Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • IMRT  (18)
  • ONCOLOGY  (12)
  • 1
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    Springer Verlag
    Keywords: radiation ; OPTIMIZATION ; treatment ; TECHNOLOGY ; inverse planning ; ONCOLOGY ; RADIATION ONCOLOGY
    Type of Publication: Book chapter
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: RADIATION-THERAPY ; LOCALIZATION ; DATABASE ; IMRT ; radiation ; SYSTEM ; THERAPY ; THERAPIES ; radiation therapy
    Type of Publication: Book chapter
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: OPTIMIZATION ; radiotherapy ; Germany ; THERAPY ; ALGORITHM ; ALGORITHMS ; imaging ; NUCLEAR-MEDICINE ; radiation ; SEQUENCE ; treatment ; DISTRIBUTIONS ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; DIFFERENCE ; NUMBER ; BEAM ; DELIVERY ; STRATEGIES ; INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY ; MULTILEAF COLLIMATOR ; SEGMENTS ; nuclear medicine ; IMRT ; APPROXIMATION ; MAPS ; radiology ; PROGRAM ; THERAPIES ; radiation therapy ; intensity modulated radiotherapy ; NUCLEAR ; technique ; BEAMS ; MEDICINE ; ERROR ; CONSTRAINTS
    Abstract: In inverse planning for intensity-modulated radiotherapy ( IMRT), the fluence distribution of each treatment beam is usually calculated in an optimization process. The delivery of the resulting treatment plan using multileaf collimators ( MLCs) is performed either in the step-and-shoot or sliding window technique. For step-and-shoot delivery, the arbitrary beam fluence distributions have to be transformed into an applicable sequence of subsegments. In a stratification step the complexity of the fluence maps is reduced by assigning each beamlet to discrete intensity values, followed by the sequencing step that generates the subsegments. In this work, we concentrate on the stratification for step-and-shoot delivery. Different concepts of stratification are formally introduced. In addition to already used strategies that minimize the difference between original and stratified beam intensities, we propose an original stratification principle that minimizes the error of the resulting dose distribution. It could be shown that for a comparable total number of subsegments the dose-oriented stratification results in a better approximation of the original, unsequenced plan. The presented algorithm can replace the stratification routine in existing sequencer programs and can also be applied to interpolated plans that are generated in an interactive decision making process of multicriteria inverse planning programs
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17881818
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; radiotherapy ; tumor ; carcinoma ; Germany ; THERAPY ; CT ; FOLLOW-UP ; imaging ; SURGERY ; radiation ; PATIENT ; prognosis ; CONTRAST ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; chemotherapy ; DELIVERY ; AD ; ESOPHAGUS ; RANDOMIZED-TRIAL ; IMRT ; radiology ; GUIDANCE ; THERAPIES ; LIBRARIES ; chemoradiation ; radiation therapy ; CT SCANS ; LIBRARY ; ESOPHAGEAL CANCER ; IMAGE GUIDANCE ; JUNCTION ; ATRIAL-FIBRILLATION ; outcome ; GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY ; RADIOCHEMOTHERAPY ; POSITION ; SCAN ; STRATEGY ; LIMITATIONS ; Esophageal carcinoma
    Abstract: Background: Despite maximum therapy the prognosis of esophageal carcinoma still remains extremely poor. New treatment strategies including improved radiation therapy techniques promise better outcome by improving local control through precise dose delivery due to higher conformality. Case Report: A 62-year-old patient with locally advanced carcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction underwent definitive radiochemotherapy with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). On positioning control with the in-room CT, the distal. esophagus, and hence the tumor, was found to be highly mobile exhibiting changes in position of up to 4 cm from fraction to fraction. Result: IMRT plans were created for various positions establishing a plan library to choose from as appropriate. CT scans were performed prior to each treatment fraction to clarify esophagus position in order to choose the adequate treatment plan. Conclusion. Image guidance was crucial in this unusual case of esophageal carcinoma. Without the information from position control CTs, the tumor would have received only about half the prescribed dose due to variations in position. For this specific case, in-room CT scans are probably superior to kilo- or megavoltage CTs due to the higher soft-tissue contrast enabling detection of positioning variation of the organ and offering the possibility to use the CT for treatment planning
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19714309
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Keywords: radiotherapy ; TUMORS ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; chemotherapy ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY ; CISPLATIN ; IMRT ; reirradiation ; NASOPHARYNGEAL CARCINOMA ; ONCOLOGY-GROUP ; head and neck cancer ; XEROSTOMIA ; Recurrent head and neck cancer ; late toxicity ; UNRESECTABLE HEAD
