway Stop A5000, Austin, Texas 78712, USA. ; Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25642960" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Base Sequence ; Cell Death/genetics ; Cell Line ; Chromosome Aberrations ; Chromosomes, Mammalian/genetics/*metabolism ; *DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded ; *DNA End-Joining Repair ; DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase/deficiency/*metabolism ; Genes, BRCA1 ; Genes, BRCA2 ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Mice ; Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/genetics/metabolism ; Rad51 Recombinase/metabolism ; *Recombination, Genetic/genetics ; Recombinational DNA Repair/genetics ; Telomere/*genetics/*metabolism ; Translocation, Genetic/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-03-19
    Description: Expansions of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the noncoding region of the C9orf72 gene are the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. Decreased expression of C9orf72 is seen in expansion carriers, suggesting that loss of function may play a role in disease. We found that two independent mouse lines lacking the C9orf72 ortholog (3110043O21Rik) in all tissues developed normally and aged without motor neuron disease. Instead, C9orf72 null mice developed progressive splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy with accumulation of engorged macrophage-like cells. C9orf72 expression was highest in myeloid cells, and the loss of C9orf72 led to lysosomal accumulation and altered immune responses in macrophages and microglia, with age-related neuroinflammation similar to C9orf72 ALS but not sporadic ALS human patient tissue. Thus, C9orf72 is required for the normal function of myeloid cells, and altered microglial function may contribute to neurodegeneration in C9orf72 expansion carriers.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉O'Rourke, J G -- Bogdanik, L -- Yanez, A -- Lall, D -- Wolf, A J -- Muhammad, A K M G -- Ho, R -- Carmona, S -- Vit, J P -- Zarrow, J -- Kim, K J -- Bell, S -- Harms, M B -- Miller, T M -- Dangler, C A -- Underhill, D M -- Goodridge, H S -- Lutz, C M -- Baloh, R H -- GM085796/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- NS069669/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- NS078398/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- NS087351/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- UL1TR000124/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 18;351(6279):1324-9. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf1064.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. ; The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA. ; Division of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. ; Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. Department of Neurology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26989253" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/immunology ; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/genetics/*immunology ; Animals ; Frontotemporal Dementia/genetics/*immunology ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors/genetics/*physiology ; Heterozygote ; Humans ; Lymphatic Diseases/genetics/immunology ; Macrophages/*immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; Microglia/*immunology ; Myeloid Cells/*immunology ; Proteins/genetics/*physiology ; Rats ; Splenomegaly/genetics/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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