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  • IN-VITRO  (11)
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  • 1
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; IN-VITRO ; carcinoma ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; INHIBITION ; THERAPY ; VITRO ; GENE ; GENES ; LINES ; MICE ; PATIENT ; IMPACT ; INDUCTION ; treatment ; 5-FLUOROURACIL ; prevention ; resistance ; AGE ; NUDE-MICE ; CELL-LINE ; chemotherapy ; LINE ; CARCINOMAS ; specificity ; CISPLATIN ; pancreatic cancer ; CANCER-THERAPY ; CYTOTOXICITY ; signaling ; GEMCITABINE ; RE ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; cancer therapy ; pancreatic ; GENDER ; dexamethasone ; GLUCOCORTICOID-INDUCED APOPTOSIS ; NAUSEA ; HISTOLOGY ; in vivo ; surgical resection
    Abstract: Background: Chemotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma often has severe side effects that limit its efficacy. The glucocorticoid (GC) dexamethasone (DEX) is frequently used as co-treatment to prevent side effects of chemotherapy such as nausea, for palliative purposes and to treat allergic reactions. While the potent pro-apoptotic properties and the supportive effects of GCs to tumour therapy in lymphoid cells are well studied, the impact of GCs to cytotoxic treatment of pancreatic carcinoma is unknown. Methods: A prospective study of DEX-mediated resistance was performed using a pancreatic carcinoma xenografted to nude mice, 20 surgical resections and 10 established pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Antiapoptotic signaling in response to DEX was examined by Western blot analysis. Results: In vitro, DEX inhibited drug-induced apoptosis and promoted the growth in all of 10 examined malignant cells. Ex vivo, DEX used in physiological concentrations significantly prevented the cytotoxic effect of gemcitabine and cisplatin in 18 of 20 freshly isolated cell lines from resected pancreatic tumours. No correlation with age, gender, histology, TNM and induction of therapy resistance by DEX co-treatment could be detected. In vivo, DEX totally prevented cytotoxicity of chemotherapy to pancreatic carcinoma cells xenografted to nude mice. Mechanistically, DEX upregulated pro-survival factors and anti-apoptotic genes in established pancreatic carcinoma cells. Conclusion: These data show that DEX induces therapy resistance in pancreatic carcinoma cells and raise the question whether GC-mediated protection of tumour cells from cancer therapy may be dangerous for patients
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16539710
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  • 2
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; CELLS ; IN-VITRO ; tumor ; AGENTS ; carcinoma ; CELL ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; INHIBITION ; THERAPY ; VITRO ; VIVO ; SAMPLES ; TUMORS ; TIME ; PATIENT ; INDUCTION ; cell cycle ; CELL-CYCLE ; CYCLE ; treatment ; PROGRESSION ; resistance ; INDUCED APOPTOSIS ; PLASMA ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; chemotherapy ; ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC-LEUKEMIA ; DERIVATIVES ; HEPATOMA-CELLS ; EPITHELIAL-CELLS ; CARCINOMAS ; PHARMACOKINETICS ; AGENT ; SINGLE ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; EX-VIVO ; SOLID TUMORS ; MEDIATED APOPTOSIS ; MOLECULAR-MECHANISMS ; LEVEL ; analysis ; methods ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; dexamethasone ; PROMOTION ; USA ; GLUCOCORTICOIDS ; prospective ; in vivo ; clinical study
    Abstract: Background: Glucocorticoids have been used widely in conjunction with cancer therapy due to their ability to induce apoptosis in hematological cells and to prevent nausea and emesis. However, recent data including ours, suggest induction of therapy resistance by glucocorticoids in solid tumors, although it is unclear whether this happens only in few carcinomas or is a more common cell type specific phenomenon. Material and Methods: We performed an overall statistical analysis of our new and recent data obtained with 157 tumor probes evaluated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. The effect of glucocorticoids on apoptosis, viability and cell cycle progression under diverse clinically important questions was examined. Results: New in vivo results demonstrate glucocorticoid - induced chemotherapy resistance in xenografted prostate cancer. In an overall statistical analysis we found glucocorticoid - induced resistance in 89% of 157 analysed tumor samples. Resistance is common for several cytotoxic treatments and for several glucocorticoid - derivatives and due to an inhibition of apoptosis, promotion of viability and cell cycle progression. Resistance occurred at clinically achievable peak plasma levels of patients under anti - emetic glucocorticoid therapy and below, lasted for a long time, after one single dose, but was reversible upon removal of glucocorticoids. Two nonsteroidal alternative anti - emetic agents did not counteract anticancer treatment and may be sufficient to replace gluco corticoids in cotreatment of carcinoma patients. Conclusion: These data demonstrate the need for prospective clinical studies as well as for detailed mechanistic studies of GC - induced cell - type specific pro - and anti - apoptotic signalling