    Abstract: Background In this retrospective investigation we analyzed outcome and toxicity after intensity-modulated reirradiation of recurrent head and neck cancer. Results Median overall survival was 17 months, and the 1- and 2-year overall survival rates were 63% and 34%. The 1- and 2-year local control rates were 57% and 53%. Distant spread occurred in 34%, and reirradiation induced considerable late toxicity in 21% of the patients. Thirty-two percent showed increased xerostomia after reirradiation. The risk for xerostomia was significantly higher for cumulative mean doses of greater-than-or-equal 45 Gy to parotid glands. Considering median cumulative maximum doses of 53 Gy to the spinal cord and 63 Gy to the brainstem, no late toxicities were observed. Conclusions Reirradiation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy in recurrent head and neck cancer is feasible with acceptable toxicity and yields encouraging rates of local control and overall survival.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Keywords: radiotherapy ; Germany ; EXPERIENCE ; mesothelioma ; IMRT ; pleura ; intensity
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; radiotherapy ; tumor ; COMBINATION ; Germany ; LUNG ; PROSTATE ; ALGORITHM ; CT ; imaging ; INFORMATION ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; MASK ; TISSUE ; TIME ; PATIENT ; COMPLEX ; COMPLEXES ; CONTRAST ; treatment ; TARGET ; ACQUISITION ; EXPERIENCE ; VECTOR ; NUMBER ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; REGISTRATION ; BEAM ; DELIVERY ; HEAD ; CANCER-PATIENTS ; MULTILEAF COLLIMATOR ; treatment planning ; BODY ; CANCER PATIENTS ; LINEAR-ACCELERATOR ; RECONSTRUCTION ; IMRT ; PATIENT FIXATION ; IMPLEMENTATION ; INCREASE ; chordoma ; LEVEL ; methods ; fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy ; technique ; MUTUAL INFORMATION ; cancer research ; cone beam CT ; LANDMARK ; INCREASES ; CLINICAL IMPLEMENTATION ; ACCELERATOR ; WORKLOAD
    Abstract: ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was the clinical implementation of a kV cone beam CT (CBCT) for setup correction in radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: For evaluation of the setup correction workflow, six tumor patients (lung cancer, sacral chordoma, head-and-neck and paraspinal tumor, and two prostate cancer patients) were selected. All patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, five of them with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For patient fixation, a scotch cast body frame or a vacuum pillow, each in combination with a scotch cast head mask, were used. The imaging equipment, consisting of an x-ray tube and a flat panel imager (FPI), was attached to a Siemens linear accelerator according to the in-line approach, i.e. with the imaging beam mounted opposite to the treatment beam sharing the same isocenter. For dose delivery, the treatment beam has to traverse the FPI which is mounted in the accessory tray below the multi-leaf collimator. For each patient, a predefined number of imaging projections over a range of at least 200 degrees were acquired. The fast reconstruction of the 3D-CBCT dataset was done with an implementation of the Feldkamp-David-Kress (FDK) algorithm. For the registration of the treatment planning CT with the acquired CBCT, an automatic mutual information matcher and manual matching was used. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Bony landmarks were easily detected and the table shifts for correction of setup deviations could be automatically calculated in all cases. The image quality was sufficient for a visual comparison of the desired target point with the isocenter visible on the CBCT. Soft tissue contrast was problematic for the prostate of an obese patient, but good in the lung tumor case. The detected maximum setup deviation was 3 mm for patients fixated with the body frame, and 6 mm for patients positioned in the vacuum pillow. Using an action level of 2 mm translational error, a target point correction was carried out in 4 cases. The additional workload of the described workflow compared to a normal treatment fraction led to an extra time of about 10-12 minutes, which can be further reduced by streamlining the different steps. CONCLUSION: The cone beam CT attached to a LINAC allows the acquisition of a CT scan of the patient in treatment position directly before treatment. Its image quality is sufficient for determining target point correction vectors. With the presented workflow, a target point correction within a clinically reasonable time frame is possible. This increases the treatment precision, and potentially the complex patient fixation techniques will become dispensable
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16723023
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Keywords: IRRADIATION ; radiotherapy ; Germany ; VOLUME ; CYCLE ; treatment ; BREAST ; IONIZATION ; DELIVERY ; MOTION ; IMRT ; ORGAN MOTION
    Abstract: For intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of deep-seated tumours, dosimetric variations of the original static dose profiles due to breathing motion can be primarily considered as blurring effects known from conventional radiotherapy. The purpose of this dosimetric study was to clarify whether these results are transferable to superficial targets and to quantify the additional effect of fractionation. A solid polystyrene phantom and an anthropomorphic phantom were used for film and ion chamber dose measurements. The phantoms were installed on an electric driven device and moved with a frequency of 6 or 12 cycles per minute and an amplitude of 4 mm or 10 mm. A split beam geometry of two adjacent asymmetric fields and an IMRT treatment plan with 12 fields for irradiation of the breast were investigated. For the split beam geometry the dose modifications due to unintended superposition of partial fields were reduced by fractionation and completely smoothed out after 20 fractions. IMRT applied to the moving phantom led to a more homogeneous dose distribution compared to the static phantom. The standard deviation of the target dose which is a measure of the dose homogeneity was 10.3 cGy for the static phantom and 7.7 cGy for a 10 mm amplitude. The absolute dose values, measured with ionization chambers, remained unaffected. Irradiation of superficial targets by IMRT in the step-and-shoot technique did not result in unexpected dose perturbations due to breathing motion. We conclude that regular breathing motion does not jeopardize IMRT of superficial target volumes