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17224649
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  • 3
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; IN-VITRO ; tumor ; TUMOR-CELLS ; carcinoma ; IN-VIVO ; THERAPY ; GENE ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; HYBRIDIZATION ; TUMORS ; radiation ; PATIENT ; NF-KAPPA-B ; FAMILY ; MEMBER ; NUCLEAR-FACTOR ; NORMAL TISSUE ; CISPLATIN ; PROGRAMMED CELL-DEATH ; ALPHA-INDUCED APOPTOSIS ; DNA-DAMAGING AGENTS ; GLOMERULAR ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS ; GRANULOSA-CELLS ; LEUKEMIA- CELLS ; LUNG-CARCINOMA ; T- LYMPHOCYTES
    Abstract: Chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer often have severe side effects that limit their efficacy. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used as cotreatment because they may have potent proapoptotic properties and reduce nausea, hyperemesis, and acute toxicity on normal tissue. In contrast to the proapoptotic effect of GCs in lymphoid cells, resistance toward cancer therapy-mediated apoptosis was induced in solid tumors of human cervix and lung carcinomas. Filter hybridization, expression data, as well as functional assays identified multiple core apoptosis molecules, which are regulated by GCs in a pro- or antiapoptotic manner. Both antiapoptotic genes such as FLIP and members of the Bcl-2 and IAP family as well as proapoptotic elements of the death receptor and mitochondrial apoptosis pathways were down-regulated in carcinomas resulting in a decreased activity of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3. In contrast, death receptor and mitochondrial apoptosis signaling as well as caspase activity was enhanced by dexamethasone in lymphoid cells. To restore apoptosis sensitivity in dexamethasone-treated carcinomas, caspase-8 and caspase-9 were transfected. This resensitized tumor cells in vitro and xenografts in vivo to cisplatin induced cell death. These data therefore raise concern about the widespread combined use of GCs with antineoplastic drugs or agents in the clinical management of cancer patients
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12810637
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  • 4
    Keywords: brain ; APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; CELLS ; IN-VITRO ; SURVIVAL ; AGENTS ; CELL ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; VITRO ; DEATH ; DRUG ; SURGERY ; LINES ; TIME ; PATIENT ; LIGAND ; primary ; INDUCTION ; tumour ; treatment ; culture ; ACID ; CELL-DEATH ; PLASMA ; RATES ; RESECTION ; PHARMACOKINETICS ; CISPLATIN ; FUTURE ; TRAIL ; AGENT ; POTENT ; REGRESSION ; IV ; GRADE ; brain tumour ; betulinic acid ; CERAMIDE ; glioblastoma multiforme WHOIV
    Abstract: Background. Glioblastoma multiforme (WHO Grade IV, GBM) is the most malignant brain tumour with a mean survival time of less than one year. Betulinic acid, ceramide and TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand) represent novel therapeutic agents for potential use in GBM. Method. Primary GBM cells of 21 patients with macroscopically complete tumour resection were tested in vitro for cell death induction by betulinic acid, ceramide, TRAIL and established therapeutics (BCNU, cisplatin, doxorubicin, vincristin and gamma-irradiation). Findings. At peak plasma concentrations (PPC), Betulinic acid, ceramide and TRAIL induced cell death in primary GBM cells at higher rates than established cytotoxic drugs. Specific cell death greater than or equal to75% was observed in 43% (9/21), 38% (8/21), and 19% (4/21) for betulinic acid, ceramide, and TRAIL respectively, while this was only found in 5% (1/21) of gamma-irradiated and cisplatin-treated cells, and in none of the GBM cultures, where BCNU or vincristin were applied in PPC. Conclusion. Due to a markedly improved cell death of GBM cells as compared with established therapeutics, Betulinic acid, ceramide and TRAIL might represent potent substances for future treatment of GBM
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15197616
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  • 5
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; APOPTOSIS ; EXPRESSION ; IN-VITRO ; tumor ; carcinoma ; CELL ; CELL LUNG-CANCER ; Germany ; human ; IN-VIVO ; LUNG ; MODEL ; MODELS ; VITRO ; VIVO ; DEATH ; NEW-YORK ; GENE ; TUMORS ; LINES ; MICE ; FAMILY ; MEMBER ; MEMBERS ; treatment ; immunohistochemistry ; MALIGNANCIES ; ASSAY ; resistance ; CELL-DEATH ; INDUCED APOPTOSIS ; Western-blot ; NUDE-MICE ; chemotherapy ; CARCINOMAS ; STRATEGIES ; western blot ; FAILURE ; LUNG-CARCINOMA ; CASPASE 8 ; nude mice ; Bcl-2 ; CD95 ; DRUG-INDUCED APOPTOSIS ; XENOGRAFTS ; CD95/Fas/APO-1,TRAIL,gene therapy,drug reststance,cancer therapy ; IMMUNE-SYSTEM
    Abstract: Non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a highly lethal malignancy that often becomes resistant to chemotherapy. To determine whether alterations in apoptotic signaling might contribute to such resistance, we established in vitro and in vivo models for sensitive and resistant human NSCLC. We found that resistance is due to multiple defects found in expression of CD95-L, CD95 and members of the Bcl-2 and IAP family, as well as caspase-8, -9 and -3 as examined by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, gene array analysis and functional assays. Failure to activate death receptor, as well as mitochondrial apoptosis signaling, points to a central role of caspases. To restore apoptosis signaling we transfected NSCLC xenografts on nude mice with caspase-8 and -9. This treatment strongly induced apoptosis per se and sensitized the tumors to cisplatin-induced cell death. Thus, these findings indicate that re-expression of caspases might be an effective strategy to restore sensitivity for chemotherapy in NSCLC in vivo. (C) 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 6
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; IN-VITRO ; INHIBITOR ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; carcinoma ; CELL ; COMBINATION ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; MODEL ; MODELS ; THERAPY ; VITRO ; VIVO ; PROTEINS ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; TIME ; NF-KAPPA-B ; ACTIVATION ; LIGAND ; INDEX ; TISSUES ; CONTRAST ; ANTITUMOR-ACTIVITY ; TARGET ; MOUSE ; resistance ; CARCINOMA CELLS ; CELL-DEATH ; MEMBRANE ; CARCINOMA-CELLS ; adenocarcinoma ; NORMAL TISSUE ; REVEALS ; CHILDREN ; pancreatic cancer ; pancreatic carcinoma ; TRAIL ; HUMAN PROSTATE-CANCER ; TRAIL-INDUCED APOPTOSIS ; APOPTOSIS-INDUCING LIGAND ; DRUG-INDUCED APOPTOSIS ; INHIBITORS ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; THERAPIES ; DECOY RECEPTORS ; development ; X-LINKED INHIBITOR ; pancreatic adenocarcinoma ; USA ; ANTAGONISTS ; pancreatic tumor ; IRRADIATION-INDUCED APOPTOSIS ; XIAP ; therapeutic ; ALPHA-DEPENDENT APOPTOSIS
    Abstract: Evasion of apoptosis is a characteristic feature of pancreatic cancer, a prototypic cancer that is refractory to current treatment approaches. Hence, there is an urgent need to design rational strategies that counter apoptosis resistance. To explore X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) as a therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer, we analyzed the expression of XIAP in pancreatic tumor samples and evaluated the effect of small molecule XIAP inhibitors alone and in combination with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) against pancreatic carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report that XIAP is highly expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma samples compared with normal pancreatic ducts. Small molecule XIAP inhibitors synergize with TRAIL to induce apoptosis and to inhibit long-term clonogenic survival of pancreatic carcinoma cells. In contrast, they do not reverse the lack of toxicity of TRAIL on nonmalignant cells in vitro or normal tissues in vivo, pointing to a therapeutic index. Most importantly, XIAP inhibitors cooperate with TRAIL to trigger apoptosis and suppress pancreatic carcinoma growth in vivo in two preclinical models, i.e., the chorioallantoic membrane model and a mouse xenograft model. Parallel immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue under therapy reveals that the XIAP inhibitor acts in concert with TRAIL to cause caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In conclusion, our findings provide, for the first time, evidence in vivo that XIAP inhibitors prime pancreatic carcinoma cells for TRAM-induced apoptosis and potentiate the antitumor activity of TRAIL against established pancreatic carcinoma. These findings build the rationale for further (pre)clinical development of XIAP inhibitors and TRAIL against pancreatic cancer. [Cancer Res 2009;69(6):2425-34]