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16510947
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Keywords: CELLS ; radiotherapy ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; CELL ; Germany ; neoplasms ; THERAPY ; TOXICITY ; FOLLOW-UP ; DISEASE ; TUMORS ; SURGERY ; radiation ; MRI ; PROGRESSION ; CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY ; EXPERIENCE ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; AGE ; EFFICACY ; REGION ; HEAD ; NECK ; local control ; ONCOLOGY ; overall survival ; radiation therapy ; MENINGIOMAS ; BONE ; SCAN ; INSTITUTION ; CASE SERIES
    Abstract: Background: Giant cell tumors are rare neoplasms, representing less than 5% of all bone tumors. The vast majority of giant cell tumors occurs in extremity sites and is treated by surgery alone. However, a small percentage occurs in pelvis, spine or skull bones, where complete resection is challenging. Radiation therapy seems to be an option in these patients, despite the lack of a generally accepted dose or fractionation concept. Here we present a series of five cases treated with high dose IMRT. Patients and Methods: From 2000 and 2006 a total of five patients with histologically proven benign giant cell tumors have been treated with IMRT in our institution. Two patients were male, three female, and median age was 30 years (range 20 - 60). The tumor was located in the sacral region in four and in the sphenoid sinus in one patient. All patients had measurable gross disease prior to radiotherapy with a median size of 9 cm. All patients were treated with IMRT to a median total dose of 64 Gy (range 57.6 Gy to 66 Gy) in conventional fractionation. Results: Median follow up was 46 months ranging from 30 to 107 months. Overall survival was 100%. One patient developed local disease progression three months after radiotherapy and needed extensive surgical salvage. The remaining four patients have been locally controlled, resulting in a local control rate of 80%. We found no substantial tumor shrinkage after radiotherapy but in two patients morphological signs of extensive tumor necrosis were present on MRI scans. Decline of pain and/or neurological symptoms were seen in all four locally controlled patients. The patient who needed surgical salvage showed markedly reduced pain but developed functional deficits of bladder, rectum and lower extremity due to surgery. No severe acute or late toxicities attributable to radiation therapy were observed so far. Conclusion: IMRT is a feasible option in giant cells tumors not amendable to complete surgical removal. In our case series local control was achieved in four out of five patients with marked symptom relief in the majority of cases. No severe toxicity was observed
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20187955
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Keywords: IRRADIATION ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; SYSTEM ; RESOLUTION ; radiation ; PATIENT ; treatment ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; ENERGY ; LINE ; IONIZATION ; INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY ; LINEAR-ACCELERATOR ; IMRT ; in vivo ; TRANSMISSION ; CLINICAL IMPLEMENTATION ; DIODE DOSIMETRY ; ROUTINE QUALITY-ASSURANCE
    Abstract: Permanent in vivo verification of IMRT photon beam profiles by a radiation detector with spatial resolution, positioned on the radiation entrance side of the patient, has not been clinically available so far. In this work we present the DAVID system, which is able to perform this quality assurance measurement while the patient is treated. The DAVID system is a flat, multi-wire transmission-type ionization chamber, placed in the accessory holder of the linear accelerator and constructed from translucent materials in order not to interfere with the light field. Each detection wire of the chamber is positioned exactly in the projection line of a MLC leaf pair, and the signal of each wire is proportional to the line integral of the ionization density along this wire. Thereby, each measurement channel essentially presents the line integral of the ionization density over the opening width of the associated leaf pair. The sum of all wire signals is a measure of the dose-area product of the transmitted photon beam and of the total radiant energy administered to the patient. After the dosimetric verification of an IMRT plan, the values measured by the DAVID system are stored as reference values. During daily treatment the signals are re-measured and compared to the reference values. A warning is output if there is a deviation beyond a threshold. The error detection capability is a leaf position error of less than I mm for an isocentric I cm x I cm field, and of I mm for an isocentric 20 cm x 20 cm field
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16481690
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...