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19258513
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  • 7
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; IN-VITRO ; CELL ; Germany ; human ; IN-VIVO ; THERAPY ; VITRO ; VIVO ; SYSTEM ; DEATH ; GENE ; PROTEIN ; DRUG ; LINES ; MICE ; gene transfer ; GENE-TRANSFER ; LIGAND ; INDUCTION ; tumour ; T cell ; T cells ; T-CELL ; T-CELLS ; ANTITUMOR-ACTIVITY ; TARGET ; LYMPHOMA ; resistance ; CELL-DEATH ; chemotherapy ; LINE ; CANCER-CELLS ; PRODUCT ; SURFACE ; sensitization ; SELECTION ; CELL-SURFACE ; TRAIL ; HUMAN HEPATOCYTES ; APOPTOSIS-INDUCING LIGAND ; DRINKING ; DRUG-INDUCED APOPTOSIS ; INDUCE APOPTOSIS ; TRAIL,gene therapy,Tet system,apoptosis,B cell lymphoma
    Abstract: In the present study, we demonstrate the utility of a non-tumour-forming T-cell line for the inducible gene transfer of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (Apo2L/TRAIL), which has been shown to selectively induce apoptosis in malignant but not in normal cells. To generate T cells inducible for TRAIL expression, we stably transfected Jurkat cells with TRAIL in the context of the Tet-On system. The switched on cells strongly expressed TRAIL mRNA, whose protein product was expressed on the cell surface. Paracrine induction of apoptosis in human target tumour cells was solely found for membrane-bound TRAIL. The Jurkat-TRAIL cells itself survived due to clonal selection of TRAIL-resistant cells. Jurkat-TRAIL cells had an additive effect with cytotoxic drugs in vitro, since cell death was enhanced. To elucidate the antitumoral activity of these Jurkat-TRAIL cells in vivo, we injected them intratumorally in xenografts of human Burkitt lymphomas. Switching on expression of TRAIL by adding tetracycline to the drinking water of the mice strongly reduced tumour growth by apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner. Thus, non-tumour-forming T-cell lines offer a novel method for gene transfer and inducible expression of TRAIL in tumour therapy
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14647152
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  • 8
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; CANCER CELLS ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; IN-VITRO ; SURVIVAL ; carcinoma ; CELL ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; INHIBITION ; THERAPY ; VITRO ; VIVO ; DENSITY ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; TISSUE ; LINES ; MICE ; PATIENT ; IMPACT ; INDUCTION ; CELL-LINES ; treatment ; BREAST-CANCER ; prevention ; resistance ; PLASMA ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; NUDE-MICE ; CELL-LINE ; chemotherapy ; LINE ; CANCER-CELLS ; CANCER-PATIENTS ; CARCINOMAS ; ovarian carcinoma ; CANCER PATIENTS ; cell lines ; CANCER-THERAPY ; protein expression ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; TUMOR-GROWTH ; cancer therapy ; EX-VIVO ; LEVEL ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; dexamethasone ; NAUSEA ; OVARIAN CARCINOMAS ; corticosteroids ; GLUCOCORTICOIDS ; in vivo ; OVARIAN ; viability ; xenograft
    Abstract: The glucocorticoid dexamethasone is frequently used as a co-treatment in cytotoxic cancer therapy, e.g. to prevent nausea, to protect normal tissue or for other reasons. While the potent pro-apoptotic properties and supportive effects of glucocorticoids to tumour therapy in lymphoid cells are well studied, the impact on the cytotoxic treatment of ovarian carcinoma is unknown. We tested apoptosis-induction, viability, tumour growth and protein expression using established cell lines, primary cell lines freshly isolated from patient material and a xenograft on nude mice. We found a general induction of resistance toward cytotoxic therapy by DEX-co-treatment in most of the examined ovarian cancer cells treated in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo. Resistance occured independently of cell density and was found at peak plasma levels of dexamethasone and below. Mechanistically, the dexamethasone-induced expression of survival genes may be involved in the resistance. These data show that glucocorticoid-induced resistance is common in ovarian carcinomas implicating that the use of glucocorticoids may be harmful for cancer patients
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16391812
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  • 9
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; CANCER CELLS ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; IN-VITRO ; tumor ; TUMOR-CELLS ; CELL ; Germany ; human ; IN-VIVO ; LUNG ; VITRO ; VIVO ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; DEATH ; PROTEIN ; EFFICIENCY ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; MICE ; TRANSDUCTION ; ACTIVATION ; LIGAND ; INDUCTION ; T-CELLS ; SUPPRESSION ; PARTICLES ; virus ; VECTOR ; CELL-DEATH ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; NUDE-MICE ; EFFICIENT ; CANCER-CELLS ; NORMAL TISSUE ; RETROVIRAL VECTORS ; CONSTRUCTION ; VIRAL VECTORS ; TUMOR CELLS ; TRAIL ; TRANSDUCTION EFFICIENCY ; APOPTOSIS-INDUCING LIGAND ; INTEGRATION ; RECOMBINANT ; RE ; TUMOR-GROWTH ; EX-VIVO ; LENTIVIRAL VECTOR ; analysis ; TUMOR-CELL ; TRANSFORMED-CELLS ; EVALUATE ; in vivo ; EXTENT ; NECROSIS ; APO2L/TRAIL ; anticancer agent ; translational research ; CANCER GENE-THERAPY ; gene therapy for solid tumors
    Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising anticancer agent, which selectively induces apoptosis in many transformed cells without apparent toxic side effects in normal tissue. We recently described the construction and characterization of a lentiviral vector for expression of TRAIL. In this report, we evaluate its suitability for therapeutic application. In vitro, we observed specific induction of apoptosis upon transduction in human lung cancer cells. Cell death was partially dependent on successful integration and TRAIL expression by the vectors, but was to some extent mediated by protein carryover, as we found TRAIL protein associated with virus particles. Transduction of subcutaneously growing lung tumors on nude mice with lentiviral TRAIL mediated a transient suppression of tumor growth. Analysis of tumor sections revealed that transduction efficiency of lentiviral control vector but not of lentiviral TRAIL vector was high. This was because of the direct cytotoxic activity of recombinant TRAIL present in viral particles, which prevented efficient tumor transduction. These data therefore suggest that enveloped viral vectors constitutively expressing TRAIL are well suited for ex vivo applications, such as the transduction of tumor-homing cells, but may have a lower effect when used directly for the transduction of tumor cells in vivo
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17186015
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  • 10
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; CANCER CELLS ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; IN-VITRO ; INHIBITOR ; tumor ; CELL ; Germany ; human ; IN-VIVO ; THERAPY ; VITRO ; VIVO ; DEATH ; GENE ; PROTEIN ; cell line ; TUMORS ; gene therapy ; LINES ; MICE ; RELEASE ; TRANSDUCTION ; ACTIVATION ; LIGAND ; RESPONSES ; MECHANISM ; INDUCTION ; CELL-LINES ; ANTITUMOR-ACTIVITY ; IMMUNE-RESPONSES ; virus ; VECTORS ; CELL-DEATH ; CELL-LINE ; LINE ; CANCER-CELLS ; DELIVERY ; SUPERFAMILY ; immune response ; IMMUNE-RESPONSE ; GENE-THERAPY ; RECOMBINANT ADENOASSOCIATED VIRUS ; adeno-associated virus ; ADENOASSOCIATED VIRUS ; AAV ; DEATH RECEPTORS ; GENE DELIVERY ; HUMAN HEPATOCYTES ; APOPTOSIS-INDUCING LIGAND ; AAV,TRAIL,colon cancer,apoptosis
    Abstract: Gene transfer vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) are used for various experimental and clinical therapeutic approaches. In the present study, we demonstrate the utility of rAAV as a tumoricidal agent in human colorectal cancer. We constructed an rAAV vector that expresses tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/Apo2L) and used it to transduce human colorectal cancer cells. TRAIL belongs to the TNF superfamily of cytokines that are involved in various immune responses and apoptotic processes. It has been shown to induce cell death specifically in cancer cells. Transduction with AAV. TRAIL gave rise to rapid expression of TRAIL, followed by induction of apoptosis, which could be inhibited by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD. fmk, in several human colon cancer cell lines. The apoptotic mechanism included activation of caspase-3, as well as cytochrome c release from mitochondria. The outgrowth of human colorectal tumors grown in mice was completely blocked by transduction with AAV. TRAIL in vitro, while in vivo transduction significantly inhibited the growth of established tumors. AAV vectors could provide a safe method of gene delivery and offer a novel method of using TRAIL as a therapeutic protein
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14999225
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